Main definitions of hooker in English

: hooker1hooker2hooker3

hooker1

noun

  • 1North American informal A prostitute.

    • ‘The Europa was a strip joint, drug den and haven for hookers, particularly under-age girls.’
    • ‘When driving the seedier strips in Hollywood, I no longer look at the prostitutes on the street as mere hookers but as potential victims in a mechanized criminal network.’
    • ‘Because the work is demanding and intimate, they see themselves as closer to therapists than to hookers - and have deep, long-lasting ties to their regulars.’
    • ‘The bad news is that he was with a woman who looked like a hooker.’
    • ‘Someone should tell this man that it might be cheaper and easier to locate a caring hooker at a brothel.’
    • ‘I left the front desk and spotted a sexy hooker hanging out on a nearby bench.’
    • ‘I asked him if he had slept with this girl, a hooker on cocaine stripping for a living.’
    • ‘It's full of hookers and prostitutes, and you may even be lured into their traps.’
    • ‘No, instead he walks on and starts up a conversation with a hooker on the next street corner.’
    • ‘Next thing he's going to be cheating on me with hookers or lap dancers.’
    • ‘She winced at the sight of them, holding onto his hand out of fear that they would grab her and lead her into their world of hookers and prostitutes.’
    • ‘And I'm not even going to think about the people who think that hookers are fair game.’
    • ‘It was barely mid afternoon and the hookers on the streets were already on call, as if they needed to reach a quota before the next morning.’
    • ‘Pimping, hookers, all sexual acts and explicit language have been censored in the Australian version.’
    • ‘According to a 1999 study on street prostitution, the city has about 500 hookers plying their trade openly.’
    • ‘Since Street Watch, which involves recording information about kerb crawlers and hookers, was launched in 2001, the number of prostitutes on Swindon streets has fallen from more than 20 to four or five.’
    • ‘On the other end of the spectrum is Tim, 47, a writer, who confessed to his now-wife that he used to see street hookers regularly.’
    • ‘Who was the dude in New York that fell in love with a hooker?’
    • ‘The subject matter alone - serial killers and kinky hookers - could have sent the film spiraling into sensationalism.’
    • ‘Many of the 20 or so minor characters - various thugs, hookers, a pimp and a porn director - are forgettable clichés.’
  • 2Rugby
    The player in the middle of the front row of the scrum, who tries to hook the ball.

    • ‘Pratt can play in a number of positions - wing, stand-off, hooker or even loose forward.’
    • ‘Paul was impressive last week against Salford after switching from scrum half to hooker early on after Aaron Smith suffered a head injury.’
    • ‘The man who stood out in the lineouts against the Italians was new captain Bobby Skinstad, but the wet conditions will make it difficult for the hookers to get the ball in straight when throwing at the back.’
    • ‘The changes included a first cap for substitute flank Tim Dullane and a complete reshuffle of the front-row to accommodate reserve hooker Hanyani Shimange.’
    • ‘And of course there was the odd little bit of wizardry with the ball that hookers are not supposed even to contemplate never mind attempt.’

Pronunciation

hooker

/ˈho͝okər//ˈhʊkər/

Main definitions of hooker in English

: hooker1hooker2hooker3

hooker2

noun

  • 1A one-masted sailboat of a kind used especially in Ireland for fishing.

    • ‘Hookers were used throughout the West of Ireland for over a hundred years, as both fishing boats and cargo vessels.’
    • ‘Galway's traditional fishing vessel known as 'the hooker', is an intricate piece of craftsmanship and the sight of her strikingly elegant sails has always been a feature of Galway Bay.’
    1. 1.1Nautical informal An old boat.
      • ‘The sun burned through the haze of the spume filled sky as the gallant old hooker drove down each wave.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Dutch hoeker, from hoek ‘hook’ (used earlier in hoekboot, denoting a two-masted Dutch fishing vessel).

Pronunciation

hooker

/ˈho͝okər//ˈhʊkər/

Main definitions of hooker in English

: hooker1hooker2hooker3

hooker3

noun

North American
informal
  • A glass or drink of undiluted brandy, whiskey, or other liquor.

    • ‘When he hung up, he poured himself a stiff hooker of gin.’
    • ‘After this surprising display of gratitude he took his guests into the house and treated them to a couple of stiff hookers of excellent cognac.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

hooker

/ˈho͝okər//ˈhʊkər/