Definition of imagistic in US English:

imagistic

adjective

  • See imagism

    • ‘It subverts the rules of the rational world - the mainstream world - with its seemingly familiar form that is invaded by the irrational, the surreal, the magically real, the absurd, the imagistic, the truly symbolic.’
    • ‘Celia envisions her relationship with her granddaughter in similarly imagistic terms, which literalizes the cultural and psychic connection accomplished by dream work.’
    • ‘Without battling once more over the turf-claims for lyric or narrative, we can say lyric poetry is typically brief, its language is imagistic, its nature is deliberately symbolic, and its speaker is an individual.’
    • ‘There's an awful lot of content in New York poets - in a way they're very figurative and imagistic.’
    • ‘The first collection experiments with an imagistic style; as an English translation, however, it is awkward.’

Pronunciation

imagistic

/ˌiməˈjistik/