Definition of implication in English:

implication

noun

  • 1The conclusion that can be drawn from something although it is not explicitly stated.

    ‘the implication is that no one person at the bank is responsible’
    • ‘There's no implication that ignorance disqualifies anyone from having an opinion.’
    • ‘Constable Murray's implication is clear, but how many more were shot?’
    • ‘While the incident occurred on a Boeing 737 in flight, there's no implication that safety was breached.’
    • ‘Someone certainly wanted that implication to be made.’
    • ‘Most people would instinctively say no, and his implication in his article is that this crazy.’
    • ‘Any implication that I am engaged in diversionary activity will be hotly denied.’
    • ‘The TV licensing adverts make the clear but unstated implication that anyone who does not have a licence is breaking the law.’
    • ‘The other clear implication is that the military news coming out of the region is full of falsehoods.’
    • ‘He said they acted voluntarily, adding that there was no implication of fraud.’
    • ‘Adding that 'it has been getting better as we've gone along' takes us beyond implication into an outright lie.’
    • ‘But the water industry said the product's implication was that tap is impure, which was not the case.’
    • ‘Again, there was no grandstanding, no implication that the nation needed to have its resolve stiffened or its sinews strengthened.’
    • ‘I don't disagree that economists said this, but his implication is that they were wrong.’
    • ‘The most troubling implication of this story is that it appears to be untypical.’
    • ‘There was some implication that he did go in and out, possibly on assumed names and false passports.’
    • ‘I apologize for any contrary implication, and I hereby make a complete retraction.’
    • ‘Yes, I am sorry, I did not want to make that implication.’
    • ‘It is not a very healthy implication for a partnership, and no wonder things go wrong afterwards.’
    • ‘The subtlety of the humour is lost on the viewer if he is not aware of this implication.’
    • ‘The statement and its rather odd implication were reported around the world.’
    suggestion, inference, insinuation, innuendo, hint, intimation, imputation, indication
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    1. 1.1 A likely consequence of something.
      ‘a victory that had important political implications’
      • ‘Much more work is needed to explore the implications of the new findings for human health and disease.’
      • ‘Both articles carried broad political implications, given the subjects' high-level government ties.’
      • ‘Similarly, any requirement for regular external peer review would have serious practical implications.’
      • ‘Forget for a moment the political or even economic implications of the shifts in population.’
      • ‘Well, he might get away with it as long as people don't understand the security implications for Australia.’
      • ‘Although these assertions have long been recognized as problematic, their broad implications have not been fully examined.’
      • ‘The film is ambitious, with far-reaching political implications.’
      • ‘Are you interested in the political implications of weblogs and social software?’
      • ‘The implications of the results for comparative trait mapping in junction regions are discussed.’
      • ‘Finally, we discuss the practical implications of our findings for Cerulean Warbler conservation.’
      • ‘Hence, it is essential that they understand the serious physical implications caused by their addiction.’
      • ‘To leave that as an observation without examining its far-reaching implications seems remiss amidst any sociological exploration.’
      • ‘Privatization, in both developed and developing countries, is producing mixed results whose long-term implications are not yet clear.’
      • ‘Failure to understand the role of money can have profound political implications.’
      • ‘If this decline is not now arrested, it will have enormous negative implications for our economy and society.’
      • ‘Finally, suggestions for future research and clinical implications are discussed.’
      • ‘While the answer to this clinical question has profound ethical implications, the disagreement remains on clinical and technical grounds.’
      • ‘In 1995 the UK Department of Health considered the health implications of alcohol consumption.’
      • ‘The serious public health implication is that impaired crews may be unable to operate trains safely.’
      • ‘His insightful analysis will help military officers fully understand the moral implications of their actions.’
      consequence, result, ramification, repercussion, reverberation, effect
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  • 2The action or state of being involved in something.

    ‘our implication in the problems’
    • ‘What's underlying this essay, instead, is Chuck's own implication in the whole scheme.’
    incrimination, involvement, connection, entanglement, association
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Phrases

  • by implication

    • By what is implied or suggested rather than by formal expression.

      ‘he criticized her and, by implication, her country’
      • ‘No other license is granted to the buyer whether expressly, by implication, by estoppel or otherwise.’
      obliquely, by implication, by hinting, allusively
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘entwining, being entwined’): from Latin implicatio(n-), from the verb implicare (see implicate).

Pronunciation

implication

/ˌɪmpləˈkeɪʃ(ə)n//ˌimpləˈkāSH(ə)n/