Definition of inform in English:

inform

verb

  • 1[reporting verb] Give (someone) facts or information; tell.

    [with object] ‘he wrote to her, informing her of the situation’
    [with object and clause] ‘they were informed that no risk was involved’
    [no object] ‘the role of television is to inform and entertain’
    • ‘Yet all too often, as we are informed, ‘so-called fact comes with its accompanying bias’.’
    • ‘His empathy had not informed him of the fact that she was staring at him, though.’
    • ‘As a matter of fact, she was petrified of people informing her of things she had done wrong, even if it came with suggestions on how to improve.’
    • ‘This was a fact I informed her of as I emerged from the bathroom clutching a towel around me and dripping all over the maroon threadbare carpet.’
    • ‘We could book our place on the lake and would have a guaranteed swim for the night; in fact we were informed that only six people were allowed to fish at night at any one time.’
    • ‘I am informed that in fact the net tax burden is 32 percent of GDP excluding rates, or 34 percent including rates.’
    • ‘The big names of the boxing media were actually dialed into the press conference - the moderator informed me of this fact.’
    • ‘If someone leaves a comment on one of your posts, you are sent an e-mail informing you of this fact, and containing the comment.’
    • ‘This fact informs us she in on the same page with today's major theatrical innovators.’
    • ‘He asked if the Baron had informed me of this fact.’
    • ‘In fact, he informed me that he was preparing to put this child on an indefinite suspension from school.’
    • ‘England, the discerning television pundits informed us, brought only two genuine world class players to this World Cup.’
    • ‘He was so happy to see me, and while we were all watching television, he informed me of something.’
    • ‘Subsequently I was informed that in fact it was not a water spout.’
    • ‘I am informed that in fact it is all explained, you just have to hunt for it.’
    • ‘Your last note acknowledges this fact and informs us that you therefore intend to sell your inventory to a third party and claim damages against us.’
    • ‘I was a little surprised to say the least when I was informed of that fact at the weekend.’
    • ‘He recycles the allegation as though it were fact, without informing us who the ‘critics’ are.’
    • ‘In fact I was informed that the people of the area, not just the parents, had the same claim on the school as the Department.’
    • ‘In fact we are reliably informed that Burnby Hall Gardens at Pocklington had never seen anything like it.’
    tell, let someone know, notify, apprise, advise, announce to, impart to, communicate to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] Give incriminating information about someone to the police or other authority.
      ‘people called a confidential hotline to inform on friends, neighbors, and family members’
      • ‘It was not only because Castro's security police spied and informed on homosexuals.’
      • ‘Word has gotten round that they informed to the police, and it seems I, as an associate, have been tarred with the same brush.’
      • ‘Deciding when to inform on wrongdoers is one of the most wrenching dilemmas we can face.’
      • ‘Western banks must be obliged by law to inform on suspicious accounts.’
      • ‘He added it was very difficult for young people to inform on friends dabbling with drugs and drink.’
      • ‘People will be encouraged to ring a new shame hotline to inform on rubbish dumpers.’
      • ‘The statement said that he was murdered because he owed the defendant £15,000, and also because he had informed on him to police in England.’
      • ‘You bet, but never to the point where I would hesitate to inform on them for the slightest infraction.’
      • ‘Those involved hope to persuade people to inform on drug dealers, putting them out of business and behind bars.’
      • ‘Not even when one of her options is to inform on him to the company without even telling him about it?’
      • ‘When arrested he referred to him because he believed that that man, who had left his house two minutes before the police arrived, had informed on him.’
      • ‘First of all the nice visit, offering them money and mobile phones to inform on people.’
      • ‘It repeated a call for offenders to surrender and for others to inform on them.’
      • ‘The staff were not expected to inform on clients but should refer matters to their superior.’
      • ‘And the terrorism bill means that the job of journalists is not to inform us but to inform on us.’
      • ‘Use them wisely, inform on your neighbours, and remember kids, dope's for dopes.’
      • ‘When he started to inform on his accomplice last year, the pathologist was called in.’
      denounce, give away, betray, incriminate, inculpate, report, tell the authorities about, tell the police about
      View synonyms
  • 2[with object] Give an essential or formative principle or quality to.

    ‘the relationship of the citizen to the state is informed by the democratic ideal’
    • ‘Our local actions should be informed by three global principles.’
    • ‘Whilst there are a number of subplots, they all inform on the main one and give the story a far wider, more epic feel than it would normally have.’
    • ‘Narrative analysis allows for the presentation of students' perceptions in a format that informs such development.’
    • ‘New development needs to be informed by the principles of urbanism.’
    • ‘Pinter has taken the analytical and oppositional qualities that informed his full-length plays and continues to apply them to every aspect of his work.’
    • ‘The writing in Mapping is top quality because it is informed by design experience.’
    • ‘In my case early experiences undoubtedly affected my motivation to engage in homelessness research, as well as informing the nature and quality of my fieldwork.’
    • ‘These pervasive and at times contradictory demands informed the salient qualities of his pictures.’
    • ‘We have found that acquiring developmental knowledge informs every aspect of one's work with a case.’
    • ‘It seems advisable that hypothesizing would be informed by principles of curiosity and empowerment, instead of by principles of power and certainty.’
    • ‘Evidence based care should be informed by the best quality evidence for the effect of interventions on clinically important longer term outcomes’
    • ‘As such, these works serve as a convincing proof of principle and have informed our own approach to the problem of dominance evolution.’
    • ‘This is a gross departure from principles that have informed our constitutional and ordinary criminal law for centuries.’
    • ‘Religion can inform every aspect of a person's life, including politics, and this, I think, is not a bad thing.’
    • ‘It identifies two periods of advocacy for an agricultural system informed by the principles of ecology.’
    • ‘This makes me wonder about the areas of Helena's life which are not informed by principles.’
    • ‘In the 19th century this quality informed the work of great English romantics.’
    • ‘In our submission, it is a legal concept informed by economic principle.’
    • ‘But you do eventually use the same principles as those informing the law - justice, fairness, equity.’
    • ‘We hope that a similar set of capacities and principles will inform future editorials.’
    suffuse, pervade, permeate, infuse, imbue, saturate
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English enforme, informe give form or shape to also form the mind of, teach from Old French enfourmer, from Latin informare shape, fashion, describe from in- into + forma a form.

Pronunciation

inform

/inˈfôrm/