Definition of indict in US English:

indict

verb

[with object]North American
  • Formally accuse of or charge with a serious crime.

    ‘his former manager was indicted for fraud’
    • ‘This one a Texas grand jury indicting him on a charge of money laundering, also in connection with this case.’
    • ‘Turns out the Justice Department didn't think they had enough evidence to indict him.’
    • ‘If there's information you could indict, they will indict him when he leaves office if he lied under oath.’
    • ‘Moving on very swiftly, in relation to two charges, you were indicted to stand trial at the Central Criminal Court?’
    • ‘Here was a man accused of homosexual activities on the occasions for which he was indicted.’
    • ‘Well, if they're just indicting him for burglary, I doubt they have any direct connection yet.’
    • ‘Howard, it suggests that if they do believe that he is a suspect or may be guilty, they maybe do not have enough evidence to get a grand jury to indict him.’
    • ‘Prosecutors did not indict him on the first charge, while a court fined him 300,000 yen on the second charge.’
    • ‘The government can seize a defendant's assets immediately after indicting him, making it virtually impossible to finance an effective defense.’
    • ‘That means not only making sure there is strong evidence against the defendant before indicting him, but also making sure that he receives a fair trial.’
    • ‘However, prosecutors did not indict him at that time on the grounds that the girl could not remember what he did.’
    • ‘All I can say from what I've seen, I would have to support the position that the government took on indicting him several years ago.’
    • ‘If you so testify in front of a jury, I will indict you for first degree murder.’
    • ‘And a grand jury or the state attorney makes the decision as to whether or not to formally indict you with the charges.’
    • ‘Undaunted, local prosecutors decided to indict him for possession of drug paraphernalia.’
    • ‘What legal grounds are there for indicting him for treason?’
    • ‘It's one of those things we're going to have to wait and see what the grand jury indicted him on.’
    • ‘He indicts her, raids her offices and it comes to nothing?’
    • ‘Despite considerable evidence, a grand jury refused to indict him.’
    charge with, accuse of, arraign for, take to court for, put on trial for, bring to trial for, prosecute for
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English endite, indite, from Anglo-Norman French enditer, based on Latin indicere ‘proclaim, appoint’, from in- ‘towards’ + dicere ‘pronounce, utter’.

Pronunciation

indict

/ɪnˈdaɪt//inˈdīt/