Main definitions of incense in English

: incense1incense2

incense1

noun

  • 1A gum, spice, or other substance that is burned for the sweet smell it produces.

    • ‘I lit some incense and laid down flowers and choked my way through the Scriptures.’
    • ‘The entire congregation later filed past the head of the coffin each member making a sign of the cross with a strange implement whilst on the coffin a small salver of incense smoked away.’
    • ‘I've also dedicated recent writing to her and burned incense to her almost daily.’
    • ‘He could see the cloth wrapped crystal next to the burned out incense stick.’
    • ‘They lit candles, chanted oaths, and burned incense.’
    • ‘When the time comes, settle yourself in front of the area, light the candle, and open the bottle of perfume or light the incense.’
    • ‘Instead, they burn incense and other sweet odors and light candles.’
    • ‘In the morning sunshine, local villagers climbed up to the mountain, burnt incense and prayed.’
    • ‘I turned on the CD player and watched as Amanda lit the incense.’
    • ‘Thinking of people close to me, lit a candle and burnt incense in memory of them.’
    • ‘Impressionist paintings hung on the walls and sandalwood incense released a sweet scent.’
    • ‘The people also held various kinds of burial rituals and burnt incense on special days.’
    • ‘There will be a statue of Buddha, candles, and an incense burner.’
    • ‘Set the incense cone directly atop the lighting point on the trail.’
    • ‘Myrrh is a fragrant gum resin used in making incense, perfume, and herbal medicine, and in ancient times it was also employed in embalming.’
    • ‘You could burn incense sticks or light a scented candle.’
    • ‘She always had some sandalwood incense burning when she sang, or wrote.’
    • ‘He then lit the incense and let the smoke rise for a few moments before taking it and walking around the room muttering the same words he had spoken before.’
    • ‘We would then all bow before the shrine, and my father would place incense on the altar.’
    • ‘We step inside and the smell of burning incense hits me like a lightning bolt.’
    perfume, fragrance, scent
    aroma, bouquet, redolence, balm
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The smoke or perfume of incense.
      • ‘All you see is the mist of thick and perfumed incense.’
      • ‘And his hair still smelled like incense and spices.’
      • ‘The pungent aroma of incense filled the corridor as the door opened wider.’
      • ‘The room was filed with stale smoke and faint incense, mixed with a strong odor of wine and ale.’
      • ‘But it returns to a recent past, in a softly lit yoga hall decorated in muted earthly tones and perfumed with incense.’
      • ‘The air eddies with charcoal smoke and incense.’
      • ‘The room was lit almost completely by soft candlelight, and the air was perfumed by sweet-smelling incense, and men smoking pipes filled with herbal concoctions.’
      • ‘Orthodox priests held a memorial service, and the blue smoke of incense smoke curled in the hot summer air.’
      • ‘Priests chanted prayers and read from sacred texts as incense wafted from the corners of the temple.’
      • ‘The reception area smells of incense and curry.’
      • ‘Automatically, his senses registered the smell of incense wafting through the air.’
      • ‘I never imagined I would be laying here, with the scent of incense and jasmine filling my nose, lying this close to anyone, nearly drowning in them.’
      • ‘The air in the church had been redolent with incense, thick and sweet-smelling.’
      • ‘The sweet smell of incense filled Hitomi's nose, making her feel slightly light-headed.’
      • ‘Luxurious silks drape the walls, candles flicker and the smell of incense fills the air.’
      • ‘She took in one final breath of the scent of the jasmine incense, the scent of the Goddess, one Angharad had adopted for herself.’
      • ‘Perfumed with incense and sandalwood and synonymous with soap and silk, it is among the most beautiful cities in the country.’
      • ‘The sweet smell of incense wafted in the evening wind.’
      • ‘The great defender of traditional liturgy could also be its critic when he thought the fog of incense was merely hiding a vacancy at the altar.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Perfume with incense or a similar fragrance.

    ‘the aroma of cannabis incensed the air’

Origin

Middle English (originally as encense): from Old French encens (noun), encenser (verb), from ecclesiastical Latin incensum something burned, incense neuter past participle of incendere set fire to from in- in + the base of candere to glow.

Main definitions of incense in English

: incense1incense2

incense2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make (someone) very angry.

    ‘she was incensed by the accusations’
    • ‘Nothing incenses expatriates quite so much as the nation's Byzantine bureaucracy.’
    • ‘However local hoteliers reacted angrily to the publishing of results and are incensed at the secrecy surrounding the tests.’
    • ‘A local woman was incensed and began a local petition to campaign to make the council change its mind.’
    • ‘The fans were incensed as the Frenchman lay still before a stretcher appeared then quickly disappeared.’
    • ‘Local soccer lovers were incensed and felt cheated when Bucks announced the match would be played in Port Elizabeth.’
    • ‘The locals were incensed and came out of their homes to argue with the British soldiers.’
    • ‘The Australian public, never a public to embrace political correctness, was absolutely incensed.’
    • ‘The other night when I was talking to my mother she was incensed that I wouldn't get any credit for this writing.’
    • ‘I was absolutely incensed and outraged at their stupid bureaucracy and lack of compassion.’
    • ‘That's the real reason I'm so incensed about this ban on the growing and consumption of cannabis.’
    • ‘The other unions are understood to be equally incensed.’
    • ‘He emailed the photos to some global chiropractic website, garnishing international accolades for himself while incensing his wife.’
    • ‘At least one artist was incensed by the curatorial insistence on deferring to local sensitivities.’
    • ‘Locals from Mountmellick are incensed by the amount of household rubbish that is being illegally dumped in areas of the town.’
    • ‘Nothing incenses me more than hearing that they are making money out of my misery.’
    • ‘Both times Sweden players, angered by the cheating and incensed by the lack of punishment, shouted at officials.’
    • ‘The industry has been incensed by suggestions that they are benefiting from the crisis.’
    • ‘The head of the committee in charge of overseeing the site has since walked out and accusations have been flying over exactly who is to blame for the delays that are increasingly incensing New Yorkers.’
    • ‘Residents were incensed that police had fired some 45 shots in their neighborhood in the attempt to capture Jones.’
    enrage, infuriate, anger, madden, send into a rage, outrage, inflame, exasperate, antagonize, provoke, irritate greatly, rile, gall
    make someone see red, make someone's blood boil, make someone's hackles rise, get someone's back up, hack off, drive crazy, drive mad, drive up the wall, get someone's dander up, get someone's goat, get up someone's nose, rattle someone's cage
    wind up, get on someone's wick, nark
    burn up, tick off, gravel
    enraged, very angry, irate, furious, infuriated, angered, in a temper, raging, incandescent, fuming, seething, beside oneself, outraged, in high dudgeon
    mad, hopping mad, wild, livid, as cross as two sticks, boiling, apoplectic, aerated, hot under the collar, on the warpath, up in arms, with all guns blazing, foaming at the mouth, steamed up, in a lather, in a paddy, in a filthy temper, fit to be tied
    shirty, stroppy
    sore, bent out of shape, soreheaded, ticked off
    ropeable, snaky, crook
    vex
    in a bate, waxy
    pissed off
    pissed
    wrathful, ireful, wroth
    piss off
    get on someone's tits
    empurple
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the general sense inflame or excite someone with a strong feeling): from Old French incenser, from Latin incendere set fire to.