Definition of isolation in English:

isolation

noun

  • 1The process or fact of isolating or being isolated.

    ‘the isolation of older people’
    • ‘Their relative isolation from the rest of the country means that many do not even think of politics.’
    • ‘The number of help line and awareness groups is only a reflection of increasing social isolation.’
    • ‘Racial diversity in the student body reduces the isolation experienced by faculty of color.’
    • ‘Australia's native wildlife is almost entirely endemic, having evolved in virtual isolation from the rest of the world.’
    • ‘As a corollary, corridors of suitable habitat should reduce patch isolation, thereby decreasing species loss and enhancing colonization.’
    • ‘This suggested a growing mistrust of political institutions and a sense of isolation from the decision-making process.’
    • ‘As a consequence, Libya gradually overcame its international isolation.’
    • ‘First, his visit ends the international isolation imposed on Syria since the passing of UN Resolution 1559 in 2004.’
    • ‘In addition to physical pain, dying patients often experience social isolation, psychological stress and spiritual crises.’
    • ‘Using families' natural support systems to reduce social isolation may be of great help.’
    • ‘Diplomatically, Britain had been cornered and her splendid isolation was more discomforting than her solitary magnificence.’
    • ‘But Libya does want American participation - both for economic reasons and to end its diplomatic isolation.’
    • ‘A general boycott will help this necessary process of international isolation.’
    • ‘The North has been making a concerted effort to end its diplomatic isolation since last year.’
    • ‘The Government recognises that New Zealand's relative geographical isolation does not provide immunity from the threat of terrorism.’
    • ‘Of greater interest is that our analysis shows a pattern of isolation by distance.’
    • ‘No longer will our students and communities need to feel disadvantaged because of isolation or shortage of resources.’
    • ‘Coverdale withdraws into increasing isolation from the modern world.’
    • ‘But those who are willing to put out the effort can always experience relative travel isolation.’
    • ‘Third, a Mantel test was used to assess the hypothesis of genetic isolation by geographic distance.’
    solitariness, loneliness, friendlessness, lack of contact, aloneness
    remoteness, seclusion, loneliness, inaccessibility
    separation, segregation, setting apart, keeping apart
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An instance of isolating something, especially a compound or microorganism.
      • ‘All animal handling, VBL treatments and sperm isolations were performed at one laboratory by one technician.’
      • ‘Nuclei isolations and transcription assays were performed as previously described.’
      • ‘A chemist may get a prize for discovering oxygen or even a patent on the process used for its isolation.’
      • ‘Gastric lavage for isolation of M tuberculosis is a well accepted method.’
      • ‘National Institute of Virology, Pune has carried out serological investigations and virus isolations in different parts of the country.’
      • ‘The rise in isolations in our series exceeded the rise in submitted blood cultures.’
      • ‘Similar results were obtained from at least two independent PCR assays of two independent chromatin isolations.’
      • ‘Petals were detached from three flowers, pooled and used for mRNA isolation.’
      • ‘Plant tissues to be used for RNA isolation were collected directly into liquid N 2.’
      • ‘These latter bands were reconfirmed by multiple isolations and PCR-amplifications of VMA1 from genomic DNA initially derived from single cell cultures.’
      • ‘Cell lines were maintained as directed by the source, and DNA isolations were performed using Wizard genomic DNA purification (Promega).’
      • ‘Genomic DNA isolation and purification followed either a modified Chelex or phenol-chloroform protocol.’
      • ‘Samples from all the treatments were harvested at the indicated times and total RNA isolation was performed.’
      • ‘All the steps in the isolation procedure were carried out at 4°C.’
      • ‘Here we report the isolation of mutations in the Drosophila Tap 42 gene.’
      • ‘Total RNA isolation and Northern analysis were performed according to standard protocols.’
      • ‘Each step in the curing procedures was monitored by electrophoresis of plasmid isolations.’
      • ‘The pre - and post-chlorination bacterial isolations are presented in Table 2.’
      • ‘All proviral DNA isolations were processed in P3 laboratory facilities.’
      • ‘The accumulation of viscous polysaccharides in the mycelia of S. commune often interferes with genomic DNA isolations.’
    2. 1.2[as modifier] Denoting a hospital or ward for patients with contagious or infectious diseases.
      • ‘His working group has also called for a return to isolation hospitals of the type built to deal with TB last century.’
      • ‘His wife sent him to the local isolation hospital but no patients would share the same ward with him.’
      • ‘During all the nine weeks he was being barrier nursed in an isolation ward.’
      • ‘Briefly, all patients with community-acquired pneumonia and fever are admitted to the isolation wards.’
      • ‘Late closure of isolation wards led to infection of visitors and spread of the disease to the community.’
      • ‘Mpumalanga yesterday opened an emergency isolation ward at the Rob Ferreira Hospital to treat ten cases.’
      • ‘The land in question is the former isolation hospital in Main Road, Dovercourt.’
      • ‘The median number of AFB isolation rooms was 4.’
      • ‘The isolation ward patients all wear mask themselves, we wear M95 masks when we work in those areas.’
      • ‘As SARS infection could not be excluded the patient was transferred directly to an isolation ward on the same day.’
      • ‘According to Chang, air pressure in the isolation wards is lower than the air pressure outside the wards.’
      • ‘No quality restrictions were imposed on studies using isolation wards or nurse cohorting.’
      • ‘These children have typhoid, they should be in isolation, but the isolation hospital was looted.’
      • ‘Swindon Council says the centre, which used to be an isolation hospital, was being closed and demolished because it was outdated.’
      • ‘This time it's the isolation ward instead of TB and Nokwanda will most likely never leave this hospital again.’
      • ‘A surveyor's report found that the smallpox isolation hospital at Winterburn was in a poor state.’
      • ‘She spent nine days in an isolation ward at North Manchester General Hospital and underwent a series of tests.’
      • ‘Robyn was in an isolation ward at the hospital over the weekend and doctors hoped she could be released on Monday.’
      • ‘This one would need her to be hospitalized in an isolation ward for a few weeks.’
      • ‘This served Joyce Green and other isolation hospitals in the area.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from isolate, partly on the pattern of French isolation.

Pronunciation:

isolation

/ˌīsəˈlāSH(ə)n/