Main definitions of jib in English

: jib1jib2

jib1

noun

  • 1Sailing
    A triangular staysail set forward of the forwardmost mast.

    • ‘Though there were as many misses as hits, the main sail, jib, and one other were burning.’
    • ‘The rig is fractional and most boats were sold with a mainsail and 120% jib as standard equipment.’
    • ‘With smooth proficiency, the trimmers backed the jib, and the mainsail was eased, swinging the bow around.’
    • ‘They were long open boats with a large spritsail and jib.’
    • ‘I have seen others opt for a cutter-type arrangement leaving the small jib and adding a genoa.’
  • 2The projecting arm of a crane.

    • ‘As I mentioned before, I could not get the model to turn in a reasonable circle with the canard jibs alone, either in a glide or under electric power.’
    • ‘In yesterday's windy conditions, the front jib of the crane dangled at the former gasometer site, the damaged part swaying towards buildings.’
    • ‘The jib or projecting arm of a crane probably derives from gibbet, and gibe and gybe are often written jibe.’
    • ‘In its ordinary sense it conveys to us an item of plant with a projecting boom or jib over which are braced lifting wires and pulleys.’
    • ‘The crane jib came to rest on the pontoon narrowly missing a civilian shipwright working beside Young Endeavour.’
    • ‘Finally, after setting down a bundle of rebar, the crane operator did not raise the jib line all the way back to the top.’
    • ‘In that post I said that I managed to delete the photo of the JCB with the jib extended.’
    • ‘They nested at the jib's end last spring, and have come back again.’
    • ‘Either can be equipped with hydraulic jibs; this gives the operator extended horizontal and vertical reach on both of the cranes.’
    • ‘Over the hangar mouth the jib of the winch can be spotted.’
    • ‘A few seagulls circled, squawked at Joe, and two pigeons on the crane's jib watched him intently.’
    • ‘It involves the employment of a second lift cylinder on the jib or secondary boom.’
    • ‘At least we know the roller-furled jib works, though overall it isn't exactly a great advert for Sunfast (the makers of the yacht).’
    • ‘The immediate area around the crane is still cordoned off for safety reasons, due to the risk of parts of the broken jib falling.’
    • ‘With three telescopic boom sections and an articulating jib, sections of pump hose are added as needed to accommodate the distance to placement.’
    • ‘The driver, who left the scene after the accident, jumped from the cab just seconds before the jib of the crane plunged down onto the seashore.’
    • ‘The 20-foot placing jib both rotates and articulates, allowing access to the pump discharge around corners and through windows.’
    • ‘‘I first saw the jib and then it just crashed into the premises,’ he said.’
    • ‘The wreck lay intact on its port side, its masts and crane jibs spreading themselves across the sand and gravel seabed.’
    • ‘Overhead power cables broke the fall of the crane as the jib of the machine tore a gaping hole in the roof of the single storey premises.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

jib

/jib/

Main definitions of jib in English

: jib1jib2

jib2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (of an animal, especially a horse) stop and refuse to go on.

    ‘he jibbed at the final fence’
    • ‘The horses slithered down the shallow bank and onto the glassy surface at a rapid trot, but the black was mistrustful of the insecure footing and jibbed skittishly.’
    stop at, stop short at, baulk at, shy at, retreat from
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a person) be unwilling to do or accept something.
      ‘he jibs at paying large bills’
      • ‘One may jib, like George Orwell, at Greene's belief that a brutally stupid gangster is capable of intellectual subtlety.’
      • ‘So he would just throw himself into his collar and it would never occur to him to jib or give up.’
      • ‘Dealing with declaration one, I understood that you were jibbing at the word ‘unlawfully’ in Mr Clayton's draft.’
      • ‘Others have jibbed at this categorisation, but I remain of the opinion that this would be the effect in legal terms of the view that no further resolution is required.’
      • ‘American scholars have jibbed at adopting this usage, and many prefer terms without the denotative baggage of caste, such as ‘status groups.’’
      • ‘That is why we jib slightly the description of this case as a negligent misstatement case.’
      • ‘Mr. Gilmartin jibbed and commented that the demand made the Mafia look like monks.’
      • ‘The amount cab owners pay for their licence could include a free access card, although few would jib at the £7 annual fee required to become a ‘gate’ user.’
      • ‘But, although I jib slightly at the supernatural Skellig's curative powers and the sentimental conclusion, the story has legs as well as wings.’
      • ‘Perhaps if the heroic hymnic patriotism had been proposed, the sarcastic young firebrand of the piano concerto (etc.) would have jibbed.’
      • ‘No doubt, some purists will still jib at this usage.’
      • ‘It jibbed at invading England in 1940, though it did undertake a number of amphibious operations in the Baltic Sea in June 1941, and later in the Black Sea.’

Origin

Early 19th century: perhaps related to French regimber (earlier regiber) to buck, rear; compare with jibe.

Pronunciation:

jib

/jib/