Definition of holdout in US English:

holdout

noun

North American
  • 1An act of resisting something or refusing to accept what is offered.

    ‘a defiant holdout against a commercial culture’
    • ‘After ending a 50-day holdout, Smith is getting a lot of repetitions, running extra after practice and studying the playbook at night.’
    • ‘After first-round draft pick Sylvester Morris ended a 20-day holdout by signing a seven-year deal, the team didn't want to waste any time getting him on the field.’
    • ‘He has no hope of getting anything out of this holdout, so he basically is saying that he'd rather not play football than play for the Chargers.’
    • ‘Actually, these holdouts are about the money, more than ever.’
    • ‘Simon's holdout was bitter, but the change has been good for him, except for the injuries he suffered through.’
    • ‘So here we are, in the middle of what could be a very long holdout.’
    • ‘The problem is that in theory, in any given situation when someone refuses to sell we can't tell whether it is because of strategic holdout or subjective value.’
    • ‘Martin also defused any bad feelings that could have resulted from Yashin's holdout last season.’
    • ‘A prolonged contract holdout cost him most of last season, but he has made up for lost time in '03.’
    • ‘. Pollack has the talent and charisma to eventually become the leader of the defense, but his 20-day holdout set him back.’
    1. 1.1 A person or organization who resists something or refuses to accept an offer.
      • ‘Tonight, authorities try to get the last holdouts to leave New Orleans so they can focus on finding human remains some of which have blocked pumps getting that toxic floodwater out of New Orleans.’
      • ‘Count me as among the last holdouts on this issue.’
      • ‘And so we can just, in our mind's eye, try to figure out what might be going on in that jury room, how many holdouts there might be.’
      • ‘The 12 holdouts are refusing to abide by the new policy, and the union is angry at their treatment.’
      • ‘If you've got two or three holdouts, the rest will gang up on them and try to persuade them differently, if they can't, instead of a mistrial, I would predict a compromised verdict, such as murder two.’
      • ‘Designated the team's franchise player, he could be a training camp holdout for the second straight year.’
      • ‘I recall being one of the first to move on to another city and over the course of a few years eventually everyone, including the holdout 7th year PhDs, left.’
      • ‘Again today, they're putting off the prospect of forcing out the holdouts.’
      • ‘Some remaining holdouts are being forcibly taken from their homes, schools and synagogues.’
      • ‘So much valuable information is offered here that perhaps even the firmest of computer holdouts will be encouraged to join the twenty-first century in order to learn about the seventeenth.’
      • ‘The most notorious and outspoken holdout, however, has been the United States.’
      • ‘And if it hadn't been for just one holdout on Lyle's jury, Lyle would have been convicted of second-degree murder.’
      • ‘But politics notwithstanding, Hollywood, in particular, is often portrayed as the last great liberal holdout in California.’
      • ‘Under those facts, would your unwillingness to accept my offer evidence that you are just being a strategic holdout?’
      • ‘So if all the studios but one want to give the union a better offer, that one holdout can add weeks or months to an impasse.’
      • ‘The majority could be looking to acquit but there could be a couple of holdouts for guilty.’

Pronunciation

holdout

/ˈhoʊldaʊt//ˈhōldout/