Definition of intolerance in English:

intolerance

noun

  • 1Unwillingness to accept views, beliefs, or behavior that differ from one's own.

    ‘a struggle against religious intolerance’
    ‘an intolerance of dissent’
    • ‘Who is going to help the victims of religious intolerance in Britain's immigrant communities?’
    • ‘And, that issue aside, it is not intolerance to argue against opinions you think are wrong.’
    • ‘From the opening games, spectators and the general public have understood the message that racism, intolerance and discrimination have no place in the game.’
    • ‘This project introduces children to difficult issues such as racism and intolerance in our society.’
    • ‘He beckoned us to be more understanding and tolerant, at a time when intolerance abounded.’
    • ‘But, how could this be done without revisiting the World War I experience of oppressive intolerance?’
    • ‘Indeed, while the evidence is thin, it suggests that evangelical schools promote higher levels of civic engagement but also greater intolerance.’
    • ‘In their declaration, participants condemned all organisations and individuals promoting hatred or acts of racism, xenophobia, discrimination or intolerance.’
    • ‘Only that way can both adherents and innocents alike learn the wages of allowing their country to be hijacked by agents of intolerance.’
    • ‘People are killing each other because of bigotry, fanaticism and prejudice, so why are we adding to the burden of intolerance?’
    • ‘By reaching out and protecting each other from intolerance and injustice, we hope to forge a better future for our children.’
    • ‘Only that link can effect the enormous changes needed and thwart the dark forces of intolerance that today threaten the fragile freedoms of the South.’
    • ‘These kinds of inappropriate statements only create more religious hatred, intolerance, discrimination and racism against Muslims.’
    • ‘Some theorists expect that the same forces may also drive space colonization, as religious intolerance has not been eliminated in the centuries since these events.’
    • ‘It is a Muslim society that challenges stereotypes of Muslim puritanism, narrowness, and intolerance.’
    • ‘The implication is that this is needless suffering or, even worse, suffering caused by human beings with their dogmatic religious intolerance.’
    • ‘But such condemnation of violence and intolerance on campus is rarely backed up by facts and figures.’
    • ‘They are supposed to have been the epitome of self-righteousness and intolerance, a black stain on the history of the Catholic Church in particular and Western civilization in general.’
    • ‘This aggressive new strain of right-wing religious zealotry is actually a throwback to the intolerance that led to the creation of America in the first place.’
    • ‘He can be sure that when he does, someone will accuse him of intolerance.’
    sensitivity, hypersensitivity, oversensitivity
    bigotry, narrow-mindedness, small-mindedness, parochialism, provincialism, insularity, fanaticism, dogmatism, illiberality
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1An inability to eat a food or take a drug without adverse effects.
      ‘young children with lactose intolerance’
      [count noun] ‘he may have a food intolerance to dairy products’
      • ‘If you fail all the allergy tests, than a food intolerance is probably to blame.’
      • ‘We have continued to try and treat a variety of the problems that we see in these patients, one being the orthostatic intolerance.’
      • ‘Fructose intolerance involves several non-specific symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain and tension, gas, excess belching, and diarrhea.’
      • ‘The most common food intolerances are wheat or gluten, dairy, corn, soy, eggs and peanuts.’
      • ‘This insulin suppression testing was intended to identify the one third of the population who were most insulin resistant and most likely to develop glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease.’
      • ‘Long-term intolerance, undiagnosed, can cause serious health problems.’
      • ‘A health practitioner should deal with wheat allergy or wheat intolerance, whether the allergy is manifested with products containing white flour or with products containing whole grain wheat.’
      • ‘Of these, how many have been seen by a gastroenterologist before being labelled, and how many have had lactose intolerance excluded?’
      • ‘No correlation of fasting glucose with birth weight was noted and there was a positive trend of glucose intolerance with increasing weight.’
      • ‘Consult with an allergist to pinpoint true food allergies and intolerances.’
      • ‘In this process the human proteins are inactivated and agglomerates are formed which may be the cause of the observed intolerance to the injection solutions.’
      • ‘Adults from Eastern countries have, for genetic reasons, much lower levels of lactase, and so lactose intolerance, rather than milk intolerance is really the normal state.’
      • ‘A fasting or elimination test can be performed to determine if diarrhea is caused by a food allergy or intolerance.’
      • ‘An increased sensitivity or intolerance to certain foods, may also contribute.’
      • ‘The campaign is to raise awareness of the problems associated with cow's milk intolerance.’
      • ‘There is a difference between wheat/gluten allergy (celiac disease) and wheat intolerance, but the foods we avoid are the same.’
      • ‘The replacement of milk with yogurt or fermented dairy products may allow for better digestion and decreased diarrhea and other symptoms associated with lactose intolerance.’
      • ‘People with coeliac disease have an intolerance to gluten.’
      • ‘It transpired that the child had weak bones caused by scurvy and certain dietary intolerances.’
      • ‘The simplest (and cheapest) way to test your child for food intolerance is to remove the food from their diet for at least five days.’

Pronunciation:

intolerance

/ˌinˈtäl(ə)rəns/