Definition of hold the stage in US English:

hold the stage

phrase

  • Dominate a scene of action or forum of debate.

    • ‘Waterford holds the stage in the southern half of the country this weekend with the final of the Aer Rianta Cork Airport Munster Oaks tomorrow night.’
    • ‘Through that experience, I learned there was a special set of skills required for a dancer to be able to hold the stage alone.’
    • ‘They were self-effacing enough to let the singer shine while weaving complicated counterpoints behind her lead, but quite capable of holding the stage on their own when it came time to.’
    • ‘Luhrmann's wife and constant collaborator, the designer Catherine Martin, has given it majestic sets and striking, 1950s-style costumes that would hold the stage of any opera house in the world.’
    • ‘Heng holds the stage effortlessly, though in the first act he is sometimes hard to hear.’
    • ‘She held the stage like few solo singers can with her spellbinding vocals and her guitar work which combined rhythm and lead work.’
    • ‘These fresh-faced kids held the stage without flashy gimmickry, histrionics or rock star poses, relying instead on their songs and musicianship to do their talking for them.’
    • ‘Diana Quick holds the stage as the formidable Mrs Clandon and starts, to my eyes anyway, as a decent, solid figure, easily imagined at a suffragette demonstration - her place in world carved out by her own determined efforts.’
    • ‘Eclipsed by rival works of greater originality, specifically those of Birtwistle, Hamilton's operas failed in the longer term to hold the stage, despite the quantity of fine music they undoubtedly contain.’
    • ‘Tebaldi held the stage for a quarter of a century, from a 1946 Toscanini audition at La Scala to a Met farewell in 1973, when she was 54.’