Main definitions of hull in English

: hull1hull2Hull3

hull1

noun

  • The main body of a ship or other vessel, including the bottom, sides, and deck but not the masts, superstructure, rigging, engines, and other fittings.

    • ‘The main hulls and bridge deck are of steel construction.’
    • ‘The frigates have a double-skinned hull divided by ten bulkheads into watertight compartments.’
    • ‘One of these was an American coast guard vessel, a huge white sailing ship with modern metal hull, coast guard swaths of red on her sides.’
    • ‘Under the stern, the rudders and propellers keep the hull clear of the bottom.’
    • ‘The main structural bulkhead supports the hull sides at the chain plates and the cabin top at the mast step is drastically cut away so the interior is more open.’
    • ‘Turning forward along the starboard side, the hull soon comes to a clean break across a bulkhead.’
    • ‘The design and engineering of the hulls, decks, interior furnishing and machinery are carefully evaluated to ensure overall quality.’
    • ‘Restoration of the paddle steamer will involve stripping the entire front third of the vessel before repairing the hull and refurbishing the engines.’
    • ‘On the main deck, the hull is arranged with forepeak, hydraulic pump room, accommodation section and fish handling area.’
    • ‘When crossing the Atlantic, he charted the location of the Gulf Stream and designed new hulls, riggings, propellers, and pumps for sailing vessels.’
    • ‘The hull sides and decks utilize a balsa wood core between fiberglass laminates for weight reduction and stiffness.’
    • ‘Most noticeable are the changes in the shape of the hull, upper deck and radar masts which will all help to prevent the vessels being picked up by radar.’
    • ‘Then a thick, terrific blast pierced through the shield and glanced off the ship, blistering the hull and raking a starboard section open.’
    • ‘The main hull of the medieval ship at Newport in South Wales was raised last autumn, leaving whatever survives of the missing bow and stern to be recovered at a later stage of construction.’
    • ‘The small, dark squares visible along the hull beneath the main deck represent windows that illuminated interior spaces.’
    • ‘During that war gunners would skip cannon balls off the water in an attempt to breach the hull of an enemy ship close to the waterline.’
    • ‘Right at the front of the bow one can look back along both the upper port and lower starboard sides of the hull.’
    • ‘Plating from the sides of the hull and deck has rotted away to leave a skeleton of ribs.’
    • ‘A fouled hull can reduce a ship's speed by 5 percent and increase fuel consumption by 40 percent.’
    • ‘The after sections are nearly flat with a radius of about 18 inches where the hull sides and bottom meet.’
    framework, body, frame, skeleton, shell, structure, basic structure
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually be hulled
  • Hit and pierce the hull of (a ship) with a shell or other missile.

    • ‘We believed it has been hulled, it has a hole the size of a fist and some cracking in the hull of the ship.’
    • ‘The ventral shields of the Omega saved him from hulling the fighter on the unforgiving rock.’
    • ‘Our ship of state's hulled, our economy's sinking.’

Origin

Middle English: perhaps the same word as hull, or related to hold.

Pronunciation

hull

/həl//həl/

Main definitions of hull in English

: hull1hull2Hull3

hull2

noun

  • 1The outer covering of a fruit or seed, especially the pod of peas and beans, or the husk of grain.

    • ‘An abundant 24 kDa protein has been purified and identified from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr) seed hulls.’
    • ‘The conclusions of Moore and Hatfield are based on data from forages rather than from grain hulls.’
    • ‘Dry soybeans are prone to have cracked seed hulls, which reduces germination.’
    • ‘Without the gravity well for acceleration, the damage would be absorbed by the outer hulls.’
    • ‘Fill with hulled sunflowers seeds to avoid the mess of seed hulls.’
    • ‘Lay a tarp under the feeder to catch seed hulls and dropped seed.’
    • ‘Another source shows that both the outer hulls and inner skins are tinged various shades of pink and purple.’
    • ‘She carried this one even further and tried, where possible, to use agro-based materials made from crop residues such as wheat straws and sunflower seed hulls.’
    • ‘Total RNA was extracted from leaves, tillers, young panicles, leaf sheaths, hulls, and anthers of rice using the hot phenol method as previously described.’
    • ‘He created a re-circulating system to clean the grain and sold the hulls as bedding and a low-potassium roughage source.’
    • ‘Sunflower seed hulls, roasted and ground, were used by Native Americans and pioneers as a coffee substitute.’
    • ‘Apply a 2-to 3-inch layer of mulch, such as pine needles, shredded bark, or seed hulls, after the plants resume active growth.’
    • ‘Four grams of embryos (achenes without hull and seed coat) were homogenized and oil was extracted in boiling petroleum ether.’
    • ‘Dietary fiber is the complex carbohydrate found in grain, hulls, and plant forage material and is not efficiently digested by swine.’
    • ‘The fibrous seed coat or hull of most commercial barley varieties is cemented to the caryopsis and is not removed during threshing.’
    • ‘It also has a sharp edge so the user may cut the grain hulls from the cob.’
    • ‘The product used as filling for these pillows of buckwheat is actually the hulls or husks that protect the kernels.’
    • ‘The machine grinds off the coffee beans' outer hull, and separates the miel into a giant basin.’
    • ‘Then we searched the enclosure with a Geiger counter to locate scatter-hoarded seeds and hulls of eaten seeds.’
    • ‘Early tests show these pellets to be more digestible than those already made from cotton seed hulls.’
    shell, husk, pod, case, casing, covering, seed case
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The green calyx of a strawberry or raspberry.
      • ‘Rinse the berries and tip them into a dish, removing the strawberry hulls and currant stalks as you go.’
      • ‘Wash the strawberries, pat them dry and remove their hulls.’
      • ‘Wash the strawberries remove the stalks and hull, then cut them into pieces and place in bowls.’
      • ‘But for some reason, organic strawberries seem to have stronger hulls than regular pesticide-covered ones, and now my only question is: whither a strawberry huller?’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as adjective hulled
  • Remove the hulls from (fruit, seeds, or grain).

    • ‘After the seeds are dried and hulled, they become green coffee beans.’
    • ‘Each family compound contained a large wooden mortar and pestle used to process corn into meal or grits after it had been hulled by cooking with lye or mixing with ashes.’
    • ‘Clean and hull strawberries; place in food processor or blender just until puréed.’
    • ‘He had to hull the rice since there would be no way to hide the fact if he merely loafed around.’
    • ‘Finally, the rice is dry-roasted, cleaned, hulled, and sorted according to its intended use, in rice blends or even products like wild rice tortilla chips.’
    • ‘Mill managements claim the wage cut is necessary because of low prices offered by the Food Corporation of India for hulling the rice (removing the outer husk).’
    • ‘Which is why, in an effort to catch up with the New Domesticity or at least try it on for size, I'm hulling strawberries in a demonstration kitchen on Oxford Street.’
    • ‘However, in our experiment, pigs fed the hulled barley, low-fat diet did not exhibit poorer growth performance than pigs fed other diets.’
    • ‘They may be white, yellow, brown, or black, according to variety, with a white inside which is revealed when they are hulled.’
    • ‘Callao barley was released by the Virginia Crop Improvement Association in 1994 as a high-yielding, high-test weight hulled barley for eastern seaboard growing conditions.’
    • ‘Keep any washing to just a quick rinse, as strawberries don't like water - and always before hulling, not after.’
    • ‘They are hulled, shelled, graded and inspected.’
    • ‘The end of a vegetable peeler, a sharp knife or the tip of a spoon do a great job of hulling the berries.’
    • ‘The microscopic injuries thwart development of surrounding tissue and appear as big brown spots after the seed matures and is marketed and hulled.’
    • ‘For comparison purposes, diets based primarily on corn, hulled barley, and wheat were also assessed.’
    • ‘They have more starch and protein but less fiber than hulled varieties.’
    • ‘They know what they like and it's not cracked corn, nor is it wheat, milo, peanut hearts, hulled oats, or rice.’
    • ‘Head of catering Jane Theyers said the event needed at least 56 people to cover the two days in jobs ranging from serving and washing up to hulling the strawberries.’
    • ‘His will be Queensland's southernmost coffee crop, and already he has the coffee houses calling to ask when the first boutique beans will be hulled and ready.’
    shell, husk, peel, pare, skin
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English hulu, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch huls, German Hülse ‘husk, pod’, and German Hülle ‘covering’, also to heel.

Pronunciation

hull

/həl//həl/

Main definitions of hull in English

: hull1hull2Hull3

Hull3

proper noun

  • A city and port in northeastern England, situated at the junction of the Hull and Humber Rivers; population 263,000 (est. 2009).

    Official name Kingston upon Hull

Pronunciation

Hull

/həl/