Definition of horse race in English:

horse race

noun

  • 1A race between two or more horses ridden by jockeys.

    • ‘Competitors came from across Alberta, B.C. and Manitoba to compete in wild cow milking, team branding, team sorting, a ranch horse competition, horse race and bronc riding.’
    • ‘But Ken Holmes and Moira Emmett, from Cliffe, near Selby, vowed to compete in a separate race today, despite trustees of the horse race urging them to think again.’
    • ‘In the chariot race or the horse race, they had a professional charioteer or professional jockey to ride them.’
    • ‘This will be followed by a furlong dash horse race and a wheelchair race.’
    • ‘Interspersed with Jimmy John's memorabilia were other local scenes: A crowd watching a horse race at the Montgomery County fair, 1948.’
    • ‘Nevertheless Gartside and Cervera, though technically neat, struggled to find the humour in dressing as jockeys riding a symbolic horse race from Siberia to Moscow.’
    • ‘The Mascot Grand National is as hotly contested as the slightly more famous horse race which bears the same name and this year's result was not without controversy.’
    • ‘It's a horse racing movie, and you can't go wrong with those… even if all else fails, it's pretty hard not to make a horse race exciting.’
    • ‘The Il Palio bareback horse race around the Piazza del Campo is a sight to be seen.’
    • ‘Numerous sports and games are played at the religious festivals of the Mordvins, especially foot races and horse races, and other contests.’
    • ‘In the local races the horse race was won by Eddie Doocey, with Pat Flannery in second place.’
    • ‘Kerry Group are sponsors of the 10-furlong open horse race of 800, called The Kerry Group race.’
    • ‘Twenty horses will contest the most important horse race in the United States.’
    • ‘A horse race is much harder to predict than a human race because horses compete at different distances, at hundreds of tracks around the country where the conditions vary tremendously.’
    • ‘He raced to the crime scene like a horse in a horse race.’
    • ‘If you fix a horse race, well, it's mean, and people lose money, but if you fix a truck bombing…’
    • ‘Loathed by animal welfare activists, the Omak Suicide Race is perhaps the most dangerous and brutal horse race in the world.’
    • ‘But it's one of these things like a longshot in a horse race - your chances of winning are very small, but if you win, you win really big.’
    • ‘Not a natural one, I think, and what he would have gone for more was the rhythm of riding a horse, rather than the rhythm of a horse race, with the rising to the climax and going past the post and so on.’
    • ‘It is New York's greatest horse race, it is my favorite horse race.’
  • 2A very close contest.

    ‘eight hours after the polls closed, the election was still a horse race’
    • ‘And according to the latest polls, Schroeder may even be ahead, though within the margin of error, so it really is a horse race.’
    • ‘But we expect to be up late tonight in Arizona, because the polls show that was a horse race before Election Day today.’
    • ‘I mean, I know a lot of journalists and you know even more journalists and I've never heard a single one say you know, I really wish it were a horse race.’
    • ‘Let's have more competition, more voices and choices on the ballot, which is what the American people want, so we can pay attention to the real big issues, instead of the horse race and tactics.’
    • ‘As the first horse race of the season draws close in Iowa, the whole machinery of political business as usual has clattered to life to chase after Howard Dean.’
    • ‘The press always likes a good horse race, and you know, it brings viewers in.’
    • ‘Ronnie was a hell of a player, and he had an absolute shotgun for an arm, but I'd have to say it was a pretty good horse race as to who was the best ballplayer on some of those teams.’
    • ‘First, inevitably, his status as a front-runner has caused Democrats, spurred on by a media that wants a good horse race, to take a much closer look at him.’
    • ‘Oh, no, no, because as much as we get criticized for concentrating on the horse race, when we don't concentrate on the horse race, people want to know about the horse race.’
    • ‘You see, we're all in this horse race together [some might prefer the term ‘rat race’].’
    • ‘If they did, the president would be 10 points ahead, not in a dead-heat horse race.’
    • ‘Instead, they say, the media just love a horse race!’
    • ‘It does mean that Keyes can make the race interesting; maybe even a real horse race, and that's no laughing matter for the Democrats.’
    • ‘And frankly, regulation just isn't considered as sexy as a presidential horse race or a groundbreaking decision by the Supreme Court.’
    • ‘You have a good point, Michelle, though, it is the horse race though rather than the competition of ideas that drives most political coverage.’
    • ‘They're much too busy, you see, covering the horse race of the election to actually question anything one of the Rich Men says.’
    • ‘Oh, yes, people are obsessed with the horse race, and who wins this and who wins that, without looking at the big picture.’
    • ‘Let's take a look at some of the most recent polls nationwide, as far as the presidential horse race, as it's called, is concerned.’
    • ‘Ric, exit polling is not designed to give numbers on the horse race itself, but rather on the attitudes and opinions that influenced the voters in their decisions.’
    • ‘Yet journalists by and large ignored his troubling inconsistency - that's the nicest term for it - and concentrated instead on his standing in the horse race.’