Definition of hymnody in English:

hymnody

noun

  • The singing or composition of hymns.

    • ‘Cyberspace will not eclipse the Eucharist or destroy Protestant hymnody, although it might frustrate a lot of liturgists and composers!’
    • ‘While some looked for a one-kind-fits-all solution, the actual hymnody reflected a more complicated situation.’
    • ‘Given that strict approach, then, ‘There is no way in the world to prove uninspired hymnody.’’
    • ‘There is very little that reflects the Christian hymnody of ‘field and forest, flowery meadow, flashing sea.’’
    • ‘We can also benefit from our African brothers and sisters when it comes to hymnody, song and melody.’
    • ‘Again, the miserable poverty of so much contemporary hymnody likewise undermines the most careful attention to liturgy.’
    • ‘Where should we stand with church architecture, hymnody, liturgical elements and the like?’
    • ‘So too, it is only sleeping children that we liken to angels-even though our hymnody reminds us that angels never sleep!’
    • ‘Second, the Moravians were the pioneers in what we would today know as evangelical hymnody.’
    • ‘Of the discursive chapters, Duck's review of Trinitarian language in English-language hymnody is probably the most illuminating.’
    • ‘There has been an explosion of creative new hymnody, reflected and made available in a host of new hymnals.’
    • ‘The late 1960s and early 70s were times of great experimentation and upheaval in hymnody.’
    • ‘The old traditions of lined-out hymnody, camp-meeting choruses, and shape-note tunes played signal roles in the conversion of slaves to Christianity.’
    • ‘Wither is considered a pioneer of English hymnody because of his Hymnes and Songs of the Church published in 1623.’
    • ‘In short, I prefer hymnody that directs our minds to God, not to contemplation of How Truly Wonderful We Are.’
    • ‘Protestant hymnody in particular has a special hold on him.’
    • ‘There was, of course, a vast amount of music in the U.S. in this period besides symphonic music, Lutheran hymnody, and Wagnerian opera.’
    • ‘Noteworthy also is the greater use of one another's legacy of hymnody.’
    • ‘She attends to the scriptural basis of prayer and hymnody, as well as reading and sermon.’
    • ‘This remarkable text by Fred Kaan is a great addition to Christmas hymnody.’

Origin

Early 18th century: via medieval Latin from Greek humnōidia, from humnos hymn.

Pronunciation:

hymnody

/ˈhimnədē/