Definition of hound in English:

hound

noun

  • 1A dog of a breed used for hunting, especially one able to track by scent.

    • ‘The Dachshund was bred as a badger hound or hunting dog and is known to have existed from the oldest breeds of German hunting dogs such as the Bibarhund.’
    • ‘He was judged against a flat-coated retriever, a giant schnauzer, an Old English sheepdog, a wire fox terrier, a saluki hound and Pekingese toy dog.’
    • ‘Leontius bred hounds of great size and ferocity.’
    • ‘The dog hound, bred by Jimmy Glaister out of West Vale Haze by Pinfold Rock, put in some good performances only to beaten on the run to the line.’
    • ‘After 1pm a range of events will take place at the Langton Wold Gallops including a parade of hunting hounds, a celebrity pony Grand National and dressage display.’
    • ‘The final cluster includes scent hounds, terriers, spaniels, and retrievers.’
    • ‘Billy's dogs become known as the best hunting hounds in the Ozarks.’
    • ‘Topics under discussion ranged from hunting hounds on the track, through to the future of the East Coast Main Line and problems at Leeds Station.’
    • ‘It will strike many as absurd that the Government is this week holding an unprecedented three-day hearing at Westminster into whether or not hunting foxes with hounds is necessary or cruel.’
    • ‘What struck me was the genuine enjoyment of the day, the health of the hounds (hunting hounds are starved before chasing a fox, and get badly injured) and the lack of cruelty involved.’
    • ‘In Drag Hunting, a pack of hounds follows a scent laid by a human rather than pursuing a live quarry.’
    • ‘The hounds pick up the scent, and their prey is on the run, over open ground, across field, ditch and hedge, until cornered, exhausted, he stands his ground for the final, bloody, struggle.’
    • ‘The pack of harrier hounds - a smaller breed of dog than foxhounds, but larger than beagles - is kept at kennels near Gisburn.’
    • ‘For thousands of years nomadic tribes of the Middle East have bred a hunting hound called the saluki.’
    • ‘Billy thinks that maybe on moonlit nights, Old Dan will be able to hear the baying of hunting hounds.’
    • ‘The hunting with hounds ban came into force on Friday and at the weekend four Hampshire hunts turned out - all passed off relatively peacefully despite a kill…’
    • ‘Why can't they simply switch to drag hunting, when the hounds follow a scent which has been laid down in advance, and which no one - certainly not the new legislation - seeks to ban?’
    • ‘I also know that I have never found any evidence to demonstrate that hunting with hounds is an effective way of getting rid of foxes, a pest that was bred in large numbers in order to sustain fox-hunting.’
    • ‘Before the runner sets off, he is put in an enclosed space with the hounds that then track his scent.’
    • ‘Exemptions to the hunting ban include hunting an artificial scent trail, exercising hounds, and using no more than two dogs to flush a wild animal to be shot or killed by a bird of prey.’
    dog, hunting dog, canine, mongrel, cur
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with modifier A person who avidly pursues something.
      ‘he has a reputation as a publicity hound’
      • ‘When an insane publicity hound like this candidate finishes first in a congressional primary, the Republican Party has embarrassed itself.’
      • ‘Mind you, to be called ‘unpatriotic’ and an ‘anti-Semite’ by this shameless publicity hound has to be a compliment.’
      • ‘Brennon is the real horror hound of the writing team responsible for this version of the film.’
      • ‘When Paramount's lawyer charged that the author was a publicity hound, Dreiser jumped to his feet and shouted, ‘That's a lie!’’
      • ‘This book is a great read for any music lover, vinyl hound or not.’
      • ‘There is not enough general coverage for the average player but too much old, out-of-date material to satisfy the very strong theory hound.’
      • ‘So there goes the number one glory hound of the Queensland Government!’
      • ‘While Margolese is not an obvious high-glam media hound, he is definitely not a low-road radio guy either.’
      • ‘Thanks to reader GDV, who pointed out the misattributed quote, and also to thread hound Mork, who noticed the same thing and laid out the facts.’
      • ‘But I'm not a huge quality hound anyway, as long as it's in focus and I can hear it, I'm usually happy enough as long as the movie is good.’
      • ‘Her quietness, simplicity and complete disregard for the publicity hounds of the West puzzled reporters - but won her a very deep respect.’
      • ‘At New York University and Columbia, Greenspan honed his economics skills and earned a reputation as a tireless data hound.’
      • ‘Underneath, his light-blue oxford was soaked, proving that the Northwest Passage could still make a sea hound sweat.’
      • ‘It can backfire a little, particularly if you are a hound for constructive criticism.’
      • ‘Back in 1904, immigrant water baron William Mulholland arrived here with Frederick Eaton, the retired L.A. mayor and water hound.’
      • ‘We had 10 years to get his measure, and we got it well enough: he is a publicity hound, an arch opportunist, a cold-eyed political calculator - a hard man, it has to be said, to like, if not to respect.’
      • ‘I think our police chief is a media-savvy publicity hound, overly obsessed with his own public image and the image of his force.’
      • ‘The brown haired officer was clearly enjoying her cup, savoring it like a true coffee hound.’
      • ‘I was bemoaning the lack of camera while techno hound Bill got busy with his new cell phone.’
      • ‘In between them, though, I am an admitted and voracious sex hound, not to mention a source of amazement to my friends.’
    2. 1.2informal, dated A despicable or contemptible man.
      • ‘Not surprisingly, this gruesome war against the darkest recesses of the human spirit has left him a battered old hound, riddled with scars and guilt.’
      • ‘Is this old Hollywood hound learning new tricks?’
      • ‘This marks an interesting divide because women - especially California women - have certainly been willing and eager to vote for that other rapacious hound.’
      scoundrel, villain, rogue, rascal, brute, animal, weasel, snake, monster, ogre, wretch, devil, good-for-nothing, reprobate, wrongdoer, evil-doer
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    3. 1.3 Used in names of dogfishes, e.g., nurse hound, smooth hound.
      • ‘This is the more common of the two species of Smooth Hound.’
      • ‘Over the last few years smooth hounds have increased so heavily off Rhyl that I can now specifically target this species.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Harass, persecute, or pursue relentlessly.

    ‘his opponents used the allegations to hound him out of office’
    ‘a tenacious attorney general who had hounded Jimmy Hoffa and other labor bosses’
    ‘he led the race from start to finish but was hounded all the way by Phillips’
    • ‘Lindy was persecuted, hounded by the media and the hearing, for security purposes, was relocated to Darwin.’
    • ‘For doing this they were hounded by ridicule and persecution out from among their former associates.’
    • ‘I don't like the idea of someone being hounded by anonymously sourced allegations in the press.’
    • ‘He added, ‘This did not prevent endless hysterical, persecutory coverage with tabloids hounding doctors and managers.’’
    • ‘He is taking the risk of becoming a public figure with all the attendant hassle of being hounded by photographers and journalists.’
    • ‘Since then, despite making regular payments, I have been hounded and harassed and feel the company has been arrogant throughout.’
    • ‘There's been press hounding her, harassing her.’
    • ‘All too often, burnt out teachers are hounded out by bullying managers, failing to recognise that there is still much to offer if the right flexibilities are allowed.’
    • ‘So, the betting must now be that Charles will harried and hounded by sections of the media until he screams for mercy and agrees to do whatever they want, whenever they want.’
    • ‘To those supporters of Jim Jefferies, the former manager who left amid scenes of acrimony last year, or former chairman Deans, he is a hate figure to be hounded and harried.’
    • ‘I got other troubles besides the hospital hounding me.’
    • ‘Even the draft dodgers are not pursued and hounded.’
    • ‘It was on your mother's hounding that she agreed.’
    • ‘The other young ladies arrived, and Miss Fairfax found herself hounded with questions.’
    • ‘In fact, I would generally harry, hassle and hound them until they give up or leave the country.’
    • ‘He was hounded out of his home city, citing racist harassment by the police.’
    • ‘No one will badger, harass, bother or hound you about your progress, or lack thereof.’
    • ‘At the time of the Nazi occupation of the South of France under the Vichy government, he closely collaborated with the Gestapo, hounding those Jews fleeing Nazi persecution through Irún into Spain.’
    • ‘Credit card companies hound people constantly.’
    • ‘So it is to kind of hound people out though, isn't it?’
    harass, persecute, harry, pester, bother, trouble, annoy, badger, torment, bedevil, keep after
    force, drive, pressure, pressurize, propel, push, urge, coerce, impel, dragoon, strong-arm
    pursue, chase, follow, shadow, give chase to, follow on the heels of, be hot on someone's heels
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English hund (in the general sense ‘dog’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hond and German Hund, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek kuōn, kun- ‘dog’.

Pronunciation

hound

/hound//haʊnd/