Definition of intervention in English:

intervention

noun

  • 1The action or process of intervening.

    ‘they are plants that grow naturally without human intervention’
    • ‘They were frustratingly denied by late deflections or timely interventions.’
    • ‘Most lyrical of all his interventions there is the restaurant on the edge of the vineyards.’
    • ‘Ecosystems are delicate and complex, easily disrupted by clumsy interventions.’
    • ‘As economic interventions go it must surely rank as one of the biggest failures in history.’
    • ‘They eagerly, even desperately, seek to create or receive such interventions.’
    • ‘We can make our observations and interventions on behalf of the emerging poem or story.’
    • ‘What we have here then is an extraordinary range of fairly informed interventions.’
    • ‘Also the possibilities of realist strategies as radical interventions should be broached.’
    • ‘However, these incentives are often distorted by interventions in the market.’
    • ‘The result is one of the simplest artistic interventions I have ever seen and one of the most unforgettable.’
    • ‘Behind the parade of diets and workout regimes there have been more direct interventions.’
    • ‘Research shows it's less helpful in normal labours and can lead to unnecessary interventions.’
    • ‘Second the costs of interventions, both explicit and implicit, did not become excessive.’
    • ‘Not only had he given his all going forward, he had helped out at the back with telling interventions.’
    • ‘Many have raised several matters that Ann's kindly interventions have resolved.’
    • ‘Studies have shown that the tree would be safe with only minor interventions.’
    1. 1.1 Interference by a country in another's affairs.
      ‘the administration was reported to be considering military intervention’
      • ‘I think we have to be concerned that we could have too much overkill, in terms of military intervention.’
      • ‘Globalisation accelerates both the economic and military impact of imperialist intervention.’
      • ‘While McDonald spoke of a limited operation, military intervention has a logic of its own.’
      • ‘Firstly comes direct intervention in the affairs of another country.’
      • ‘It is important to draw attention to this because it was a fully armed intervention under the Democrats.’
      • ‘This military intervention was sharply opposed from the beginning by the Polish people.’
      • ‘These alliances led to increasing intervention in the affairs of such states and to wars fought on their behalf.’
      • ‘Underlying this was a fear of French intervention in Irish affairs.’
      • ‘It was precisely the product of 100 years of brutal intervention by colonial and imperialist forces.’
      • ‘We have to build a movement that demands an end to the war and an end to US imperialist intervention in the region.’
      • ‘Such military intervention served to fuel these proxy wars rather than stop them.’
      • ‘State intervention is considered quite acceptable in these circumstances.’
      • ‘Does the goal of defending or developing democracy justify military intervention and occupation of a country?’
      • ‘On my campus, there have been debates about whether any military intervention can be defended.’
      • ‘A call went out for immediate protests this weekend against the danger of U.S. military intervention.’
      • ‘Mass protests in the West will strengthen all those in the Middle East who want to resist imperialist intervention.’
      • ‘When in history has liberation ever resulted as a happy byproduct of imperialist intervention?’
      • ‘There is growing global resentment concerning Americas policy of intervention in global affairs.’
      • ‘So the other powers have been mostly happy to go along with US military intervention.’
      • ‘European countries are also strengthening their military intervention in West Africa.’
      involvement, intercession, interceding, interposing, interposition
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Action taken to improve a situation, especially a medical disorder.
      ‘two patients were referred for surgical intervention’
      • ‘Isn't this a natural event best managed without medical intervention?’
      • ‘Many interventions can be delivered through day surgery rather than lengthy hospital stays.’
      • ‘There is insufficient evidence as to whether this intervention improves cognitive performance.’
      • ‘The data will be analysed for possible trends and ways to improve and target medical intervention.’
      • ‘Now is the time for pharmacological intervention, done under medical supervision.’
      • ‘At the moment, one in three births involves complications requiring medical intervention.’
      • ‘Could it be our interventions hinder the body's strategies to heal itself?’
      • ‘Are happiness and enhanced self image the appropriate outcomes of medical intervention?’
      • ‘Box 1 shows the main interventions for urinary tract infections and sore throat.’
      • ‘One child exhibited odd behaviour and one mild respiratory depression requiring no medical intervention.’
      • ‘Some of these artists have drawn on their own experience of the effects of illness and medical intervention on their bodies.’
      • ‘Surgical intervention is required at the earliest sign of an abscess.’
      • ‘This suggests that the intervention improved clinical selection of cases for sputum sampling.’
      • ‘This condition needs medical intervention both in the form of rapid diagnosis and treatment.’
      • ‘Parents want autism to be diagnosed as early as possible, and early intervention may improve long term outcomes.’
      • ‘The internet is a feasible and powerful tool in delivering community based health interventions.’
      • ‘Lack of medical intervention can lead to disability, pain, and reduced functioning.’
      • ‘Surgical intervention or, less commonly, thrombolytic therapy is indicated.’
      • ‘More and more problems are seen as amenable to medical intervention.’
      • ‘Both treated and control groups received the same level of medical intervention.’
    3. 1.3 An occasion on which a person with an addiction or other behavioral problem is confronted by a group of friends or family members in an attempt to persuade them to address the issue.
      ‘as her health worsened, her daughters considered staging an intervention’
      • ‘Once you decide to have an intervention, planning and preparation are the keys to success.’
      • ‘When a loved one destroys himself with drink or drugs, we stage an intervention in the hope of forcing him to recognize the cost of his behavior to himself and to those who depend on him.’
      • ‘Tina claims the family was so concerned for her well-being, at one point they staged an intervention.’
      • ‘An intervention, two stints in the Betty Ford clinic and a long retreat in Oregon helped her to clean out for good.’
      • ‘In the beginning, most people who go to rehab, whether it's because of an intervention or any other reason, don't go for the right reason.’
      • ‘In the early 1990s, they staged an intervention, warning him that he was killing himself.’
      • ‘If all else fails, you may even want to arrange an intervention with people she trusts, like girlfriends who know about her obsession with weight.’
      • ‘You need an intervention to save you from yourself.’
      • ‘He came clean about his addiction for the first time after his roommates staged an intervention.’
      • ‘You're still good right now, but if you start to look skinnier, I will perform an intervention.’
      • ‘The only people bold enough to conduct an intervention are those who consider themselves very close to you.’
      • ‘There was an intervention: they told me what I meant to them and told me I was killing myself, and they hated to see that happen.’
      • ‘My housemates nearly had to wrest the CD from me and hold an intervention after I bought it and put it on 'repeat' for the next 4 days.’
      • ‘With the help of an outside counselor, the family staged an intervention, and convinced her to leave the organization.’
      • ‘Perhaps if enough of his buddies feel this way, but are afraid to say something, they might help stage an intervention.’
      • ‘She has revealed an intervention staged by her daughters finally prompted her to seek help for addiction issues.’
      • ‘But my lovely husband, like a concerned family member staging an intervention, wouldn't let me fall back into my old ways.’
      • ‘The problem was so bad it caused her co-stars to throw an intervention.’
      • ‘When someone falls off track in life, people will often form a mob for the purposes of holding an intervention.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin interventio(n-), from the verb intervenire (see intervene).

Pronunciation

intervention

/ˌɪn(t)ərˈvɛn(t)ʃ(ə)n//ˌin(t)ərˈven(t)SH(ə)n/