Definition of intercession in English:

intercession

noun

  • 1The action of intervening on behalf of another.

    ‘through the intercession of friends, I was able to obtain her a sinecure’
    • ‘This call may or may not have had anything to do with an intercession Haughey may or may not have made to the IRA when Dunne was kidnapped for ransom.’
    • ‘Returned home he relates the incident, and only through his mother's intercession escapes a thrashing from his honest father, for telling a lie.’
    • ‘It goes with the territory and I don't seek a particular intercession on his behalf in relation to criticism.’
    • ‘‘The Bulgarian nurses sentenced to death in Libya can only partially hope for the intercession of foreign leaders visiting Tripoli,’ the article said.’
    • ‘It was only after the intercession of Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki (among others) that finally, a place was found for Mathews at SFU in the Department of Canadian Studies.’
    • ‘Besides Monferrato and parts of western Lombardy he received - through the intercession of the British negotiators - Sicily and the title of king that it conferred.’
    • ‘In 1958, thanks to Charlton Heston's intercession, he was allowed to write and direct Touch of Evil.’
    • ‘They are entitled to expect the intervention and, if necessary, intercession of their local councillor to vindicate their rights.’
    • ‘Ayyoub, however, eventually managed to join the theatre institute thanks to the timely intercession of an enlightened, artistic uncle who wrote poetry and published several collections.’
    • ‘To a certain extent that paves the way for the European Union to occupy the vacuum, but so far its attempts at intercession have cut little ice.’
    • ‘The a la carte option is opposed by the U.S. cable industry and would require government intercession.’
    • ‘It equips them to communicate, to criticise, to escape, or to interpret scripture, all without the intercession of the master-class.’
    • ‘Many different stories circulated as to how this came about, the most famous involving the intercession of a certain ‘Lady Hope’.’
    • ‘With peer intercession, colleagues of the same status level in the organization are chosen from that nurse's department or another unit.’
    • ‘Abduh was finally allowed back in Egypt in 1889, reportedly with Lord Cromer's intercession.’
    • ‘But while Mandelson's intercession may have guaranteed Prescott the interim support of Brown, it inevitably increased the momentum against him.’
    mediation, intermediation, negotiation, arbitration, conciliation, intervention, interposition, involvement, action
    pleading, petition, entreaty, supplication, good offices, agency, shuttle diplomacy
    mediatorship
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action of saying a prayer on behalf of another person.
      ‘prayers of intercession’
      • ‘On the periphery of my consciousness I could make out rows of weeping women throwing money and sprinkling rosewater at the tomb, while they made wishes, begged intercession for sick children, or just prayed.’
      • ‘Because of the doctrine of purgatory, the dead remained closely tied to the community of the living, linked by bonds of prayer and intercession.’
      • ‘The Calcutta archdiocese has sent the Vatican information on a supposedly miraculous cure through the intercession of Mother Teresa.’
      • ‘With his power and intercession, even when he seems distant, he is ready to help us carry our burdens.’
      • ‘She had already received last rights but was healed after prayers of intercession for her healing.’
      • ‘Every day I come across those who get on with the work that God has put them on earth to do without fussing, those who encourage, those who edify, those who live a life of intercession.’
      • ‘He dies on the spot for his crime, but all see his soul ascend to heaven thanks to Brendan's intercession.’
      • ‘If the Vatican then confirms a miracle has occurred after John Paul's death thanks to his intercession, he can be beatified.’
      • ‘We should resolve to maintain prayer as a priority, cultivating a spirit of intercession, praying over all we do.’
      • ‘The wedding feast at Cana teaches us the importance of intercession.’
      • ‘Had Moses' intercession brought bread from heaven and water from the rock?’
      • ‘After we have prayed for ourselves, let's get into intercession for others!’
      • ‘People are still being cured through his intercession in ways that cannot be explained by medicine or science.’
      • ‘Prayers and Masses sent her way (especially by any of you folk with a particular charism of intercession and healing) would be greatly appreciated!’
      • ‘It's entirely through St. Anne's intercession and God's protection that this house is standing and that I am still alive.’
      • ‘By this simple gesture I no longer belong to myself but am consecrated for the specific mission of being a woman of prayer and intercession for the Church.’
      • ‘Who knows how many wounded hearts will be healed through our intercession?’
      • ‘The intercession of a thousand journalists is heard as Vatican officials clarify earlier comments and insist the Pope is no closer to the Next Life than he was 24 hours ago.’
      • ‘People ask about the varieties of prayer: petition, thanksgiving, praise, and intercession.’
      • ‘If your gift is intercession or healing, she could sure use your charism right now.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin intercessio(n-), from the verb intercedere (see intercede).

Pronunciation

intercession

/ˌin(t)ərˈseSHən/