Definition of hump in English:

hump

noun

  • 1A rounded protuberance found on the back of a camel or other animal or as an abnormality on a person's back.

    • ‘One of this animal's distinguishing features is the saddle-like hump on its back.’
    • ‘Instead of a dorsal fin they have a prominent dorsal hump about two-thirds of the way down their back.’
    • ‘An Asian camel with two humps can go only for a few days and would not last in Sinai conditions.’
    • ‘There is often a prominent hump in front of the dorsal fin.’
    • ‘Compared to the domestic Bactrian camel, the wild Bactrian is greyer, slimmer, and has smaller sized humps spaced more widely apart.’
    • ‘The other is a deformed little man with a big hump on his back and oily black hair.’
    • ‘The older members of the herd have full sets of antlers and prominent wooly humps, but they only walk.’
    • ‘Before beginning to walk, a baby with achondroplasia often develops a small hump on his upper back.’
    • ‘In Indian waters the marine mammals display spotted skin and grow smaller humps.’
    • ‘Aging camels may be slaughtered for their meat, especially when guests are expected for a celebration, and the fatty camel's hump is considered a delicacy.’
    • ‘Appropriately named, the humpback chub has a small head and snout, a streamlined gray body streaked with silver, and a prominent hump along its back.’
    • ‘The wild Bactrian camel has longer legs, lighter fur, and smaller humps than domesticated camels have.’
    • ‘He snorted indignantly, and walked away across the tram rails, his hump quivering with rage.’
    • ‘During such times they live mainly off the fat stored in their humps.’
    • ‘They have a slender body with a low dorsal hump and no dorsal fin.’
    • ‘The people of Arabia used to cut off the humps of camels or the fat part of the sheep while still alive.’
    • ‘His body was hunched over painfully, creating a hump at the back of his neck.’
    • ‘Now, instead of the point, there are two round humps separated by a trough, like a camel's hump.’
    • ‘He provides a sketch of a creature with the head of an elephant, a fishlike body with a camel hump, four legs like a lion, and a forked tail like a fish.’
    • ‘These adverse events include acne, easy bruising, moon face, swollen ankles, hirsutism, buffalo hump, and skin striae.’
    protuberance, lump, bump, knob, protrusion, prominence, projection, bulge, swelling, hunch, nodule, node, mass, growth, outgrowth, excrescence
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  • 2A rounded raised mass of earth or land.

    • ‘From here there's a breathtaking view of the whale-like humps of the hills beyond Troutbeck, on the other side of the lake.’
    • ‘The Similans are granite humps which rise from the clear, tropical sea.’
    • ‘Almost immediately, a sonar scan of the sea bed revealed a line of unnatural-looking humps, only 100 ft out from the shore - an obvious invitation to the divers.’
    • ‘Field surveys were conducted to measure the heights and widths of humps.’
    • ‘The smooth humps of downland suited his purpose.’
    • ‘There are multiple humps to get over, corners to putt round, small pipes to putt through and an impossible basket to putt into.’
    • ‘Gravel pathways winding over humps in the landscape, idyllic wooden bridges crossing twinkling streams here and there, all clothed in colourful vegetation.’
    • ‘But Mr Oswald said the breathtaking array of ditches, humps and bank was much more extensive than anyone had thought.’
    • ‘Thanks to a dry course, the ball landed on the downhill side of a grass hump and rolled 30 yards straight onto the green and into the cup.’
    • ‘If one were to travel past the countless monolithic factories and coal pits of the world's main continent, and onto where the equator was once, one would find a small hump of earth.’
    • ‘There are certainly plenty of humps and dips, including deep valleys that correspond to several mass extinctions.’
    • ‘After an overnight stay in the hut we made an early start by following a wildlife trail up a rocky hump on the east bank of the stream to the east of the hut.’
    • ‘There must be something worth looking at in this huge expanse of dry puna that stretched away from us to some distant humps.’
    • ‘The contouring of the fairways and greens is strong and the dramatic humps and hollows combined with the strategic design of the layout will present playing characteristics in a traditional links style.’
    1. 2.1 A mound over which railroad vehicles are pushed so as to run by gravity to the required place in a switchyard.
      • ‘Scheme 4 created a hump yard on the West Toronto side with the hump crest at Runnymede Road just as was the existing hump.’
      • ‘Six more tracks were also added to the classification yard, west of the hump.’
      • ‘Lastly, to accommodate the increasing postwar coal business, 26 more tracks were added to the classification yard west of the hump in 1949.’
      • ‘Older hump yards utilized large numbers of ‘riders’, yardmen who rode cars to apply hand brakes as they went down the hump.’
      • ‘A single-track hump can handle about 800 cars per shift.’

verb

  • 1British informal with object and adverbial of direction Lift or carry (a heavy object) with difficulty.

    ‘he continued to hump cases up and down the hotel corridor’
    • ‘At least I no longer have to hump the zinc bath in from the backyard.’
    • ‘Huge tunas were humped off to local restaurants.’
    • ‘You really can't hump 50 lb rucksacks with a back problem, can you?’
    • ‘Removals took one full day moving to and fro between the two houses with my two sons helping to hump the heavy stuff into and out of the van.’
    • ‘I saw one group of traders run off like a startled herd, humping their bags of bags, while three police, like a pack of hunting dogs, scragged the least nimble.’
    • ‘Rather than just shuffle the new bottles in and let me hump them into the house, she asked me where I wanted them.’
    • ‘Personally it worked OK for me but I am reasonably fit and can hump my luggage about without too much trouble.’
    • ‘And the vandal humping various bags of concrete and heavy tools around in the middle of the night may also have been deterred by the sight of a uniform or two.’
    • ‘And of course we never thought that some day we might have to hump the eighteen stone up Kilimanjaro.’
    • ‘Don't be alarmed by the fat content of such food - you'll need plenty of fat, protein and carbohydrate fuel to hump your enormous pack up Mount Fuji.’
    • ‘It's very nice not to have to meet train or bus time tables, to hump baggage, nor to contend with taxi drivers taking you on a tour when your destination is just around the corner.’
    • ‘You are going to hump it around airport terminals, on and off trains and buses.’
    • ‘I don't drive, so the only way to get two big bags of compost and some plants home is to borrow a trolley and hump it up the hill!’
    • ‘Everything had to be humped up and down countless stairs to get into the room - tables, chairs, the dozen or more boxes of crockery, all the catering equipment, and the well-stocked bar too.’
    • ‘We have set up tours, got work permits, worked out hotels and humped equipment for our artists.’
    • ‘Heritage volunteers - many of them no longer in the prime of youth - literally humped everything up two flights of stairs in a bucket chain.’
    • ‘I take my bag and hump it out of the front of the station where the smart double-decker coach is awaiting us.’
    carry, lug, heave, lift, shoulder, hoist, heft, tote
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    1. 1.1no object Move heavily and awkwardly.
      ‘it was late morning by the time I finally humped into camp’
  • 2with object Make hump-shaped.

    ‘the cat humped himself into a different shape and purred’
    • ‘Without further pause and again in silence, I hump my body up over the rock.’
    arch, curve, hunch, bend, bow, curl, crook
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  • 3vulgar slang with object Have sexual intercourse with.

Phrases

  • over the hump

    • Over the worst or most difficult part of something.

      • ‘But, you know, Christmas and the New Year aren't too far away and soon we'll all be over the hump.’
      • ‘That's what got us over the hump and gave us the advantage in the first half.’
      • ‘Local retailers will be looking to residents to help them over the hump so that everyone can be part of the bright new future this regeneration will bring.’
      • ‘‘They look like they're over the hump now,’ he says.’
      • ‘If we all kick in a few bucks we can help them get over the hump.’
      • ‘Then, in an instant, we are over the hump, the gray skies part, and we descend toward the lowlands.’
      • ‘Change is usually a big part of a team getting over the hump.’
      • ‘Something like this could really get us over the hump.’
      • ‘If we lose our energy, we don't have one player who can get us over the hump or even to the free throw line late in the game.’
      • ‘But when I'm over the hump, rest assured I will get back to you, even if you've totally forgotten that you emailed me.’
      over the worst part, over the worst of it, out of the woods, on the road to recovery, on the up and up, on the way up, getting better, making progress, in the clear
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Origin

Early 18th century: probably related to Low German humpe ‘hump’, also to Dutch homp, Low German humpe ‘lump, hunk (of bread)’.

Pronunciation

hump

/həmp//həmp/