Main definitions of holt in English

: holt1holt2

holt1

noun

  • 1The den of an animal, especially that of an otter.

    • ‘The trust has also built artificial holts in which otters can breed, and encouraged farmers, landowners and the public to do the same.’
    • ‘They have built a false otter holt, or den, by the river - its exact location is a carefully kept secret - and there are unconfirmed reports that an otter-like creature has been seen in the location.’
    • ‘Wild bird cover crops, an otter holt and boxes for owls, kestrels and bats all contribute to wildlife diversity.’
    • ‘A holt has been built on the banks of the River Wharfe to encourage the animals to continue using the river.’
    • ‘The otter holt is among the most popular displays.’
    • ‘First, we scramble around rockpools in the furthest corner of the bay, to investigate an otter's holt, hidden under flat rocks.’
  • 2North American dialect A grip or hold.

    • ‘He couldn't get a holt on any money, so I told him about the Farmers' Loan’
    • ‘But the new teacher, very wise, and understanding June's spirit, soon enough found a way to get a holt on the girl's heart strings.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in holt (sense 2)): variant of hold.

Pronunciation

holt

/hōlt//hoʊlt/

Main definitions of holt in English

: holt1holt2

holt2

noun

dialect, archaic
  • A wood or wooded hill.

    • ‘Miller also refers to a change in this landscape, presumably after enclosure: ‘The crofts and garths, holms and holts… were no longer known’.’
    high ground, rising ground, prominence, eminence, elevation, rise, hillock, mound, mount, knoll, hummock, tor, tump, fell, pike, mesa
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Middle Dutch hout and German Holz, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek klados ‘twig’.

Pronunciation

holt

/hōlt//hoʊlt/