Definition of interrogator in US English:

interrogator

noun

  • 1A person who questions someone closely, aggressively, or formally.

    ‘he was questioned for two months by military interrogators’
    • ‘Not being an interrogator, she let it slide.’
    • ‘The interrogator began speaking through an intercom, his voice garbled in static.’
    • ‘A criminal court has been hearing testimonies, according to an interrogator at the bureau.’
    • ‘The questions were recorded from people subjected to questioning by government interrogators.’
    • ‘Given long enough, a dedicated interrogator could get enough information out of me to give them a serious edge, technology-wise.’
    • ‘Any prospective interrogators who indicated a suspicion or knowledge of these tests were disqualified.’
    • ‘He does what many smart interviewees do to their approaching interrogators.’
    • ‘He felt an urge to sink his teeth into the interrogator's flesh.’
    • ‘The director cuts from Bates to the faces of each of the interrogators.’
    • ‘Once during the interviews, even his interrogator lapsed into crediting him with more humanity than he possesses.’
  • 2A device that obtains data from a computer file, database, storage device, or terminal.

    ‘the interrogator forwards the data to a server’
    • ‘The format of the file is unchanged when it is downloaded into the interrogator.’
    • ‘The interrogator is used to retrieve the subsequently obtained data.’
    • ‘The data the interrogator collects may be used by some application such as inventory control.’
    • ‘Some commands (such as LOCK and UNLOCK) configure certain behavior or capability in the interrogator.’
    • ‘The interrogator has the facility of analyzing data on a channel-by-channel basis for any data file.’
    1. 2.1 An electronic device that transmits a signal to another device to obtain information about identity, condition, etc.
      ‘an airborne interrogator’
      • ‘In order to transmit tag data content, the interrogator must “excite” the transponder at a specific radio frequency.’
      • ‘The basic access control enables the encryption of any communication between the chip and interrogator.’
      • ‘Two-way radio transmitter-receivers called interrogators send a signal to the tag and read its response.’
      • ‘Data confusion to the interrogator (as when two or more transponders are competing for attention) may cause misreading.’
      • ‘The antenna is the part of the interrogator that radiates the radio frequency energy to, and receives energy from the transponder.’

Pronunciation

interrogator

/inˈterəˌɡādər/