Definition of itinerant in English:

itinerant

adjective

  • Traveling from place to place.

    ‘itinerant traders’
    • ‘Both men had unorthodox, itinerant upbringings.’
    • ‘A restless, itinerant soul, he didn't stay in Symington long, setting up shop in a small family-run hotel in Ayr.’
    • ‘This is not to say we didn't get our share of itinerant whackos.’
    • ‘Their earliest pictures showed life among itinerant farm workers.’
    • ‘In the 1890s Montrealers bought milk, ice, bread, buns, fries and popcorn from itinerant street vendors.’
    • ‘Community workers sought smoking gun evidence of police harassment of itinerant youth and they say it's in the form of a big ugly pile of tickets.’
    • ‘The partnership built up a country clientele through itinerant trading with a hawker's licence.’
    • ‘Remember how, in response to the depredations of bandits, the villagers hired as protectors seven itinerant warriors.’
    • ‘Serving mostly itinerant and homeless women, many of whom have mental difficulties, Chez Doris is accepting donations.’
    • ‘The most obvious category of jobs of this kind is that of itinerant jobs, such as a commercial traveller.’
    • ‘These changes, which are more visible now, have been noted by many itinerant researchers.’
    • ‘Many doctors were itinerant wanderers - Hippocrates among them.’
    • ‘As Ward writes, itinerant labourers were prone to ‘vary long periods of hard work by short bouts of tremendous drunkenness’.’
    • ‘Taking a page from itinerant revivalists, he traveled the country on lecture tours, organizing schools and voluntary associations.’
    • ‘He's also got a deep-blues vocal delivery, and comes across as a real genuine, home-schooled itinerant character.’
    • ‘Recently, itinerant workers - some illegal immigrants - have moved into the trade, at the risk of being exploited by gangmasters.’
    • ‘We have had our share of itinerant carpetbaggers who had dubious magistrate credentials.’
    • ‘Soon the word spread, and itinerant travelers began to squat there.’
    • ‘Private accounts are not going to turn the nation's graybeards into itinerant millionaires anytime soon.’
    • ‘The alert follows a flood of complaints about itinerant traders who charge extortionate prices for bitumen coverings for drives.’
    travelling, peripatetic, wandering, wayfaring, roving, roaming, rambling, touring, nomadic, gypsy, migrant, migratory, ambulatory
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noun

  • A person who travels from place to place.

    • ‘The media widely reported the incident and China's policy on the detention and removal of itinerants was reformed.’
    • ‘Motherwell, who have been selling the family silver of late, fielded a team of itinerants and youngsters alongside the few remaining familiar faces.’
    • ‘Three disused sites in the city centre, on Leeds Road and Halifax Road, were invaded by itinerants during March.’
    • ‘Later, we went for a wander along the mall - as usual, dozens of itinerants were in evidence.’
    • ‘I don't want to give the impression that such visits by itinerants were frequent.’
    • ‘Mr Hunt, meanwhile, says residents have been worried both by the quad bike riding and the noise caused by the itinerants since their arrival.’
    • ‘But typically they live as solitary itinerants wandering across the land, relying on daily charity from pious Hindus.’
    • ‘Prior to Fox's visit, nearly thirty itinerants had travelled to Barbados, most of whom stayed several weeks.’
    • ‘My parents were itinerants, travelling from farm to station to farm to station… you get the idea.’
    • ‘Local Indigenous leaders appear to abhor the behaviour of itinerants and town youth, but have lost the authority and perhaps the will to deal with it.’
    • ‘The men were a mixed crew, many of them itinerants, and Bill Clarke had no choice but to rule them with an iron hand.’
    • ‘Pat loves the haggle that goes with buying and selling a car; he calls his breed the last true itinerants.’
    • ‘They have been replaced by itinerants, travelling in big American pick-ups towing huge, gaudy modern caravans.’
    • ‘Daily ritual emerges in the photographs of those itinerants who made the exodus to cities in search of a better life.’
    • ‘When the war ended these same itinerants took to the roads and even to flat-bottomed riverboats, which were both shop and home.’
    • ‘The movements of itinerants are entirely unpredictable as well as unrestrained.’
    • ‘Labor is threatening to jail habitual drunks who refuse alcohol treatment, most of them Aboriginal itinerants.’
    • ‘We would need to create the impression that we were itinerants of this sort.’
    • ‘A party of Irish itinerants travelling in around 24 vehicles arrived at the Back Lane side of the factory on Sunday evening.’
    • ‘But here's what some time-zone itinerants have picked up in their travels.’
    traveller, wanderer, wayfarer, roamer, rover, nomad, gypsy, bedouin
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Origin

Late 16th century (used to describe a judge traveling on a circuit): from late Latin itinerant- ‘traveling’, from the verb itinerari, from Latin iter, itiner- ‘journey, road’.

Pronunciation