Definition of instill in English:

instill

(British instil)

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Gradually but firmly establish (an idea or attitude, especially a desirable one) in a person's mind.

    ‘how do we instill a sense of rightness in today's youth?’
    • ‘Individual effort can lead to success in North America and this view is more instilled in people than it is in Europe.’
    • ‘Despite the debates over the years, a majority of Americans view public schools as a proper venue for instilling religious beliefs.’
    • ‘It is vital to instill an attitude of fitness at a young age.’
    • ‘We believe that this directly relates to reality programming that has been instilled in our race since its conception.’
    • ‘The full moon instilling some notion of romanticism in the minds of the stupid humans.’
    • ‘It was intended to be a horizon altering and opening experience that instilled the anthropological attitude.’
    • ‘Hunger, passion and pride are instilled in this team but they have not got to an All Ireland final on appetite alone.’
    • ‘Sounds great, but the reality of the public's actions proves that the message has not been instilled in any meaningful way.’
    • ‘Bresson instills this notion of transmutation in the core of the film.’
    • ‘Fight to the death is instilled in the soldiers more than ever before.’
    • ‘It was a phrase that had been instilled in them since they could remember.’
    • ‘A determination to overcome long odds was instilled in Whittle at an early age.’
    • ‘It's down to instilling the right beliefs in people so they see the attractions of the jobs market.’
    • ‘I think it frustrates adults when they cannot instill their ideas into teens.’
    • ‘The coach's first task was to instil belief in her abilities.’
    • ‘A strong nationalist belief was instilled in each and every member of the family.’
    • ‘They would have all remained mere installations though if life hadn't been suddenly instilled into them.’
    • ‘What sense of identity is instilled in young Christians and young Muslims in our churches and mosques?’
    • ‘We know how much, for instance, racism is instilled in people's minds to create divisions.’
    • ‘Self-confidence must be instilled in the child from an early age.’
    inculcate, implant, fix, ingrain, infuse, impress, imprint, introduce
    imbue, inspire, infuse, inculcate
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  • 2Put (a substance) into something in the form of liquid drops.

    ‘she was told how to instill eye drops’
    • ‘The surgeon also instills fluid into the joint to provide joint capsular distension and achieve the desired 1-cm joint opening.’
    • ‘Fluid is instilled around the veins, and they are then illuminated from beneath the skin with a powerful light source.’
    • ‘The saline is instilled and circulated using a small hysteroscope and a delivery system.’
    • ‘During his stay, his stomal deodorant drops were inadvertently instilled into both eyes instead of topical glaucoma treatment.’
    • ‘In group 2, the subjects had no solution instilled for the entire time they were intubated.’
    • ‘The amount of fluid drained should equal or exceed the amount instilled.’
    • ‘When patients first instil pilocarpine they often experience a brow ache, which tends to reduce with longer term use of the drug.’
    • ‘After attaching the syringe filled with lidocaine to the Pipelle, he slowly instills the anesthetic.’
    • ‘The drops are instilled to locally anesthetize the surgical eye and reduce the blink reflex in both eyes.’
    • ‘Appropriate position can be checked by aspirating through the needle used for instilling the local anesthetic.’
    • ‘A simple method is to instill a measured amount of saline to infer the volume of the wound.’
    • ‘To instill acid or saline in the lung, we introduced a cannula via a tracheotomy.’
    • ‘Open the clamp and irrigate with heparin, clamping the catheter as the last of heparin is instilled.’
    • ‘Fallopian tube patency can be confirmed by detecting an enhanced signal after instilling microbubbles into the uterine cavity.’
    • ‘Nasal lavage samples were collected at randomization and at the end of the treatment period by instilling sterile saline into each nostril and then aspirating the lavage fluid.’
    • ‘A patient attending for day case cataract surgery had phenol drops instilled into the right eye instead of bupivacaine local anaesthetic.’
    • ‘Topical anesthesia is administered by instilling anesthetic drops into the eye.’
    • ‘The circulating nurse instills tetracaine hydrochloride drops to decrease the burning sensation of the diluted povidone-iodine solution.’
    • ‘The surgeon depresses the trumpet valve to instill and remove the fluid and air from the balloon.’
    • ‘The nurse places ECG patches on the patient's chest to monitor cardiac rhythm and instills dilating eye drops in the surgical eye.’
    administer, introduce, add gradually, infuse, inject
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in instill (sense 2)): from Latin instillare, from in- ‘into’ + stillare ‘to drop’ (from stilla ‘a drop’).

Pronunciation

instill

/ɪnˈstɪl//inˈstil/