Definition of inceptive in English:

inceptive

adjective

  • 1Relating to or marking the beginning of something; initial.

    • ‘After quick cooling down, the inceptive sunshade curtain is set to a curled finished sunshade curtain.’
    • ‘Up to now, the inceptive style of Chicano performance art has typically been identified with Luis Valdez's Teatro Campesino.’
    • ‘And of course the most outstanding example of an inceptive cyborg where mind and matter are linked into one functional device is a living biological system.’
    • ‘Skinner's Original Pirate Material isn't inceptive but inventive, and he's asking for the same from more of his contemporaries.’
    • ‘And this is also true of the person who relies for his inceptive right upon a filing.’
    beginning, opening, commencing, starting, inceptive, embryonic, fledgling
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Grammar
      (of a verb) expressing the beginning of an action; inchoative.
      • ‘This same phrase is repeated later in but with an inceptive prefix emphasizing the inchoative sense.’
      • ‘In colloquial use, this affix may be appended to the inceptive copulas and to verbs as well, though this is considered uneducated.’
      • ‘Many of the most frequently used verbs in English are merely inceptive variants of other common verbs.’

noun

Grammar
  • An inceptive verb.

    • ‘The logical subject was marked nominative with intransitives, inceptives and verbs of motion.’
    • ‘These verbs are in the literature referred to as ‘inceptives’.’

Origin

Early 17th century (as a noun): from late Latin inceptivus, from incept- begun from the verb incipere.

Pronunciation:

inceptive

/inˈseptiv/