Definition of improvise in English:

improvise

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Create and perform (music, drama, or verse) spontaneously or without preparation.

    ‘the ability to improvise operatic arias in any given style’
    [no object] ‘he was improvising to a backing of guitar chords’
    • ‘How much of the plot and the scenes were improvised by the ensemble?’
    • ‘Seemingly improvised banter is shared across a table as Jarmusch urges us to sit back and watch the magic unfold.’
    • ‘We continued to let the music swell and move, and began to improvise, creating our own music.’
    • ‘Poulenc composed essentially by improvising at the piano.’
    • ‘The dialogue was improvised entirely by the actors, and the cinematography is entirely static.’
    • ‘A very rough treatment was written, but most of the film was improvised on the spot.’
    • ‘Cassavetes also sometimes includes partially improvised scenes in the finished film.’
    • ‘The studios have pianists and sometimes drummers or other musicians who improvise as the dancers dance.’
    • ‘The teacher improvises at the piano during the games, but suggestions are given for compositions that could be played.’
    • ‘The dialogue was mostly improvised yet feels natural and unforced.’
    • ‘Clark says audiences are more open to improvised music than people think.’
    • ‘Oh well, perhaps some ballets possibly do look as though the dancers were gallantly improvising.’
    • ‘What are the pros and cons of having the cast improvising around the scripts?’
    • ‘He was encouraged to improvise around a script.’
    • ‘Working with these gags in mind, the performers still retain the freedom to completely improvise the dialogue.’
    • ‘In freely improvised music, its roots are in occasion rather than place.’
    • ‘Was there a script, or was the plot mostly improvised during shooting?’
    • ‘He improvised the music from the feelings he had and then he reintroduced the text.’
    • ‘Sometimes improvised music seems like a selfish display of skills.’
    • ‘At many of these events, advanced students spontaneously improvise solos or duets based on a theme given by audience members.’
    extemporize, ad lib, speak impromptu, make it up as one goes along, think on one's feet, take it as it comes
    impromptu, improvisational, improvisatory, unrehearsed, unprepared, unscripted, extempore, extemporized, spontaneous, unstudied, unpremeditated, unarranged, unplanned, on the spot, ad lib
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Produce or make (something) from whatever is available.
      ‘I improvised a costume for myself out of an old blue dress’
      • ‘In Kindamba he improvised a splint from palm branches and asked a carpenter to make another, around which tarpaulin would be wrapped.’
      • ‘At other locations protesters were seen digging up cobbles to throw at police and several tried to pull down fences to make improvised weapons.’
      • ‘Stopped by a police officer, Page had to improvise an accent.’
      • ‘If the ground is frozen solid, you improvise ways to drive a tent stake deep enough…’
      • ‘There will surely be more of these improvised intra-European coalitions of the willing.’
      • ‘And thus ends my hastily improvised day, which I couldn't have planned any better.’
      • ‘In most cases, soldiers improvised solutions to keep the offensive rolling.’
      • ‘The neighborhood carpenter would improvise a coffin with wood that sometimes came off of somebody's wall or chicken coup.’
      • ‘This was somewhat unexpected so I improvised a torch from my shirt and a tree branch.’
      • ‘They're living without power so they're lighting candles at night, they're smoking, some are improvising their cooking.’
      • ‘People improvised large-scale meals out of food that might otherwise have spoiled and fed entire streets.’
      • ‘The insurgents who were there have vanished, leaving improvised explosive devices buried everywhere.’
      • ‘To go with it, I decided to use up a couple of nectarines that were laying around, and I improvised a little tart.’
      • ‘Jack knows how to improvise solutions from the materials at hand, although he's a better engineer than he is a social psychologist.’
      • ‘A tiny girl outdid them all by improvising a skirt from her brawny boyfriend's wind-cheater, with the collar zipped smugly round her waist and the sleeves turned inwards, the cuffs dangling well below the hemline!’
      • ‘Their son, who is five, is able to improvise a whole range of superheroes from whatever is lying around the house.’
      • ‘So Bob improvised his meals based off whatever he could find being cooked on the line, or stored in the icebox.’
      • ‘Overtaken by the darkness, he had thrown his force into some of the houses and improvised a sort of fort.’
      • ‘On the streets youngsters improvise toys, carving tin cars from US AID containers, or play skittles with empty shells cases.’
      • ‘So many American troops and others have been killed by those improvised explosive devices.’
      makeshift, thrown together, cobbled together, devised, rigged, jury-rigged, rough and ready, make-do, emergency, stopgap, temporary, short-term, pro tem
      contrive, devise, throw together, cobble together, concoct, rig, jury-rig, put together
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century (earlier ( late 18th century) as improvisation): from French improviser or its source, Italian improvvisare, from improvviso extempore from Latin improvisus unforeseen based on provisus, past participle of providere make preparation for.

Pronunciation:

improvise

/ˈimprəˌvīz/