Definition of homogeneous in English:

homogeneous

(also homogenous)

adjective

  • 1Of the same kind; alike.

    ‘timbermen prefer to deal with homogeneous woods’
    • ‘More products are becoming homogeneous commodities for which uniformity of size, quality and taste is absolutely essential.’
    • ‘However, these results were based on a sample of university men who were fairly homogeneous in age, sexual experience, and frequency of intercourse.’
    • ‘This means that students within each school are relatively homogeneous in terms of academic ability, while the schools show wide variation in the academic ability of their first-year intake.’
    • ‘At the beginning of the experiments, seedlings were homogeneous in terms of length.’
    • ‘The risk is not a society of beautiful but homogeneous mannequins.’
    • ‘This notion of difference focuses on women as homogeneous; as though they all are alike, and different from men in the same way.’
    • ‘The Kurds are more homogeneous than Iraqis as a whole, and yet even in the Kurdish areas, for about four years, there was essentially civil war.’
    • ‘The study shows that property taxes are most regressive in municipalities where homeowner incomes vary widely but property values are relatively homogeneous.’
    • ‘The sample used in the study was relatively small (compared to previous studies) and was made up of relatively homogeneous individuals making it difficult to generalize the results to the wider population.’
    similar, comparable, equivalent, like, analogous, corresponding, correspondent, parallel, matching, kindred, related, correlative, congruent, cognate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Consisting of parts all of the same kind.
      ‘culturally speaking the farmers constitute an extremely homogeneous group’
      • ‘This may explain why during the 20th century relatively homogeneous Scandanavia was able to build a welfare state, where melting pot America baulked.’
      • ‘We need to have homogeneous traffic if the problem of jams and slow moving traffic is to be solved.’
      • ‘Many Chileans almost glorify the country's physical isolation, as they consider it a key factor in allowing the creation of a homogeneous society.’
      • ‘In Russia, the ethnic and geographic diversity of the population ensured its transition would be more difficult than that in the more homogeneous and smaller Baltic states or eastern European countries.’
      • ‘She demonstrates that even seemingly homogeneous groups had subgroups that thought very differently about compulsory insurance.’
      • ‘These findings confirmed the contention that when considering competence and self-esteem, single-parent children cannot be treated as a homogeneous group.’
      • ‘The legend in Australia was that everyone is the same, living in a classless, regionless, ethnically homogeneous society with the same history and a universal accent.’
      • ‘At each meeting, it has struck me clearly that the party attracts not only smaller and smaller crowds, but the make-up of the crowd has become more homogeneous and less diversified.’
      • ‘As a result, they end up with very homogeneous institutions, like major media, which reflect the world view of a self-selecting few.’
      • ‘The sample was very homogeneous, consisting primarily of well-educated White women.’
      • ‘There is little doubt that if this were a more racially homogeneous country, capital punishment would have gone the way of the dodo bird 30 years ago.’
      • ‘The cadets' problems must come from the fact that they live in a homogeneous and closed environment and under constant pressure of all sorts of compulsory norms and rules.’
      • ‘The thousands of offenders released each year from Colorado prisons cannot be treated as an homogeneous group nor assisted in a standardized manner.’
      • ‘Perhaps the hybridity is difficult to see on the surface, given how homogeneous Argentinean society appears to be, especially in terms of race and class.’
      • ‘Until the Second World War nearly all the countries of Europe had very homogeneous populations and very little recent experience of immigration.’
      • ‘It is a crime committed not against members of ethnically or racially or religiously diverse groups but only against members of ethnically or racially or religiously homogeneous groups.’
      • ‘A culturally homogeneous society whose members subscribe and adhere to one system of beliefs and practices is in the realm of fiction.’
      • ‘China is for the most part an extremely homogeneous society composed of a people who share one language, culture, and history.’
      • ‘In 1983, three pairs of permanent plots, each 5 x 5 m, were established in the study wood in sites with homogeneous vegetation.’
      • ‘Through her work, Bertrand questions the desirability of a homogeneous world where emotional and physical diversity have been eradicated.’
      uniform, identical, unvaried, unvarying, consistent, similar, undistinguishable
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Mathematics Containing terms all of the same degree.
      • ‘In this work, Moritz Cantor has discovered, Feuerbach introduces homogeneous coordinates.’
      • ‘Here is a homogeneous equation in which the total degree of both the numerator and the denominator of the right-hand side is 2.’
      • ‘With few exceptions, non-quadratic homogeneous polynomials have received little attention as possible candidates for yield functions.’
      • ‘A test of homogeneity also was conducted to determine if the 1986 and 1987 regression coefficients were homogeneous and could be pooled.’
      • ‘This is what you do with homogeneous differential equations.’

Usage

The usual spelling is homogeneous, and the spelling homogenous is traditionally regarded as an error. Homogenous is a different word, a specialized biological term meaning ‘having a common descent,’ which has been largely replaced by homologous. From the evidence of the Oxford English Corpus, the spelling homogeneous has become significantly less common since 2000, and around a third of citations for the word now use the form homogenous. This can now be regarded as an established variant

Origin

Early 17th century (as homogeneity): from medieval Latin homogeneus, from Greek homogenēs, from homos ‘same’ + genos ‘race, kind’.

Pronunciation

homogeneous

/ˌhōməˈjēnēəs//ˌhoʊməˈdʒiniəs/