Definition of implore in English:

implore

verb

  • 1reporting verb Beg someone earnestly or desperately to do something.

    with object and infinitive ‘he implored her to change her mind’
    with direct speech ‘“Please don't talk that way,” Ellen implored’
    • ‘Most Arabic music is pure melody and rhythm, unencumbered by harmony; voices implore and exult, while instruments share the inflections of song.’
    • ‘On research, Gates implored politicians to dedicate more funding to federal research programs and to make the research and development tax credit permanent, an idea supported by President Bush.’
    • ‘And if they will perish, let them perish with our arms around their knees, imploring them to stay.’
    • ‘This is me imploring the congregation of nurses at the first learning session to please, please, please put more people on treatment.’
    • ‘There and then, he cast himself on the mercy of God, imploring him to forgive his sins and accept his soul for Christ's sake.’
    • ‘Conservative MPs implored key figures in the sponsorship scandal to ‘just let it out’ Wednesday and admit they lied to Parliament three years ago about their roles in the affair.’
    • ‘The Prime Minister has implored the state and territory leaders to take up the Commonwealth's plan for the Murray-Darling Basin for the good of the nation.’
    • ‘Thus this work can be read as autobiographical, sometimes more specifically as representing a triangle in which the man is Rodin, the imploring young woman, Camille, and the old woman, Rose Beuret, or more generally as a symbolic representation of the painful break between Claudel and Rodin.’
    • ‘What if they just forget the due process, consultants and planning stuff and like Mayo just ‘implored’ you to do it?’
    plead with, beg, entreat, beseech, appeal to, pray, ask, request, solicit, supplicate, importune, call on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic with object Beg earnestly for.
      ‘I implore mercy’
      • ‘It is to make atonement to the Most Scared Heart for all the sins of the world and to implore His grace and mercy for every family in the Ferrybank Parish.’
      • ‘Hundreds of young survivors of the blaze, sweaty and black with soot, raised their arms to the sky as if imploring mercy or hugged each other - sharing pain, fear, anguish and a feeling of helplessness.’
      • ‘The people prayed, wept, gnashed their teeth, pulled their hair, imploring the mercy of the Virgin Mary.’
      • ‘In her association with the apostles and several women, ‘we also see Mary by her prayers imploring the gift of the Spirit, who had already overshadowed her in the Annunciation.’’
      • ‘We implore God's mercy for ourselves, the church, and the world, because in God's world there is peace for all.’

Origin

Early 16th century: from French implorer or Latin implorare ‘invoke with tears’.

Pronunciation

implore

/imˈplôr//ɪmˈplɔr/