Definition of island in English:

island

noun

  • 1A piece of land surrounded by water.

    • ‘The world's smallest lizard has been discovered on a tiny Caribbean island off the coast of the Dominican Republic.’
    • ‘Their latest stop was on the beautiful holiday island of Phi Phi in Thailand.’
    • ‘Some small uninhabited Pacific islands that have existed for centuries have disappeared.’
    • ‘Cuba is an island nation located on the northern rim of the Caribbean Sea.’
    • ‘In Bangladesh, coastal areas and some offshore islands have been severely affected by floods as well as violent storms.’
    • ‘She longed to visit the island in the middle.’
    • ‘No one can ever be really available on our imaginary Pacific desert island mentioned earlier.’
    • ‘The game still starts off with you escorting an inquisitive journalist to a remote tropical island.’
    • ‘Soviet troops seized the islands at the end of the war.’
    • ‘The tiny uninhabited island is in the Sea of Japan halfway between the Korean Peninsula and Japan.’
    • ‘The Keys are a group of coral islands stretching 100 miles from the tip of mainland Florida.’
    • ‘A passenger jet crashes on a deserted Pacific island.’
    • ‘Today's birds descend from a generalist ancestral finch that invaded the islands from mainland Ecuador.’
    • ‘The first Europeans to visit these uninhabited islands thought they were bewitched.’
    • ‘Together with the slightly more mountainous Antigua, they make up the island nation.’
    • ‘The water which surrounds the island is a rich fishing ground for tuna and mackerel.’
    • ‘A princess visits an island inhabited by two tribes.’
    • ‘A tiny speck in the Sulu Sea offers a little known island paradise.’
    • ‘Forced transmigration programs involved moving people from the densely populated island of Java to the eastern provinces.’
    • ‘Delegates from around 190 nations began the session Monday on the Indonesian resort island of Bali.’
    isle, islet
    atoll
    key
    cay
    ait, holm
    skerry
    archipelago, chain, group
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A thing resembling an island, especially in being isolated, detached, or surrounded in some way.
      ‘the university is the last island of democracy in this country’
      • ‘He said the true meaning of civilisation and globalisation meant the adoption of the local culture and to blend with the local culture and not to make an isolated island of cultures.’
      • ‘The castle was an isolated island which did not need the outside world.’
      • ‘Cambridge is very much an isolated island of student life outside UW.’
      • ‘The designers built the seating areas in tiers to create isolated islands suited to parties of different sizes.’
      • ‘They make the Web a web rather than a series of isolated islands.’
      • ‘Marketing, sales and service continue to work as separate entities, each with their own isolated islands of customer information.’
      • ‘One would think that France was an isolated island on a completely different planet.’
      • ‘Like many other units, this particular park offers an island of serenity and beauty in a region struggling to define its future.’
      • ‘But if the Tories are really serious about power they must win back seats like Cambridge, an island of Liberal Democrat yellow in a surrounding sea of East Anglian blue.’
      • ‘The Western system functions by allowing small islands of dissent in an overwhelming sea of conformist propaganda.’
      • ‘For example, a head line with several islands indicates someone who is uncertain and has difficulty in communicating their ideas.’
      • ‘Most of the tables are outside in the garden, on separate isolated islands surrounded by flourishing plants that are apparently well taken care of.’
      • ‘In 1393, Great Turnovo - the capital of Bulgaria remained as an isolated island in the ocean of Turkish possessions.’
      • ‘Amid the chaos in the island of Manhattan, it seems like most urbanites tend to isolate themselves into islands of their own.’
    2. 1.2 A freestanding kitchen cupboard unit with a countertop, allowing access from all sides.
      • ‘Beyond this, the kitchen is fitted with a range of wall and floor units, a centre island, recessed lighting and tiled worktops.’
      • ‘Typical appliances rested on a long line of marble counters surrounding an island in the middle of the room.’
      • ‘She flipped it open once again as she seated herself on a stool next to the island in the kitchen.’
      • ‘There was a sparkling clean kitchen, with a black island in the middle.’
      • ‘Ovens are built into the kitchen side of the island so they can't be seen from the rest of the room.’
  • 2Anatomy
    A detached portion of tissue or group of cells.

    Compare with islet
    • ‘Stromal retraction between tumor islands and dermal connective tissue was observed in 12 cases.’
    • ‘It is not known how the cholesterol and fatty acids enter the cells of lipid islands.’
    • ‘Two cases had occasional islands of pancreatic acini and islets of Langerhans.’
    • ‘They are composed of islands, large nests, or sheets of tumor cells forming ductules, which are lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium.’
    • ‘The cell islands were further demarcated from the surrounding stroma by reticulin condensation around groups of cells.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]literary
  • Make into or like an island; place or enclose on or as on an island; isolate.

    ‘islanded among the new stores, these houses were valuable property’
    ‘the house where she has been islanded’
    • ‘It was the bigger residents of the islanded lakes that made the grade in a generally tough event.’
    • ‘Uncompromisingly long takes and silent sequences introduce us to a bizarre, islanded world.’
    • ‘Everyone is islanded off in their own little world.’
    • ‘At one end of the table was a fowl which had been boiled for four hours; at the other, a hot pork pie, islanded in liquor.’
    • ‘Tata Power has a unique islanding system that snaps its grid off from the state's supply the moment disturbances threaten to disrupt it.’

Origin

Old English īegland, from īeg island (from a base meaning watery, watered) + land. The change in the spelling of the first syllable in the 16th century was due to association with the unrelated word isle.

Pronunciation:

island

/ˈīlənd/

Definition of Island in English:

Island

proper noun

Pronunciation:

Island

/ˈēsland/