Definition of incensed in English:

incensed

adjective

  • Very angry; enraged.

    ‘I was absolutely incensed’
    • ‘Incensed with her forever indulging sister, Maggie zealously knocked on room 305, hoping Olivia would open the door.’
    • ‘Behind me there were about a dozen more cars incensed by my fast food version of civil disobedience.’
    • ‘Fraud investigators get incensed with how Hollywood portrays these people.’
    • ‘In May, market traders were incensed to be accused of selling shoddy goods.’
    • ‘Yet Cadette was even more incensed by the hypocritical reaction of the authorities.’
    • ‘Melinda, incensed, leaves a message on his phone.’
    • ‘Biographies have wafted incense around him, or been incensed by him.’
    • ‘The French were incensed, for Britain had no direct interest: Napoleon had taken nothing from her.’
    • ‘Producers are also incensed that much of the pigmeat being imported is not labelled with the country of origin.’
    • ‘The following morning, the incensed rival retaliated.’
    • ‘Ligeti went to see the film in 1968 and was rightly incensed.’
    • ‘Now, John was quite incensed about why rice has gone up.’
    • ‘I was incensed that my friend, an astute judge of character, had said yes.’
    • ‘Apparently, Wilbur was incensed at her bad manners.’
    • ‘Chairman of the Kyletalisha monitoring committee Cllr Marty Phelan was incensed.’
    • ‘Palestinian human rights campaigners were incensed by the finding.’
    • ‘Elizabeth cried, incensed at what had been said.’
    • ‘He knew immediately what he had done, and tried to apologise to an incensed crowd.’
    • ‘Shippey believes that literary critics should have been neither surprised nor incensed.’
    • ‘Gerstner, a temperamental type, was incensed.’

Pronunciation

incensed

/ɪnˈsɛnst//inˈsenst/