Definition of imagery in English:

imagery

noun

  • 1Visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work.

    ‘Tennyson uses imagery to create a lyrical emotion’
    • ‘Refinement of the language and surprising imagery are ways to evoke the inexpressible.’
    • ‘In addition to vivid imagery, another shared stylistic trait is that of pastiche.’
    • ‘It has been described as having a compelling narrative and vivid imagery, giving voice to alternative views.’
    • ‘Here then is nostalgia with a personal intensity within a poem that evokes language games and surreal imagery.’
    • ‘He excels at devising patterns of language and imagery, elaborating them down to minute detail, and sustaining them all through a play or a trilogy.’
    • ‘Golding frequently uses imagery to describe the scenery and the setting.’
    • ‘Often, he mixes abstract and figurative imagery, and over the years the mixture has changed.’
    • ‘These were the people who reached deep into the well of Biblical language and imagery to express their visions of the present and the future.’
    • ‘Lee also does a marvelous job of tracking the essay's central themes and its recurring patterns of imagery.’
    • ‘Rather, he appropriates the imagery of literary modernism to describe it.’
    • ‘Even during family moments, our language cheerfully embraces violent imagery.’
    • ‘The language, imagery and sentiments they all use are often identical.’
    • ‘But the notebooks are not simply a storehouse for banking imagery and language.’
    • ‘These circumstances shape the way they see London, what they write about and the language and imagery they use.’
    • ‘His resilient and defined imagery shows an unerring feeling for language.’
    • ‘I admired the energy of the prose, the juxtapositions, the surreal imagery, the insights.’
    • ‘For example, he uses a lot of imagery and describes the scenery in great detail.’
    • ‘To be fair, he employs biblical language and imagery at strategic points along the way.’
    • ‘From this pool of imagery, Borges created his favourite form of literature, the fantastic.’
    • ‘Written and spoken English, English literature, were shaped by the language and imagery of the King James Bible.’
    1. 1.1 Visual images collectively.
      ‘the impact of computer-generated imagery on contemporary art’
      • ‘It is a fact that the male brain is particularly responsive to and stimulated by visual imagery.’
      • ‘Either in digital or in picture form, the imagery is hard to interpret.’
      • ‘By the mid-sixteenth century the power of visual imagery to influence opinion and capture the imagination was already recognised.’
      • ‘To manipulate the imagery he uses rotoscope mattes to protect part of an image in order to replace it with another.’
      • ‘While the imagery was similar, the format and the images' density were not.’
      • ‘I respect her more for asking permission to use the imagery.’
      • ‘On your website, there is a lot beautiful imagery from photographs to original artwork.’
      • ‘Inspiration was drawn from the symbols and imagery of the two countries.’
      • ‘We react to visual imagery all of the time, whether we are conscious of it or not.’
      • ‘Use visual and mental imagery of yourself achieving and surpassing your goals.’
      image, imagery, figurative expression, metaphor, simile, trope, figure of speech
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Visual symbolism.
      ‘the film's religious imagery’
      • ‘He marries medium to subject with consummate skill, drawing on a lifetime's accumulation of thought and visual imagery.’
      • ‘Most imagery was religious; some of it was created to be didactic, some to exert spiritual power.’
      • ‘The film is rich in allegorical theme and symbolic imagery, transforming the most banal of materials into miraculous epiphanies.’
      • ‘The murals feature both secular and religious imagery and allude to issues such as slavery and notions of Utopia.’
      • ‘A seasoned director would have had a better handle on imagery, symbolism and pacing.’
      • ‘I could paint allegories, elegies and epic statements because the imagery was so strong and the colours of life were so rich.’
      • ‘It is the source of his imagery - from the religious iconography to the caravans of trucks to the dancers that populate his paintings.’
      • ‘It makes for a rich kind of film, full of imagery, allegory and variety.’
      • ‘Nautical imagery in contemporary art is often used to evoke forced migrations and political exile.’
      • ‘What makes it so phenomenally stunning, then, is the film's visual imagery.’
      • ‘An exercise in Renaissance perspective, the picture easily holds its own against the religious imagery surrounding it.’
      • ‘She draws links to legal culture, common visual imagery, and Franciscan spiritual currents.’
      • ‘Stylistically there's the same obsession with mirrors, and the typical eye-candy imagery.’
      • ‘The text, engaging and abstract, emphasizes the dreamlike quality of the imagery.’
      • ‘On the creative side, the use of flag imagery is identified in different designers' collections.’
      • ‘Performed on the climbing wall, the story is told using text, music, visual imagery and stunning choreography.’
      • ‘The haunting music score sits beautifully with the film's imagery.’
      • ‘The purpose of a film's score is often to complement the visual imagery and emotional delineation at play.’
      • ‘After the initial jolt from the imagery, his work holds up: he's a skillful painter.’
      • ‘As a feminist, mythographer, etc, does she find the visual imagery rather, well, Freudian?’
      • ‘In elite society, aristocratic funerary sculpture quickly replaced religious imagery with heraldic and symbolic devices.’

Origin

Middle English (in the senses statuary, carved images collectively): from Old French imagerie, from imager make an image from image (see image).

Pronunciation:

imagery

/ˈimij(ə)rē/