Definition of hooey in English:



North American
  • Nonsense.

    ‘your interest is just a lot of hooey and I know it’
    • ‘Collective power and student support seemed like a lot of hooey to me.’
    • ‘But that just sounds like hooey to most players.’
    • ‘Musselman is the son of the late Bill Musselman, who once coached Cleveland and Minnesota and gained a reputation as a man who wouldn't tolerate any hooey.’
    • ‘It was his task to persuade us that the Big Bang was a lot of hooey.’
    • ‘Dr. Peter Hurd initially thought the idea was ‘a pile of hooey,’ but he changed his mind when he saw the data.’
    • ‘Forget all this hooey surrounding so-called political correctness.’
    • ‘And all that hooey about what an honor it is to be nominated does not wash.’
    • ‘I'm here to tell you that this is a bunch of hooey.’
    • ‘Most readers already know that the official statistics are a pile of hooey, routinely manipulated to demonstrate an economic fantasy that doesn't really exist.’
    • ‘In practice, this is a load of hooey; one company is buying the other.’
    • ‘It may be a bunch of hooey, but it sure is fun hooey.’
    • ‘That's just so much hooey, but then fiction always sells better than nonfiction, doesn't it?’
    • ‘Everything except the first three paragraphs is total hooey.’
    • ‘She thought that all that stuff she heard about guys and their cars was just a bunch of hooey but now she wondered if there wasn't some validity in those claims.’
    • ‘I'd have to classify both those reasons as, well, hooey.’
    • ‘That's absolute hooey, as has been widely reported in the media.’
    • ‘To paraphrase Garrison Keillor, I used to think that literary awards were a bunch of hooey.’
    • ‘Now, in high school I would have thought this was hooey, for a lot of reasons.’
    • ‘But that's all hooey, say new-style teachers such as Zeer.’
    • ‘My orthopedist just laughs and says that's hooey.’


1920s (originally US): of unknown origin.