Definition of inclination in English:

inclination

noun

  • 1A person's natural tendency or urge to act or feel in a particular way; a disposition or propensity.

    ‘John was a scientist by training and inclination’
    ‘he was free to follow his inclinations’
    • ‘They are people with special tastes, inclinations and resources.’
    • ‘The problem is that my inclinations are in the opposite direction.’
    • ‘Previous conflicts between their natural inclinations and their fears would be resolved firmly in favour of the left.’
    • ‘But they are all still Leftists with the same dictatorial inclinations.’
    • ‘From foxhounds to sheep dogs, none can be successful in their natural inclinations without proper training.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, this education breeds and dignifies some dangerous inclinations.’
    • ‘The powers remain, but they now follow the inclinations of man's perverted and self-centred heart.’
    • ‘Many of us can think of a dream job… that perfect position matching our aptitudes and our inclinations.’
    • ‘The way of avoiding such tragedies is for everyone to follow his own inclinations, more or less as they arise.’
    • ‘The outcome is clearly a compromise of his own egalitarian inclinations.’
    • ‘They have different approaches, origins, orientations and inclinations.’
    • ‘Introspection and a compulsion to fleet-footed unexpectedness mean that I sometimes cannot trust my inclinations.’
    • ‘Are you ready to finally have your most deafening inclinations and desires voiced for you?’
    • ‘The problem is that many of us are out of touch with our natural inclinations.’
    • ‘Freedom for him is something that belongs to a person when he is not hindered from following his preferences and inclinations.’
    • ‘Being ruled by Venus, planet of love and beauty, you've always had the inclinations of a new romantic, even when grunge dominated.’
    • ‘All of my natural inclinations registered heavily on the Watchtower sin-o-meter.’
    • ‘The other items in each particular circumstance might be different mental events, including desires, inclinations, and so on.’
    • ‘Every living being is under the plan of his natural inclinations in terms of the modes of material nature.’
    • ‘In that context the audience would include beings of varying capacities, dispositions, and inclinations.’
    tendency, propensity, proclivity, leaning
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    1. 1.1inclination for/to/toward An interest in or liking for (something)
      ‘Burger King and Wendy's didn't show any inclination to jump into a price war with McDonald's’
      • ‘An inclination toward classical art and, most likely, the residual Protestantism of her Canadian-Scottish heritage were also evident.’
      • ‘Much of this, I gladly confide, derives from my lifelong inclination for historical geography.’
      • ‘Her first inclination was to decline, but before she knew what she was doing she decided that she would accept.’
      • ‘One of his more obvious characteristics is his inclination towards exaggeration.’
      • ‘And the image of ordinary, decent boys who showed no inclinations towards extremism and violence began to crumble.’
      • ‘But an inclination for music was not his only love, he also had a passion for film.’
      • ‘Most people don't have the time or inclination to evaluate everything they are told.’
      • ‘Some have inclinations towards activism without ever having really been politicized.’
      • ‘What I certainly don't feel is guilty about the fact that I have no inclination to watch.’
      • ‘Either way, if I look at them at all, my inclination to read more than a few lines is heavily influenced by their grasp of, say, punctuation.’
      • ‘Through her I have satisfied many inclinations to revenge.’
      • ‘Still, he is a bit raw and immature, and he showed no inclination to complete college.’
      • ‘‘The refugees and asylum seekers are generally law-abiding and educated and have no inclination towards crime,’ he said.’
      • ‘The second inconsistency is found in Calvin's insistence that the fallen will retains neither power to choose between good and evil nor any inclination for goodness.’
      • ‘Muslim organisations who collect zakat have their own agenda and have no interest or inclination to take up the cause of these poor Muslims.’
      • ‘The various publics, having other interests or no inclination toward foreign matters short of war, tended toward apathy.’
      liking, penchant, partiality, preference, appetite, fancy, fondness, affection, love
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  • 2A slope or slant.

    ‘changes in inclination of the line on the graph’
    • ‘Vicinal faces are typically only hundredths of one degree in inclination from the main crystal face on which they form.’
    • ‘Slope inclination and aspect were recorded at several locations within each stand.’
    • ‘The great diversity of plants in the formation is due to local variation in soil conditions, topography, slope inclination and resultant microclimates.’
    • ‘An inclination of 0 degrees would mean the orbit is perfectly aligned with Earth's orbital plane.’
    • ‘The plot was located on a north-west facing slope with an inclination of about 20° and an elevation range of 130 m from the lowest to the highest point.’
    1. 2.1 The action of inclining the body or head.
      ‘the questioner's inclination of his head’
      • ‘That most people walk in an ungraceful, ungainly and awkward manner with a forward inclination of the body does not mean that it is the normal way of walking.’
      • ‘A slight inclination of Roxy's head indicated to Helen that she knew about her estrangement from Tim.’
      • ‘A slight inclination of Alvito's head was all the acknowledgement this pledge received.’
      bowing, bow, bending, nod, nodding, lowering, dip
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    2. 2.2 The dip of a magnetic needle.
      • ‘The higher coercivity component has a inclination that is steeper than expected and a NW declination.’
      • ‘The third possible explanation for the shallow inclination of the high temperature component of magnetization is that the dykes were rotated about horizontal axes after magnetization.’
      • ‘This component has both reversed and normal polarity, with an average declination of 320 and an inclination of -13 deg.’
  • 3The angle at which a straight line or plane is inclined to another.

    • ‘The first design trend we examine here is in the orientation of the pectoral fin base, defined externally as the angle of inclination of the insertion of the pectoral fin on the body.’
    • ‘For example, at each location on the globe, the geomagnetic field lines intersect the Earth's surface at a specific angle of inclination.’
    • ‘Previous workers have examined the functional significance of variation in the angle of inclination of the fin base relative to the longitudinal axis of the body.’
    • ‘Dichroic ratios R, order parameter S, and inclination angle between membrane plans and diglucosamine ring plane.’
    • ‘The transmembrane helix of subunit VIIc changes its angle of inclination midway through the helix.’
    • ‘We also recorded terrain inclination angle, observer distance, time of day, date and year.’
    • ‘For example, it is likely that the angle of inclination of the pectoral fin base constrains the range of directions in which force may be applied on the fluid during swimming.’
    gradient, incline, slope, pitch, ramp, bank, ascent, rise, acclivity, descent, declivity
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    1. 3.1Astronomy The angle between the orbital plane of a planet, comet, etc. and the ecliptic, or between the orbital plane of a satellite and the equatorial plane of its primary.
      • ‘First, the relative inclination of the two orbits means their paths do not intersect.’
      • ‘He's based this idea on a study of the angle, or inclination, of asteroid orbits.’
      • ‘From that ellipse one can, in principle, determine the inclination of the planet's orbital plane.’
      • ‘The orbit plane inclination is from 55 to 60 degrees, which gives good coverage of latitudes up to 75 degrees north.’
      • ‘Because of the Mercury's high orbital inclination, it can be seen crossing the disk of the sun only rarely.’
    2. 3.2Astronomy The angle between the axis of an astronomical object and a fixed reference angle.
      • ‘He also hypothesized that the Mid-Paleogene cooling resulted from a sudden shift in the angle of inclination of the Earth's axis of rotation.’
      • ‘‘Some scientists believe that the monarchs sense the inclination of the earth by the changing autumn light,’ he says.’
      • ‘The most plausible conclusion is that the inclination of Jupiter's axis is automatically changing, as we know the Earth's has often done.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin inclinatio(n-), from inclinare ‘bend towards’ (see incline).

Pronunciation

inclination

/ˌɪnkləˈneɪʃ(ə)n//ˌinkləˈnāSH(ə)n/