Definition of ingress in English:

ingress

noun

  • 1The action or fact of going in or entering.

    • ‘The mission was briefed and flown to hit a KC - 10 tanker over the Persian Gulf, then ingress toward Kuwait City from the southeast for a simulated bomb attack.’
    • ‘The majority of the offices have been located in linear wings, which offer easy access to cross ventilation, solar control and ingress of natural light.’
    • ‘Some facilities can limit their point of ingress and egress to only one or two entrances.’
    • ‘And so we're working on plans to create villages on the periphery of the marshes where we can provide quick egress and ingress to go into it and back out.’
    • ‘I'd gone up the ladder armed with a powerful flashlight to try to determine the point of squirrel ingress.’
    • ‘The physician's suggestion to remove one of the toilets and put a sink in its place made for a better and more functional floor plan and significantly improved ingress and egress to the area.’
    • ‘This problem arose because the relevant surfaces were not sufficiently protected to prevent such ingress and were not sufficiently accessible at all times to enable them to be cleaned properly on a regular basis.’
    • ‘Suicide doors facilitate ingress and egress, and the entire seat can slide forward to extend the cargo capacity behind it.’
    • ‘Railway systems depend on easy ingress and egress at numerous points along the route.’
    • ‘When I thought something would start within a two-hour window, there was a snowstorm and traffic snarls limiting ingress and closing media access to events.’
    • ‘He feels there may be resistance, as police don't welcome ingress into the police station as it may expose corruption.’
    • ‘To allow for easy ingress and egress, the passenger side has standard doors while the driver's side has a large electric sliding door.’
    • ‘In the first, navigable waterways fueled endless migrations and the resources to sustain human ingress.’
    • ‘In fact, most ports are designed for easy ingress and egress.’
    • ‘In the end, however, he had gained only ingress, finding it impossible to take along anything beyond the knowledge in his head and the hard-tempered capacities of his body.’
    • ‘The interior was spacious, with easy ingress and adequate access to all buttons, knobs and switches.’
    • ‘The mission was similar to what we had trained for: night launch, big-wing tanking, rendezvous, ingress, egress, more big-wing tanking, and night recovery.’
    • ‘After a period of time in which the dinosaurs could comfortably have spawned, lived, and been eliminated by space aliens, the door opened, and I gained ingress.’
    • ‘He petitioned the judge, he said I want the same ingress and egress, the same access to the courtroom, special treatment that they have.’
    • ‘The new location provides guests with improved parking and valet service, and better ingress / egress including improved access from Interstate 70.’
    entry, entrance, access, means of entry, admittance, admission
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    1. 1.1 The capacity or right of entrance.
    2. 1.2 A place or means of access; an entrance.
      • ‘Though the entrance is the same, the ingress to the entertainment area is separate from the main living space.’
      • ‘Market Street, between Sauer and Harrison streets, will form part of the square, becoming an underpass, with an ingress, or entrance, in Kort Street and egress, or exit, after Harrison Street.’
      entry, entrance, access, means of entry, admittance, admission
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    3. 1.3 The unwanted introduction of water, foreign bodies, contaminants, etc.
      • ‘The self-contained facility has a positive-pressure HVAC system to prevent the ingress of airborne contaminants and cross-contamination from other operating lines.’
      • ‘More restoration took place in 1868 following water ingress, which caused considerable damage.’
      • ‘Some apartments have been affected by water ingress.’
      • ‘Where steps occur in the valleys, small tears can be seen in the adjacent leadwork, and some of the steps are too shallow, resulting in a risk of water ingress where backing-up may occur in winter conditions.’
      • ‘Around the same time, the sclerocytes located in the outer cell layer, ingress and migrate into the posterior portion of the inner cell mass.’
      • ‘Water ingress, whether it has a high salt content or not, is the principal cause of pavement failure.’
      • ‘This is the de-lamination of facing brickwork on timber-framed houses, mainly due to the ingress of water into bricks which freezes in winter, thus expanding the moisture in the brick, causing pieces of brick to fall off.’
      • ‘If anything the foam will hide water ingress, which can cause the valley boards to rot very quickly.’
      • ‘It was possible to deal with complaints in this way, because although the occasions of water ingress were not isolated, usually no damage was caused or any damage that was caused to stock or to decoration was of a minor nature only.’
      • ‘A skin of vinylester resin is used on the outer layer to provide a barrier against the ingress of water.’
      • ‘Water ingress was a major problem in such workings, and in 1830 Admiral Lord Thomas Cochrane patented the technique of using compressed air in tunnels and caissons to exclude water.’
      • ‘The active device area must be hermetically sealed to prevent the ingress of water and oxygen that can degrade the polymer and the reactive metal cathode.’
      • ‘Plants require dominant or semidominant resistance gene alleles to specifically recognize pathogen ingress.’
      • ‘Many of the desirable durability characteristics of concrete are predicated on the development of a refined pore structure within the paste in order to resist the ingress of water, carbon dioxide, or de-icing chemicals.’
      • ‘This allowed the ingress of water which lead to the claimant's injury.’
      • ‘From about 1978, there was water ingress into the building as a result of leaks and condensation.’
      • ‘In fact, the venting of the media is very slight so that very little ingress of atmospheric pollutants is likely to access the disk surfaces; hence, one can expect a much longer life expectancy associated with this effect.’
      • ‘The mortar quality and the cracking would also allow the ingress of water into sealed cavities, which in the event of a hard frost could cause further cracking, spalling and possible failure of the brickwork.’
      • ‘A sewerage undertaker is unable to prevent connections being made to the existing system, and the ingress of water through these connections, even if this risks overloading the existing sewers.’
      • ‘If you are on the ground floor, the cause of the water ingress may be rising damp.’
      seepage, leakage, inundation, inrush, intrusion, incursion, entry, entrance
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  • 2Astronomy Astrology
    The arrival of the sun, moon, or a planet in a specified constellation or part of the sky.

    • ‘Mundane practitioners also make use of maps for the moments of New and Full Moons, eclipses and planetary ingresses (especially the Sun's ingress into Capricorn, which is considered an important predictive tool).’
    • ‘Before the ingress into Gemini, reality was universal and all-encompassing: it was embodied in all of life's dimensions, both the seen and the unseen, as well as the knowable and unknowable.’
    • ‘To the chagrin of astronomers, the atmospheres of Earth and Venus conspired to make the exact timing of ingress and egress nearly impossible, often leaving an uncertainty of nearly half a minute.’
    • ‘The Romans celebrated the Sun's ingress into Capricorn as Saturnalia, a festival which welcomed back the return of the Sun's power after the shortest day of the year.’
    • ‘She believes the mural depicts a celebration of the convergence of the sidereal and tropical zodiacs and the ingress of the vernal point into Pisces.’
    1. 2.1 The beginning of a transit.
      • ‘As the planet is completing its ingress, instead of a simple dark disk its image seems to be distorted into the form of a rain-drop, as if a thread or ligament of material has attached it to the solar limb, pulling it out of shape.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘an entrance or beginning’): from Latin ingressus, from the verb ingredi ‘enter’.

Pronunciation

ingress

/ˈinˌɡres//ˈɪnˌɡrɛs/