Definition of ill-disposed in English:

ill-disposed

adjective

  • Unfriendly or unsympathetic.

    ‘this fact was ignored by ill-disposed critics’
    • ‘He described Thomas Paine as a traitor to his country, a wicked, malicious, seditious and ill-disposed individual, who had actively supported both the American and the French Revolutions.’
    • ‘Surely this expresses, in part, Guest's anxiety about critics who were ill-disposed toward the beauty, elusive humor, and obliquity of her style.’
    • ‘She felt an uneasy qualm at the thought of her garden-proud neighbour, who was already ill-disposed towards the foxes, discovering caches of putrefying cheese among her spring flowers.’
    • ‘To tell the truth, I feel equally ill-disposed towards ‘American Beauty,’ which I haven't, and won't, see.’
    • ‘The anxieties of a society traditionally ill-disposed to taxation in general and new forms of taxation in particular made the task of the Treasury and the Committee of Ways and Means increasingly harrowing.’
    • ‘In addition to several reverses, there was the particularly worrying question of Japan, a country ill-disposed to the Allied powers.’
    • ‘Ideologues are quick to run to take up defensive positions against perceived ideological attacks by the other side, leaving them ill-disposed to think through rational analyses of the problems posed by aging populations.’
    • ‘They were all ill-disposed toward my argument.’
    • ‘This season he is part of a Celtic squad which is ill-disposed to losing, regardless of who they are playing and in which competition.’
    • ‘The latter three register as defensible, legitimate recordings, no matter how ill-disposed a given listener's attitude might be towards the genre.’
    • ‘This almost certainly has something to do with the national mood since September 11, which has been defensive for obvious reasons, and particularly ill-disposed to introspection and self-doubt.’
    • ‘British journalists seem particularly ill-disposed towards him.’
    • ‘But the officers remained angry, unsettled, and ill-disposed toward his message.’
    • ‘This alienated the democrats, who were ill-disposed to trust an army general anyway.’
    • ‘As the story progresses, his conspicuous use of foreign terms - agapemone, desiderata, virgo intacta, pace, esprit fort - makes us increasingly ill-disposed to tolerate his point of view.’
    • ‘His artistic vision is as brilliant, if not much deeper, than the layer where light bounces off the silver screen, and he is ill-disposed to let facts get in the way of what works dramatically.’
    • ‘Companies like Swedish SKF and Kodak, among others, will interpret such a step as an ill-disposed attitude towards foreign investors in general.’
    • ‘Brannon, a recent Columbia M.F.A. with a penchant for graphic design, may use paint, but one easily gets the sense that he is ill-disposed to brushwork.’
    • ‘People confident of their economic position would be ill-disposed towards changing the government.’
    hostile, antagonistic, unfriendly, unsympathetic, antipathetic, inimical, unfavourable
    opposing, opposed, averse, contrary, at odds
    anti, down on
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

ill-disposed

/ˈil dəˈˌspōzd/