Definition of Huguenot in US English:

Huguenot

noun

  • A French Protestant of the 16th–17th centuries. Largely Calvinist, the Huguenots suffered severe persecution at the hands of the Catholic majority, and many thousands emigrated from France.

    • ‘Althusius was strongly influenced by French Huguenots and Calvinism.’
    • ‘The Huguenots were French Protestants who had been persecuted for their faith.’
    • ‘During Richelieu's campaign against the Huguenots, France had to borrow boats to transport their troops and supplies.’
    • ‘Early beneficiaries were the French Huguenots who came there after Louis XIV's outlawing of Protestantism in 1685.’
    • ‘To start with Louis embarked on a policy to bring the Huguenots back to the Catholic Church.’
    • ‘The first Huguenot ministers arrived in France in 1553.’
    • ‘By 1561 there were 2000 Calvinist churches in France and the Huguenots had become a political faction that seemed to threaten the state.’
    • ‘They welcomed Jews and Huguenots in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.’
    • ‘During the 1750s French Huguenots suffered the last great wave of state-sponsored persecution, and Jansenists within the Gallican Church fared little better.’
    • ‘In the end there were over two million members of the Huguenot churches in France.’

Origin

French, alteration (by association with the name of a Geneva burgomaster, Besançon Hugues) of eiguenot, from Dutch eedgenot, from Swiss German Eidgenoss ‘confederate’, from Eid ‘oath’ + Genoss ‘associate’.

Pronunciation

Huguenot

/ˈhyo͞oɡəˌnät//ˈhjuɡəˌnɑt/