Definition of humankind in US English:

humankind

noun

  • Human beings considered collectively (used as a neutral alternative to “mankind”)

    ‘the origin of humankind’
    • ‘That is not to say that with effort and discipline humankind cannot manage some amazing achievements of thought.’
    • ‘If this is true, it is a testament to the fact that advances in technology do not always represent progress for humankind.’
    • ‘That, alone, raises the most terrifying prospects for the future of humankind.’
    • ‘The blood and tears of this past week are a reminder, terror is as old as humankind.’
    • ‘Yet knowledgeable economists agree that these restrictions are bad for humankind.’
    • ‘It should have made us all proud to be of such brotherhood of humankind.’
    • ‘How can humankind's darkest hour be conveyed by a medium fundamentally committed to entertainment?’
    • ‘Today, humankind has the science and technology to destroy itself or to provide prosperity to all.’
    • ‘Neanderthal man bore enough similarities to modern man to have once been thought to be the species humankind evolved from.’
    • ‘Such pursuit is an inherent part of living in a fallen world that is subject to the sins of humankind.’
    • ‘Outer space is a common heritage of all humankind to be shared and appreciated with awe.’
    • ‘These finely-tuned killing machines have fascinated humankind for centuries.’
    • ‘Conscience and science must go hand in hand to prevent the destruction of humankind.’
    • ‘Obviously I'm a mild mannered man with an unending love for humankind, and I only ever see the best in people.’
    • ‘Some people have done so much for humankind that their names write history.’
    • ‘Though leavened with humour, the play is a dispassionate survey of humankind's folly.’
    • ‘The seabed is explicitly called the common heritage of humankind and cannot be claimed by any one country.’
    • ‘Trees with unsafe limbs can be pruned or pollarded at the correct time of year to extend their life and keep their benefit for humankind.’
    • ‘They are the enemies of democracy and the enemies of all humankind.’
    • ‘In its seeming ambiguity yet divine reality it remains free of the influence of humankind and our lusts.’
    the human race, the human species, humanity, mankind, man, people, mortals
    View synonyms

Usage

See man

Pronunciation

humankind

/ˌ(h)yo͞omənˈkīnd//ˌ(h)jumənˈkaɪnd/