Main definitions of Jacobite in US English:

: Jacobite1Jacobite2

Jacobite1

noun

  • A supporter of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne after the Revolution of 1688. Drawing most of their support from Catholic clans of the Scottish Highlands, Jacobites made attempts to regain the throne in 1689–90, 1715, 1719, and 1745–6, finally being defeated at the Battle of Culloden.

    • ‘Peter Watkins' Culloden was a powerful recreation of the massacre of the Jacobites at the hands of the English in 1746, and the subsequent ransacking of the Highlands.’
    • ‘The court party retorted that the country party members were either secret Jacobites or self-seeking careerists, making trouble for their own ends.’
    • ‘Beatrix and her brother Frank, now the fifth viscount, are ardent Jacobites, and Esmond becomes involved with them in a plot to restore James Edward Stuart, the old pretender, to the throne on the death of Queen Anne.’
    • ‘She was named after Prince Charlie and was a great Jacobite, of which I'm very proud.’
    • ‘The Settler was an unreconstructed Jacobite who fled to Maryland in the dark days following the Glorious Revolution.’

adjective

  • Relating to or denoting supporters of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne after the Revolution of 1688.

    ‘the Jacobite rebellion’

Origin

From Latin Jacobus ‘James’ (see Jacobean) + -ite.

Pronunciation

Jacobite

/ˈdʒækəˌbaɪt//ˈjakəˌbīt/

Main definitions of Jacobite in US English:

: Jacobite1Jacobite2

Jacobite2

noun

  • A member of the Syrian Orthodox Church (Monophysite).

    • ‘Back in Jerusalem, the Orthodox and Jacobite Christians were allowed to stay, having only to pay the special tax imposed by Islam.’
    • ‘The Coptic church was a sister-church of the Jacobite church of Syria.’
    • ‘All the different sects within the Syrian Christian community - Syro-Malabar, Syro-Malankara, Jacobite, Orthodox as well as Caldean - had their original liturgy in Syriac.’

Origin

Early 15th century: from medieval Latin Jacobita, from the name of Jacobus Baradaeus, a 6th-century Syrian monk.

Pronunciation

Jacobite

/ˈdʒækəˌbaɪt//ˈjakəˌbīt/