Definition of inchoative in English:

inchoative

adjective

Grammar
  • Denoting an aspect of a verb expressing the beginning of an action, typically one occurring of its own accord. In many English verbs, inchoative uses alternate systematically with causative uses.

    Compare with ergative
    • ‘However, there are some positively evaluated conditions in common inchoative collocations with go: go live, go platinum, go blonde.’
    • ‘A hundred and forty years later, the inchoative generalization of the verb has shown up in the New York Times.’

noun

  • An inchoative verb.

    • ‘For anticausativization, I review recent arguments suggesting that derived inchoatives have causative semantics as part of their lexical representation, consistent with the MH.’
    • ‘An important defining feature of perfectivizing prefixation in Russian is the use of po- to signal the relative change of state in inchoatives as well as the indefinite temporal delimitation of atelic activities.’
    • ‘It is argued however that the Hebrew inchoatives do not create any problems to the LMH.’
    • ‘The fact that some idioms are restricted to causatives, while others are restricted to inchoatives, lends new support to the view that the two derivations are distinct.’
    • ‘Is he saying that our genes have been programmed by evolution to resist inchoatives that involve becoming lost?’

Pronunciation:

inchoative

/inˈkōədiv/