Definition of in with a shout in US English:

in with a shout

phrase

informal
  • Having a good chance.

    ‘they were definitely in with a shout of bringing off a victory’
    • ‘Currie were still in with a shout but their best chance failed when Ramon took a marginally forward pass from Halbert before crossing the line.’
    • ‘Militis has a better chance in the 200m backstroke but both swimmers should be in with a shout of the finals, and from that point anything can happen.’
    • ‘And the fact they are now in with a shout of qualifying for a second successive European campaign is all the more remarkable given the strain placed on a relatively small squad.’
    • ‘It's more of a team thing and if we bowl out 13 sides like last season we will be in with a shout.’
    • ‘Pearce still thinks others have better credentials, but now that it is apparent that he really is in with a shout, he is not about to jeopardise his chances by ruling himself out.’
    • ‘Wigginton put together a 55-53 win at Tadcaster and 61-47 win at Tollerton to keep themselves in with a shout.’
    • ‘‘If you win your home games, you are in with a shout,’ says Ross.’
    • ‘We're in with a shout for three trophies and we'll be trying hard for all of them.’
    • ‘In the Fours, Michael Bruce, Graham Brooke, Eddie Howcroft and Phil Parsons were in with a shout at 7-5 down after eight ends.’
    • ‘I did think I was in with a shout as all three of my horses had chances.’