Definition of infield in US English:

infield

noun

  • 1The inner part of the field of play in various sports.

    1. 1.1Baseball The area within and near the four bases.
    2. 1.2Cricket The part of the field closer to the wicket.
    3. 1.3 The players stationed in the infield, collectively.
  • 2The land around or near a farmstead, especially arable land.

    • ‘The agricultural economy was primarily based on raising cattle on forest land and cereal production on small cleared infields.’
    • ‘Thousands more can view the action from a 215-acre infield.’
    • ‘Later on, 1920-21, I deeded the 60 acres southwest of the public highway, as well as the 40 acres infields and woods on the northeast side, with the old house and barn.’
    • ‘With that, I flew off and landed in a muddy heap in the swampy infield, while the bike sagged directly to the ground.’
    • ‘The remainder of the course coils through the 130 acre infield putting a premium on handling and braking.’

adverb

  • Into or toward the inner part of the field of play.

    • ‘The home side kept up the pressure and following a Brian Kenny throw-in Padraig Murphy took possession and as he moved infield he sent a pile driver to the net in the 65th minute.’
    • ‘What will be vital is that our wide midfielders force Denmark's full-backs to play passes infield rather than allowing them bread-and-butter balls to the wingers.’
    • ‘Robinson dived over from acting half and this time Mitchell was successful with the kick from a couple of yards infield.’
    • ‘Pauleta cuts infield and tries his luck from 30 yards.’
    • ‘The cost of moving the straight track 80 meters infield is estimated at $4.9-million.’

Pronunciation

infield

/ˈɪnˌfild//ˈinˌfēld/