Definition of hullabaloo in English:

hullabaloo

noun

informal
  • [in singular] A commotion; a fuss.

    ‘remember all the hullabaloo over the golf ball?’
    • ‘There is very little point in them creating a whole hullabaloo about it.’
    • ‘Somewhere in the hullabaloo, she got to thinking, ‘Why do we do this, anyway?’’
    • ‘Do you remember the big hullabaloo when Brian Moree tabled his report on immigration.’
    • ‘Much hullabaloo has been made of independent internet sites and bloggers scooping the mainstream media in breaking stories and battering it to death with fact checking.’
    • ‘The hullabaloo following this seemed to unsettled Laois who appeared to lose their concentration, and this very nearly proved to be their undoing.’
    • ‘When the hullabaloo was over, a leader revealed that it was just a casual chat on the political developments.’
    • ‘When a new car is launched - especially one as important to the North-East as this one - it is all too easy to become overwhelmed by the corporate hullabaloo.’
    • ‘So what's the entire hullabaloo about, many tend to ask.’
    • ‘Free trade does not lower wages or cause persistent unemployment There is nothing new in the current hullabaloo about free trade, jobs, and trade deficits.’
    • ‘Take the hullabaloo about the shooting party, reported to include the Duke of Edinburgh, which shot some pheasant on the Sandringham estate in view of some schoolchildren.’
    • ‘Another Los Angeles resident Joe Malkin said, ‘I couldn't understand what all the hullabaloo was about.’’
    • ‘During the hullabaloo of that time, public support for Delta Team quickly dissolved and its equipment and troops were scattered in the wind.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, the neighbours create a hullabaloo into the small hours, which has made getting to sleep very bothersome.’
    • ‘We instantly remembered the whole hullabaloo around the release of the alien autopsy tapes back in 1995 and the controversy it caused world-wide.’
    • ‘You can imagine the hullabaloo in the press, right?’
    • ‘But I'll tell you what, I don't get what all the hullabaloo is about with her.’
    • ‘Conservative columnists have had a field day pointing to the Harvard hullabaloo as a sign of runaway political correctness at elite universities.’
    • ‘I've enjoyed your coverage of the recent hullabaloo over the book on ecofascism that I co-authored and its misuse by Senator Brandis.’
    • ‘For example, remember the hullabaloo about the so-called ‘Mozart effect’ a few years ago.’
    • ‘But the festivities will be cut abruptly short by the anniversary, which Hoboken will mark in a manner far more sombre and sober than the hullabaloo over the river.’
    fuss, commotion, uproar, hubbub, outcry, furore, ruckus, ado, palaver, brouhaha, hue and cry
    pandemonium, mayhem, tumult, turmoil, hurly-burly
    roar, racket, din, noise, clamour, bedlam, babel
    rumpus, ruction, hoo-ha, to-do, song and dance
    kerfuffle, carry-on, row
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: reduplication of hallo, hullo, etc..

Pronunciation:

hullabaloo

/ˌhələbəˈlo͞o//ˈhələbəˌlo͞o/