Definition of intelligible in US English:

intelligible

adjective

  • 1Able to be understood; comprehensible.

    ‘this would make the system more intelligible to the general public’
    • ‘He got a sensible and intelligible reply from Natasha.’
    • ‘That makes the lyrics intelligible without reducing the music's intensity.’
    • ‘He remains one of the rare leading academics whose work is intelligible to normal people.’
    • ‘I am quite confident that I am more intelligible than you.’
    • ‘It was a fine introduction - familiar enough to be intelligible, different enough to be intriguing.’
    • ‘Attendees are guaranteed that at least one-third of all words used will be intelligible to the general public.’
    • ‘Mine was only a middle-ranking independent school, so that's why I was relatively intelligible but prone to waffling after a few glasses of sherry.’
    • ‘Very little of it is intelligible, you understand, but don't think that stops her in the least.’
    • ‘Many of the items which are found in the media and commonly used in town speech are not intelligible to the average rural adult speaker.’
    • ‘Studies show that a person is more intelligible to an individual who can both see and hear them than for either method alone.’
    • ‘While it's clear and intelligible, a musical really deserves at least a stereo soundtrack.’
    • ‘The individual cannot make himself intelligible to anybody.’
    • ‘Before he could make any intelligible reply, the doors behind the reception slid open and a pretty secretary walked out.’
    • ‘For the last year or so of his life, he never uttered one intelligible word or showed the slightest sign of knowing who or where he was.’
    • ‘How much can you leave out while keeping it intelligible, he asks?’
    • ‘We're hardly capable of intelligible conversation, and those smiles over the mulled wine and mince pies/beer and crisps verge on the frantic.’
    • ‘I had to clear my throat a few times before I could give him an intelligible reply.’
    • ‘An examination structure, intelligible to pupils, parents and employers, must be a priority as a means of getting these proposals off the ground.’
    • ‘The surrounds are used appropriately and dialogue is clear and intelligible.’
    • ‘He came across something that struck me as intelligible.’
    comprehensible, understandable
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Philosophy Able to be understood only by the intellect, not by the senses.

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘capable of understanding’): from Latin intelligibilis, from intelligere ‘understand’ (see intelligent).

Pronunciation

intelligible

/ɪnˈtɛlədʒəb(ə)l//inˈteləjəb(ə)l/