Definition of in (or out of) key in US English:

in (or out of) key

phrase

  • In (or out of) harmony.

    ‘this vaguely uplifting conclusion is out of key with the body of his book’
    • ‘The saxophonist plays one of his own improvisations, deliberately falling out of key, catching himself.’
    • ‘The highlight of my night occurred when three math majors sang ‘Like a Virgin’ horribly out of key.’
    • ‘Unless you've never stopped, you'll have to rediscover this voice to properly extend your range, stop straining your vocal chords and singing out of key.’
    • ‘Many felt even this would have been an over-development, out of key with other planning studies and proposals, which have proposed lower buildings.’
    • ‘Here, though, they're wavering, sliding in and out of key.’
    • ‘The secretary of the Bradford branch of the union said: ‘If you get this wrong a whole group of schools can be totally out of key.’’
    • ‘This would last until a major fight broke out over who had the best voice… or because one of us had said the other was out of key or whatever.’
    • ‘Every song is sure to be awesome and sung out of key.’
    • ‘I can express myself vocally and I can stay in key, but I don't think I have such an awesome voice.’
    • ‘I mean, people singing along to songs, even horribly out of key, is better than groups of people talking loudly in some sort of strange choir.’