Definition of introduce in US English:

introduce

verb

[with object]
  • 1Bring (something, especially a product, measure, or concept) into use or operation for the first time.

    ‘various new taxes were introduced’
    ‘measures were introduced to help families with children’
    • ‘Now, East Lancashire Hospitals Trust bosses have introduced a number of measures to combat the problem.’
    • ‘It has become a laudable tradition among all chipset developers to introduce their new products in series rather than singly.’
    • ‘This is a great place to introduce products and measure their popularity.’
    • ‘With quality in mind, a plethora of industries have showcased their products at the venue, which has also turned out a testing ground for introducing new products as also selling new concepts.’
    • ‘We know the individual can make a difference by introducing simple measures about the home such as switching off a light or turning the TV off standby.’
    • ‘It is clear that there are now more new products introduced every year than before.’
    • ‘At least two new flavours and products are introduced each year after extensive taste tests.’
    • ‘The move is one of a number of measures introduced by Burnley Council as part of a shake-up of their waste collection services.’
    • ‘Family tax benefits are just one of the many measures introduced by the government that effectively lower the average rate of tax.’
    • ‘It is hoped the order will reduce the chance of more strict drought measures being introduced next year.’
    • ‘The measures included introducing a zero tax rate for reinvested profit, reducing income tax rates and raising the non-taxable minimum by 10 per cent.’
    • ‘The bills introduce a number of measures to provide greater scrutiny of people, goods, and craft arriving in, and leaving from, New Zealand.’
    • ‘The tax measure was introduced in the last federal budget.’
    • ‘Boozing in the street could cost drinkers £500 under tough new measures introduced this week.’
    • ‘Traffic calming measures were introduced last year when engineers reduced the width of Main Road at key points to encourage motorists to slow down.’
    • ‘In the past few years, Swindon police, in partnership with the council, has introduced a number of measures to halt the tide of yobbish behaviour.’
    • ‘To cut costs, many retailers have been introducing productivity-boosting measures, such as self-service checkout lines.’
    • ‘The reasons for introducing these measures remain valid and the parking restrictions are now being enforced by the city council on an impartial basis.’
    • ‘I know a few years ago a Bombay physician had introduced this concept of getting together in a group and laughing, and it has caught on in other cities in India also.’
    • ‘Initial modules introduce less complex concepts and situations, which are built upon by progressively more complex negotiation scenarios and strategies.’
    institute, initiate, launch, inaugurate, establish, found, instigate, put in place
    propose, put forward, suggest, submit, advance, table, move
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Bring (a new plant, animal, or disease) to a place and establish it there.
      ‘a cold-resistant strain of sugar cane was introduced to Louisiana’
      • ‘It is understood the disease was then introduced to the trout lake by an angler who had been fishing for carp.’
      • ‘Sheep and goats were probably introduced to Britain during the Neolithic period with other domestic livestock.’
      • ‘So hazardous was the approach to this remote piece of rock that it's believed foxes were never introduced to Buldir.’
      • ‘It is as if the disease was only introduced to give the appearance of three dimensions.’
      • ‘Originally native to the eastern United States and Canada, this insect was apparently introduced to Europe after the Second World War.’
      • ‘It is estimated that about one new species is introduced to the Great Lakes each year.’
      • ‘The plant was introduced to Europe in the 1700s and then to America.’
      • ‘Hundreds of non-indigenous species are introduced to different habitats each day.’
      • ‘But it was the pigs, rats and monkeys introduced by man that ravaged the dodo eggs and chicks and led to the bird's extinction.’
      • ‘The fox was introduced to Australia and has caused havoc to the native animal population.’
      • ‘Turkeys were introduced to Europe from the Americas in the 16th Century.’
      • ‘Rabbits were introduced to the Macquarie Islands, far to the southwest of New Zealand, to provide food.’
      • ‘You have to repeat this for two weeks if you are planning to introduce exotic fishes and plants.’
      • ‘Donkeys were introduced to the United States with Mexican explorers.’
      • ‘Cattle and sheep can also introduce disease to other animals and overgraze native vegetation needed by wildlife.’
      • ‘In the wake of that success, the moth was also introduced to other islands, such as Montserrat and Antigua.’
      • ‘The USDA regulates plants, plant products, and other organisms that may introduce plant diseases or pests.’
      • ‘The settlers introduced oak trees in the smarter parts, and they've come to value the indigenous vegetation that they were originally very dismissive of.’
      • ‘In contrast, many pest species are introduced to the region and flourish with the large expanses of a single food source.’
      • ‘But it may not be good for its fellow killer whales because it may introduce diseases.’
    2. 1.2introduce something to Bring a subject to the attention of (someone) for the first time.
      ‘the program is a bid to introduce opera to the masses’
      • ‘Initially they intend introducing the sport to children and adults as a leisure activity but ultimately they are looking for Limerick gymnasts to sign up to the ever growing national squad.’
      • ‘The boys brought baseball equipment and introduced the game to the village.’
      • ‘Its value lies in introducing its subject matter to those without special knowledge.’
      • ‘It's not even introducing the subject to most kids.’
      • ‘Has that helped at all, at least introduced the subject to people?’
      • ‘But it is not the usual type of textbook that presents how a discipline currently sees itself and introduces its subject matter to beginners.’
      • ‘To some extent it was this subject that first introduced Chinese films to international audiences.’
      • ‘For subjects like environmental studies and science, a topic was introduced to all the groups simultaneously but the follow-up tasks were done individually or in pairs or in small groups.’
      • ‘Recorded earlier this year, it catches Young introducing his cycle to an attentive Irish audience.’
      • ‘Several vendors have released products introducing the concept of a mid-tier application server to the screen-scraping market.’
      make conversant, make familiar, acquaint, get up to date, keep up to date
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Present (a new piece of legislation) for debate in a legislative assembly.
      • ‘At least every time he stood to introduce some business law legislation, he showed some enthusiasm and understanding.’
      • ‘I have faith in the people of the United States to get beyond the present administration and the present situation, and, ultimately, to introduce such progressive legislation.’
      • ‘She introduced the legislation because of fears the rules on student visas were too lax, and are turning the US into a ‘sieve’.’
      • ‘He suggested that legislation and regulations introduced by her would solve that problem.’
      • ‘He told a conference yesterday that he wants prices for high speed Internet access to come down, or the Government would introduce regulations and legislation to bring prices down.’
      • ‘If it doesn't like a particular scheme it can immediately introduce legislation to close it down - and the rules will apply retrospectively.’
      • ‘Supporters of this bill plan to introduce legislation in 2002 to include Medicaid.’
      • ‘Well, my next guest introduced legislation to create a student's Bill of rights.’
      • ‘Yet inevitably some will remain suspicious that the present crisis will be used as a pretext for introducing legislation which will erode our civil liberties.’
      • ‘A bill was introduced into the legislative assembly that would have banned the use of powdered latex gloves throughout the state.’
      • ‘US gun control, as presented in legislation introduced by Democrats, is a joke.’
      • ‘Draft regulations that will govern the Bill seeking to introduce legislation to control smoking in public places have been published for consultation.’
      • ‘Almost 70 pieces of secondary legislation were also introduced.’
      • ‘Changes in the personnel might see a partial reversal of that, allowing up to 30 states to introduce legislation banning or limiting abortion.’
      • ‘Private members, however, would be free to introduce such legislation, which would be subjected to debate and a free vote.’
      • ‘It is not possible to conceive of a practice whereby Government binds itself as a matter of law to consult before introducing primary legislation.’
      • ‘The past two weeks have shown how far we have travelled in the debate about introducing legislation in Scotland aimed at protecting people from the damage that passive smoking causes to health.’
      • ‘Human reproductive cloning is banned in countries that have introduced regulations or legislation restricting it.’
      • ‘Once you introduce laws, bylaws, legislation and regulations you are immediately restricting people's freedom, which is unavoidable.’
      • ‘In California, one assemblyman just introduced legislation to legalize same-sex marriage.’
      propose, put forward, suggest, submit, advance, table, move
      View synonyms
  • 2Make (someone) known by name to another in person, especially formally.

    ‘I hope to introduce Jenny to them very soon’
    • ‘‘Let me introduce us to you more formally,’ he offered, taking them closer to the table.’
    • ‘She could not remember his name since the time Catherine introduced him to her.’
    • ‘So the cabbie introduced me to this man, whose name I have lost, and left.’
    • ‘She introduced me to a group of girls, whose names became a blur by the fifth girl.’
    • ‘Harpo, the eldest son, falls in love with a young girl named Sofia, and introduces her to the family already swelling and pregnant.’
    • ‘Then she formally introduced me to Angela and a man about two or three years older than me, who wore a shiny grey suit, lots of jewellery and had very white teeth.’
    • ‘In fact, he had never told her his name; somebody else had introduced him.’
    • ‘She wished to know your name… and she requested that I introduce you to her.’
    • ‘Booth got in touch with him and introduced him to her grandmother, then 99 years old.’
    • ‘James introduced her and the boys - her name is Felicity and the two boys are her sons.’
    • ‘By now Scott was merely killing time and she remained close to him as he mingled among familiar faces every so often introducing her to someone by her first name.’
    • ‘I run into some nefarious character, I don't even want to mention his name, who introduces me to Madam Alex.’
    • ‘My mother soon entered the room and formally introduced us, though obviously he knew my name and I knew his.’
    • ‘A mutual friend formally introduced him to her during the course of the evening.’
    • ‘If Hector and Nolan knew each other, why didn't she introduce us instead of having me asking him for his name?’
    • ‘Three weeks ago, Debbie Scott, who just spoke so passionately, introduced me to a remarkable young man.’
    • ‘When Amy had settled in, Kevin formally introduced her to the others and led her to the training room.’
    • ‘‘That would be me,’ Jessica said with a small frown, when Michael showed no intention of formally introducing her.’
    • ‘He introduced me to his salesman, a man named Sol.’
    • ‘But the plan is to introduce her as Tiffany, and not reveal her name.’
    present, present formally, make known
    View synonyms
  • 3Insert or bring into something.

    ‘a device that introduces chlorine into the pool automatically’
    • ‘And we introduce another device which would allow the surgeon to be able to see where on the heart they're working.’
    • ‘Doctors introduce the device through a small puncture in the groin area before entering the Merci Retriever into an artery leading to the brain.’
    • ‘This introduces rotatory forces through the knee which can aggravate the condition.’
    • ‘DNA replication is known to introduce short insertion and deletion mutations through various forms of strand misalignment.’
    • ‘He recalls the time when miners from Wales dug one of the bore holes, which is still used today, and when chlorine was introduced at the treatment works.’
    • ‘The cellular physiology workstation may optionally comprise injecting means for introducing an injection solution into the cell before and during analysis.’
    • ‘We conclude that Minos can be instrumental for completion of the effort to introduce useful insertions into all known genes of D. melanogaster.’
    • ‘The electrode is introduced through a needle inserted into a large vein in an arm or the neck.’
    insert, inject, put, place, push, force, drive, shoot, feed
    instil, infuse, inject, add, insert, bring
    View synonyms
  • 4Occur at the start of; open.

    ‘a longer, more lyrical opening that introduces her first solo’
    • ‘The first movement, an aria for soprano and alto soloists, has a gorgeous instrumental ritornello that introduces the contrapuntal solo parts.’
    • ‘As the swampy beat introduced the song, there was a gradually building cheer as people clicked to the songs identity.’
    • ‘For ‘Zen,’ for instance, he created that drum loop which introduces the song.’
    1. 4.1 (of a person) provide an opening explanation or announcement for (a television or radio program, book, etc.).
      • ‘He introduces one song with ‘Anyway’, another with ‘Well’.’
      • ‘But then, he did not stop at introducing the book.’
      • ‘It was ‘de rigueur,’ practically, to introduce your next song with a musicological essay - we all did it.’
      • ‘Granada TV frontman Anthony Wilson is the master of ceremonies who will introduce an action-packed programme.’
      • ‘He introduces a song of heart-warming beauty ‘Scorn Not His Simplicity’ and dedicates it to every proud parent of a disabled child.’
      • ‘Jay introduced the song and then you can see him getting up right away like he was walking out on it.’
      • ‘Caroline, who is a singer and takes part in local talent competitions, was never able to get up on stage and introduce her own songs.’
      • ‘When I stepped up to open the session and introduce the speaker it had been 4 p.m.’
      • ‘He will introduce screenings of some of his films and conduct a movie masterclass with the audience at Pictureville Cinema.’
      • ‘No less than 31 presenters have been recruited to introduce programmes throughout the festival, and some will stay on with their own studio shows afterwards.’
      • ‘Barnes tries to introduce the song, but the drummer's making a little too much racket for his liking.’
      • ‘The audience held on to her every word as she introduced each song.’
      • ‘He was too shy to show his face, even as the superstar sing-song rapper introduced him and thousands of teens screamed his name.’
      • ‘Then as Matt is introducing a song - explaining, as he lifts up his sleeve, showing a big tattoo of John Lee Hooker, about how he got this tattoo the day JLH died and how it was the best tattoo in the world.’
      • ‘His charisma often focuses attention on himself, even when he is introducing a musician to the public in a humorous or warm way.’
      • ‘The conductor, wearing a dress I had seen her conduct in many times before, opened the proceedings by introducing the choir, and ‘what it stands for’ to the audience.’
      • ‘He has already introduced race nights, fancy dress parties and a pop quiz to the award-winning boozer.’
      • ‘You could barely hear him introducing the songs.’
      • ‘In his talk introducing the book, Neil challenged this view.’
      announce, present, give an introduction to
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘bring (a person) into a place or group’): from Latin introducere, from intro- ‘to the inside’ + ducere ‘to lead’.

Pronunciation

introduce

/ˌɪntrəˈd(j)us//ˌintrəˈd(y)o͞os/