Definition of in (or into) the open in US English:

in (or into) the open

phrase

  • 1Out of doors; not under cover.

    • ‘A clause in the new law states that dogs can be used to flush foxes hiding in woodlands out into the open.’
    • ‘People moved their beds outside into the open and slept under the sky during the hottest days.’
    • ‘But it did neither, and I resorted to an old technique to coax it into the open.’
    • ‘He pushed her forward, towards the camp and they walked back through the forest and out into the open.’
    • ‘Fighting to get out against the steady tide of workers still trying to fight their way back in, she pushed her way out into the open.’
    • ‘He was about to step out into the open when he thought of something and whirled back around.’
    • ‘So, this time, they would bring the fox out into the open where he could not trick them.’
    • ‘Animals like this only come into the open when the natural food supply is short.’
    • ‘I hold the bag close to my chest and run right out into the open, the men behind me, all male, screaming and waking the others up.’
    • ‘Locals say the only crowds were playing kids, who had been coaxed into the open by the soldiers' offers of chocolate.’
    1. 1.1 Not subject to concealment or obfuscation; made public.
      ‘we have never let our dislike for him come into the open’
      • ‘A challenger must come into the open and secure swift support across all wings of the party against the incumbent.’
      • ‘Alternatively, even nastier hidden stuff would be drawn out into the open.’
      • ‘All these rumours were starting and I think Andy just wanted to get it out into the open and thought it was the right time to do so.’
      • ‘We have to re - examine how we talk about sex and bring it into the open for rational, mature discussion.’
      • ‘He hated the idea of a clandestine affair and wanted to bring everything into the open.’
      • ‘It is very much in their interest to see that the affair does not come out into the open.’
      • ‘I think it did me some good to get some deeply buried thoughts and experiences out into the open.’
      • ‘It was only when I started asking questions that the whole thing came out into the open.’
      • ‘Differences between right and left are likely to spill into the open after the election.’
      • ‘For how else are society's dark secrets to be brought out into the open?’
      • ‘The effect of legal action is to drag the tobacco companies into the open, which is precisely where they don't want to be.’
      • ‘I think it is high time we had the debate and brought the issue into the open.’
      • ‘They need to get these issues into the open and expose Labour's weaknesses.’
      • ‘The tragedy is that innocent French civilians had to pay such a high price for bringing everything into the open.’
      • ‘I'd like to use the panel to help bring that conversation more out into the open.’
      • ‘Unless all of this is brought into the open, it is going to imperil the future.’
      • ‘The court was told that the sexual relationship came out into the open following a family argument.’
      • ‘If Britain is to be part of that process, the matter has to be brought out into the open and openly debated.’
      • ‘Perhaps it came more out into the open when I went to Glasgow High School.’
      • ‘The discontent that had been brewing within the Workers' Party soon came out into the open.’