Definition of imbue in US English:

imbue

verbimbued, imbues, imbuing

[with object]often be imbued with
  • Inspire or permeate with (a feeling or quality)

    ‘the entire performance was imbued with sparkle and elan’
    • ‘They are qualities the current squad is imbued with, given their performances under pressure.’
    • ‘A lady of gentle disposition and kind manner, Nora was imbued with a caring and compassionate nature.’
    • ‘He is imbued with a quiet confidence, but he appreciates how precious that particular commodity is.’
    • ‘We imbue the appreciation of art with some sort of Protestant work ethic and demand it does us good.’
    • ‘James was imbued with many noble qualities which served him well and earned him enormous respect.’
    • ‘I spend a lot of time praying that they are imbued with greater wisdom.’
    • ‘The rest of the squad are amateurs imbued with a professional attitude.’
    • ‘Scenes are imbued with a hallucinatory quality, reminiscent of European art cinema.’
    • ‘But his works are also imbued with social commentary, desperately wanting to make the world a better place.’
    • ‘Historical sites of revolutions are often imbued with an aura of romantic mystique.’
    • ‘He was a man of gentle and quiet disposition who was imbued with many noble qualities.’
    • ‘They played with control and flair in the first half, while the second half was imbued with indiscipline and scrappiness.’
    • ‘A gracious and pleasant lady, Delia was imbued with many fine and noble traits.’
    • ‘Most do an excellent job of capturing the classic feel of the characters, and imbuing an epic quality into proceedings.’
    • ‘Always eager to reach out to others, especially the Jews, he was imbued with a deep agony over the suffering of others.’
    • ‘Her books are also imbued with an ethos of tolerance and acceptance.’
    • ‘Her eccentric characters are imbued with humanity, and the ending is stunning.’
    • ‘People of Annie's generation were imbued with a great sense of country and patriotism.’
    • ‘Debt relief, too, is imbued with moral hazard: the worse a government behaves, the more it is rewarded.’
    • ‘It's an inspired album that is imbued with the warm spirit and gracious heart that is this family.’
    permeate, saturate, diffuse, suffuse, pervade
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘saturate’): from French imbu ‘moistened’, from Latin imbutus, past participle of imbuere ‘moisten’.

Pronunciation

imbue

/ɪmˈbju//imˈbyo͞o/