Definition of hypocrisy in English:

hypocrisy

noun

  • The practice of claiming to have moral standards or beliefs to which one's own behavior does not conform; pretense.

    • ‘There's a lot of hypocrisy from the government about crime and what is happening in the inner cities.’
    • ‘The fact that she is an impostor makes an incredibly ironic point about hypocrisy.’
    • ‘Chao's hostility to politicians stems from what he considers their intrinsic hypocrisy.’
    • ‘Something must be done about this, if we are not to continue in our habitual posture of concerned hypocrisy.’
    • ‘At the same time, the artist alludes to the real world, having it out with hypocrisy and duplicity.’
    • ‘There's almost as much hypocrisy in the present government as there is in the church.’
    • ‘So, on top of everything else, there seems to be a case of political hypocrisy here.’
    • ‘The slaughter of men, women and children has been concealed by military and religious hypocrisy.’
    • ‘They will be exposed for things called hypocrisy and cant, and they will not get away with it.’
    • ‘The way society views the whole drug scene is riddled with hypocrisy and double standards.’
    • ‘However, as with the infant formula companies, the industry stands accused of hypocrisy.’
    • ‘Here is a fine example of journalistic hypocrisy, and you can never know that this is a sin I am guilty of.’
    • ‘There has certainly been too much misguided media management, some hypocrisy and even sleaze.’
    • ‘As for the authorities, surely there's a level of hypocrisy or humbug at the least.’
    • ‘Dislike of the clergy, accused of hypocrisy and worse, was of ancient origins.’
    • ‘There is an important point to be made about so-called sexual hypocrisy in government.’
    • ‘This book also does a tremendous job of exposing the corruption and hypocrisy of big business.’
    • ‘The common factor among the marchers was a rejection of cant, lies and hypocrisy.’
    • ‘I myself have had problems with American politics and hypocrisy since I was a small child.’
    • ‘The words we hear from our leaders are a daily diet of lies, spin and hypocrisy.’
    sanctimoniousness, sanctimony, pietism, piousness, affected piety, affected superiority, false virtue, cant, humbug, pretence, posturing, speciousness, empty talk
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French ypocrisie, via ecclesiastical Latin, from Greek hupokrisis ‘acting of a theatrical part’, from hupokrinesthai ‘play a part, pretend’, from hupo ‘under’ + krinein ‘decide, judge’.

Pronunciation

hypocrisy

/həˈpäkrəsē//həˈpɑkrəsi/