Definition of hit in English:



  • 1Bring one's hand or a tool or weapon into contact with (someone or something) quickly and forcefully.

    ‘the woman hit the mugger with her umbrella’
    [no object] ‘use your words, but do not hit’
    ‘the police hit out with billy clubs’
    • ‘She suffered a fractured shoulder, cut hand and facial injuries and may have been hit with a belt by her attacker.’
    • ‘He doesn't like being hit in the body, and after three rounds he's not the same fighter.’
    • ‘Tyrhenae rolled over on the couch, accidentally hitting Tsuyoi on the head with her foot as she fell off.’
    • ‘One man suffered serious eye injuries as a result of being hit with a bottle.’
    • ‘They are taught that it is wrong to hit others and that they should not throw objects or break them.’
    • ‘Some common causes of fractures include falls, car accidents, child abuse, running, or something hitting the body.’
    • ‘As the metal weapon hit his injuries, he let out a grunt of pain and released the sword from his grasp.’
    • ‘This was followed soon after by Feder trying to execute a backhand shot, but accidentally hitting Robin in the arm.’
    • ‘Haley held the hammer just above the head of the chisel for a moment before flicking it back and bringing it down, hitting the jewel hard.’
    • ‘The feel of his boot hitting my side brought pain.’
    • ‘A punch connected with my jaw and sent my head back, another punch hitting my gut and bringing my body forward.’
    • ‘Then there was another group which hit their backs with wound up pieces of rope.’
    • ‘She let her gaze rest on the slipper for a moment, then brought it forward and hit it on her head.’
    • ‘And if you encounter any Mizaya, remember that the only way you can kill them with your weapons is by hitting them in the eyes.’
    • ‘He then hit Zoro over the head causing him serious injury, and took his wallet.’
    • ‘The weapon never hit its mark, bouncing off of a barrier made from blackened shadows.’
    • ‘The pain in his temple was killing him and his sides hurt from being hit, more than once.’
    • ‘One woman was left bleeding and suffered head injuries and another suffered a broken finger after being hit several times.’
    • ‘I'll almost certainly miss the fly and hit some poor unfortunate by-stander instead.’
    • ‘Previously, detainees have been hit or tortured during questioning, villagers say.’
    • ‘I blocked it by hitting it quickly back to his side.’
    strike, slap, smack, cuff, punch, beat, thrash, thump, batter, belabour, drub, hook, pound, smash, slam, welt, pummel, hammer, bang, knock, swat, whip, flog, cane, sucker-punch, rain blows on, give someone a, give someone a good beating, give someone a good drubbing, box someone's ears
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Accidentally strike (part of one's body) against something, often causing injury.
      ‘she fainted and hit her head on the metal bedstead’
      • ‘It was so dark out in the halls that he did not see the door and wound up hitting his head against it.’
      • ‘Anyway, down the bloke went and hit is head a right wallop on the pavement.’
      • ‘I managed to swerve and avoid hitting them but I grazed the bicycle and we all fell.’
      • ‘The clearing they were in was large enough for the Lady to fully spread her great wings without hitting a tree.’
      • ‘Trinity gasped as she sat up, her side hurt from hitting herself in her sleep.’
    2. 1.2(of a moving object or body) come into contact with (someone or something stationary) quickly and forcefully.
      ‘a car hit the barrier’
      • ‘The sound of her backpack hitting the ground brought her faithful puppy running.’
      • ‘That would depend on how forcefully it hits the floor and how much air pressure is in the ball.’
      • ‘He lost control of the car on a sharp bend, veered on to the wrong side and hit a Corsa then Mr Rowland's Mazda.’
      • ‘He dove down into the prepped hole and spread his wings before he hit the sand.’
      • ‘The sound of a toolbox hitting the ground brought her head back around.’
      • ‘They both moved quickly and never made a sound until they hit the ground.’
      • ‘The purpose of the arm is to protect your face or head from contacting or hitting the cement.’
      • ‘The sound of someone hitting the water brought her attention back.’
      • ‘He fell quickly and soon hit the metal grating that was only about one foot in width by two foot in width.’
      • ‘Mr Scaife said the women had severe head injuries consistent with being hit by a train.’
      • ‘At the least, get some forewarning before crossing the street at the wrong time and getting hit by a bus, and that sort of thing.’
      • ‘A forensic pathologist later said the injuries were not consistent with a fall, but from hitting a large, flat surface.’
      • ‘She stepped out of the crowd and was hit by a cyclist, receiving serious head injuries.’
      • ‘It is believed he was hit by a car and fell backwards, suffering serious head injuries which led to his death 10 days later.’
      • ‘To his credit he recovered quickly, rolling backwards as soon as he hit the ground.’
      • ‘He had taken only a few steps when he heard the sound of a body hitting the concrete behind him.’
      • ‘The feeling of someone's foot hitting her chair brought her back to reality.’
      • ‘The feel of his arm around me as he made sure my feet hit the ground brought me back to a time I missed.’
      • ‘Sure, he had been hit by a drunk driver, but maybe his injuries wouldn't have been so bad.’
      • ‘It was the sound of Sarah hitting the floor that brought him out of his trance like state.’
      crash into, run into, bang into, smash into, smack into, knock into, bump into, cannon into, plough into, collide with, meet head-on
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    3. 1.3informal Touch or press (part of a machine or other device) in order to work it.
      ‘he picked up the phone and hit several buttons’
      • ‘He hit the gate control button and the gate lifted, allowing for the van to pass through.’
      • ‘If you like what we do, then you can help us by hitting the donate button on the right hand side.’
      • ‘No one had seen them yet, so Simani led them into the lift, and hit the down button for the last level.’
      • ‘Fil is trying to listen to the tape recording he made of the dance recital, but he accidentally hits the erase button.’
      • ‘Naturally, the first thing the reader does is hit the Google button.’
      • ‘Keep hitting that F5 button and it could well be!’
      • ‘He pulled out two dollars and put it in the machine before hitting the Mountain Dew button.’
      • ‘My fingers sprung into life, hitting the keys quickly four times at different letters.’
      • ‘Daniel smiled at me as he quickly hit the play button and the screen blanked out as the movie started.’
      • ‘There are a variety of combos to pull off but they must be done by switching through your weapons while rapidly hitting the punch or kick button.’
      • ‘She quickly reached over, hitting the speakerphone button.’
      • ‘I would have to hit the connect button again and then try again to open a Web page.’
      • ‘Thank you to everyone who hit the Laptop Fund Paypal button in the past two weeks.’
      • ‘The girls fell silent as he hit the receive button and held the phone to his ear.’
      • ‘As the feeling rushes though me, I stand up from the plastic chair, take a deep breath and hit the Press to Exit button.’
      • ‘With a growl of frustration, he slapped his hand on the steering wheel before hitting the on button on his CD player.’
      • ‘He quickly hit the trigger over and over again sending beams dead on at the suit.’
      • ‘You can hit the contact button to simply connect with a pitch, or smack the power button to swing for the fences.’
      • ‘David ran to the computer lab and hit a few buttons until a layout of the safe house came up on the screen.’
      • ‘Today, however, he only laughed and shook his head before hitting the ignore button on his phone.’
  • 2Cause harm or distress to.

    ‘the area has been badly hit by business closures’
    • ‘At the start of the event, he had to try to clear his mind from the tragic events which had hit Spain.’
    • ‘The figures are the latest in a series of problems to have hit The Gathering Place.’
    • ‘The biggest emergency aid effort in history was under way last night to bring relief to millions hit by the Asian tsunami.’
    • ‘News that the property was to be demolished and redeveloped came as a relief to businesses which had been hit by the closure.’
    • ‘Clearly, the downward turn in the business cycle is hitting Germany hard.’
    • ‘Major problems hit Glossop town centre from 5pm after the River Etherow burst its banks.’
    • ‘The event in Umag was hit by a string of retirements on Tuesday.’
    • ‘With injuries hitting Bradford hard, Pratt's utility back status is proving an enormous boon.’
    • ‘However, the 57-year-old admits that he is concerned about the possibility of a recession hitting Scotland.’
    • ‘Staveley, near Chesterfield, has been hit hard by the closure of a number of major employers in the last decade.’
    • ‘I believe the charging regime is hitting local York businesses hard, and have never seen Micklegate so quiet as it has been in recent weeks.’
    • ‘Warminster town councillor Les Rose said the closures would hit the elderly hardest.’
    • ‘The virus has resulted in staff shortages at several hospitals but has hit Hope Hospital badly.’
    • ‘The service tax and the cess on each banking transaction will hit everyone badly.’
    • ‘Out came the story of the night's events, the aftershocks hitting Sofia harder and harder with each impact.’
    affect badly, devastate, damage, harm, hurt, ruin, leave a mark on, have a negative effect on, have a negative impact on, do harm to, impinge on
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    1. 2.1[no object]Make a strongly worded criticism or attack.
      ‘he hit out at suppliers for hyping their products’
      • ‘English Partnerships has hit back at claims it is not giving house owners value for money as part of a massive redevelopment scheme.’
      • ‘Residents of Vange today hit back in the war of words with Billericay over which is the better area in which to live.’
      • ‘Gibb urged fans to take a reality check as he hit back at criticism following a string of poor results.’
      • ‘Rochdale's dental chief has hit back at claims that the town is in crisis.’
      • ‘It is also Crawford's right to hit back at his critics, whether it be through his own mouth or his mother's.’
      • ‘It is the whole future of the National Health Service he wants to address, hitting back at claims he is shifting it over to private provision.’
      • ‘A pupil today hit back at constant criticism of her school as plans were revealed for it to become a sports college.’
      • ‘A driver has hit back at claims he is a thug by insisting he was only protecting his eight-month old daughter.’
      • ‘Exodus Travel have hit back over claims the vehicle was not properly licensed.’
      • ‘Last night McLetchie hit back, insisting he would not allow his opponents to make political capital from his case.’
      • ‘But Ms Cannings hit back, claiming the Yorkshire Post story had been misleading.’
      • ‘But dealers have hit back, claiming landowners are guilty of selling the trees themselves.’
      • ‘The officer in charge of policing in the North Cotswolds has hit back at criticism of the force.’
      • ‘Tesco have hit back with Royal Bank of Scotland research that shows they pay within 33 days on average.’
      • ‘Residents have hit back at claims the street in which they live is plagued by crime and prostitution.’
      • ‘The university last night hit back by insisting it was not funding students to go on a glorified pub crawl.’
      • ‘Police in Swindon have hit back at criticism over rising burglary rates.’
      • ‘Traffic chiefs have hit back at criticism that they are using speed cameras to make money, rather than save lives.’
      • ‘However, staff have hit back at the criticism saying the pub's business was being affected.’
      • ‘Unlike the early days of his campaign when he froze in the face of attack, Coors has hit back.’
      criticize, attack, denounce, lash out at, rant at, inveigh against, rail against, fulminate against, run down, find fault with
      condemn, censure, harangue, berate, upbraid, castigate, vilify, malign, assail, lambaste
      knock, slam, hammer, blast, lay into, pitch into, lace into, bawl out, bad-mouth, tear someone off a strip, give someone hell, give someone a roasting
      slate, slag off, monster, have a go at, rubbish
      pummel, cut up
      rate, reprobate
      vituperate, excoriate, arraign, objurgate, asperse, anathematize, animadvert on, denunciate
      retaliate against, respond to, reply to, react to, strike back at, counter, defend oneself against
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2(of a disaster) occur in and cause damage to (an area) suddenly.
      ‘the country was hit by a major earthquake’
      • ‘But later this week unsettled weather is set to hit the country, as a depression brings rain and winds.’
      • ‘What's the pattern of response from government, when disaster hits?’
      • ‘People are refusing to go inside as the area is still being hit by aftershocks.’
      • ‘Mr Kapu said the area would be hit by hunger if the farmers continued to sell their maize at give-away prices.’
      • ‘Last year the Island was struck head-on by Hurricane Fabian, the worst to hit Bermuda in fifty years.’
      • ‘It was the worst natural disaster to hit the United States since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.’
      • ‘But on the afternoon of their Edinburgh debut, their show was hit by disaster.’
      • ‘To then have other parts of the country, some not so far from that Otago area itself, hit by floods is rather ironic.’
      • ‘A couple who live only a quarter of a mile from the blast site woke up believing the area had been hit by an earthquake.’
      • ‘If you are lucky, earlies will be ready before blight strikes; if it hits your maincrop, you'll see yellow stains on the leaves, which then spread.’
      • ‘Last night health officials in Scotland said the measure would be a useful tool to fight a flu pandemic should it hit this country.’
      • ‘The North Battleford and Walkerton water disasters hit Canadians as a mighty shock.’
      • ‘Luckily for the people here it was not as powerful as the waves that hit other areas and caused a lot less damage.’
      • ‘Most people who return from holiday to find disaster has hit their home would only have thoughts for their own problems.’
      • ‘Even though the data is backed up, what guarantee is there that you can restore the data when disaster hits?’
      • ‘The next stop was Seenigama, a small fishing village that was severely hit by the disaster.’
      • ‘The storm has officially made landfall, squarely hitting the island of Cozumel and bringing with it 20-foot waves.’
      • ‘In the countries badly hit by this disaster, livestock and working animals can be vital to the lives of rural communities.’
      • ‘It seems that recent events have damaged the tourist trade in Sri Lanka and other areas hit by the tsunami.’
      • ‘Sea waves brought by Typhoon Nari hit an abandoned lighthouse on the shore of Keelung yesterday.’
    3. 2.3North American informal Attack and rob or kill.
      ‘if they're cops, maybe it's not a good idea to have them hit’
      • ‘Computer thieves hit Mesh Computers last night and swiped its office admin PCs.’
    4. 2.4informal Be affected by (an unfortunate and unexpected circumstance or event)
      ‘the opening of the town center hit a snag’
      • ‘Selby's hopes have been hit by injuries to several key players but they are hopeful the majority will pull through.’
      • ‘The unfortunate Washington man had hit hard times and was determined to get his hands on some loot.’
      • ‘We have got a small squad and when we have been hit with suspensions and injuries it has made it difficult.’
      • ‘In addition to an overall slowdown, the world economy could be hit by a series of shocks.’
      • ‘Services across the north west and Wales will be hit by the strikes while the deadlock continues.’
      • ‘His progress this time around has been hit by a serious injury setback.’
      • ‘The management committee at the St Michael's Centre is understood to have been hit by a massive rent increase.’
      • ‘Manchester Airport was hit by a small-scale strike by security workers today.’
      • ‘But he also suffered open wounds on his body and was then hit by a pneumonia-type virus.’
      • ‘The government and the companies have yet to be hit by coordinated strikes.’
      • ‘I know what it's like to be in a side that gets hit by injuries.’
      • ‘Others report that some of BT's websites have also been hit by the snag.’
      • ‘A group were handing out leaflets at the weekend in part of Oldham, hit by recent race riots, when police moved in.’
      • ‘Honduras has been hit by a week-long strike of heavy cargo truck drivers and oil workers.’
      • ‘However, in recent matches Baltinglass too have been hit by the injury bug.’
      • ‘These areas are also being hit by high rates of unemployment that put an added pressure on public facilities.’
      • ‘Agents agree that the top end of the market has been hit by the recent downturn.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the Nigerian education sector is also being hit by strike action.’
      • ‘Coming back to the form of two years ago, Westmeath have been hit by a chilling catalogue of injuries.’
      • ‘But the Flaxby Road outfit have been hit by a horrendous injury list that has robbed them of six first team players.’
  • 3(of a missile or a person aiming one) strike (a target)

    ‘the sniper fired and hit a third man’
    • ‘Mr Sykes, 52, an epileptic, was nearly hit by the missiles and later suffered a minor fit he blames on the attack.’
    • ‘The Ekupumleni coach and two players sustained hand injuries after being hit by the same bullet.’
    • ‘Eight people were injured during the trouble, some of them passing motorists hit by missiles.’
    • ‘Every one of the soldiers inside the Red Death was hit by hundreds of ricocheting bullets.’
    • ‘The missiles hit the target with a force the size of the planet they were orbiting.’
    • ‘It had not been hit by a missile either, nor had there been an onboard fire.’
    • ‘The gunman exchanged a volley, two bullets hitting Rift - one in the side and the other in the shoulder.’
    • ‘She twirled it once, aimed, and the bullet hit a target a few inches to the left of the bull's eye.’
    • ‘Other humanitarian relief agencies have also been hit in air strikes on at least two other occasions.’
    • ‘Cohen said at least one bullet hit Diallo while he was lying on the floor.’
    • ‘Huge plasma screens were used to show the assembled media grainy footage of missiles hitting their targets.’
    • ‘Every bullet hit its target as she accurately predicted the movements of her enemies.’
    • ‘Separately, another vehicle was hit with gunfire, wounding a marine.’
    • ‘An explosion rocked the hull as the back end of the helicopter was hit by the missile.’
    • ‘Violence returned six centuries later when Mile End was hit by London's first ever flying bomb.’
    • ‘He heard the German aircraft overhead and the explosions as the bombs fell, but had no idea the town centre was being hit.’
    • ‘Several bullets flew by him quickly one hitting the ground beside him.’
    • ‘The bullet hit one of his vitals and it was the reason he was in the hospital for so long.’
    • ‘One fan, hit by a missile hurled through a window, was treated for a head wound.’
    • ‘He was unfortunate enough to be hit in the head by a high-velocity military rifle bullet.’
    1. 3.1informal Reach (a particular level, point, or figure)
      ‘his career hit rock bottom’
      • ‘The family of an ill youngster have hit the right notes to find a new way of bringing a smile to his face.’
      • ‘Last year the figure reached capacity, with deliveries hitting the maximum so-called safe number of 4,800.’
      • ‘On some flights we are hitting that [figure], on some we're not.’
      • ‘He needs to hold the election quickly before the slump which will inevitably hit the country later this year as a result of that crisis.’
      • ‘In Britain, interest rates this summer hit their lowest level for 50 years.’
      • ‘At present the Irish labour market remains amazingly resilient despite unemployment hitting its highest level in three years.’
      • ‘The songs emerge with great intros but quickly hit a standstill and that's where it all goes downhill.’
      • ‘Our love affair with borrowing and spending now seems to be grinding to a halt, with retail sales figures hitting a 10-year low in April.’
      • ‘Share prices have tumbled globally, with Britain's FTSE share index hitting its lowest level for six years.’
      • ‘The Australian dollar may top 70 cents sometime this week after hitting its highest levels for nearly six years.’
      • ‘This is Silicon Alley where Lower Broadway hits trendy Greenwich Village.’
      • ‘Jewison saw Garland sick, nervous and depressed, yet hit every note and bring the house down.’
      • ‘As the coffee commodities market hits an all-time low this year, shade grown remains the next urgent frontier in the certification game.’
      • ‘Consumer optimism continues to rise, hitting its highest level since November 2001.’
      • ‘The advent of the free Metro newspapers in the main cities is likely to hit these figures even more.’
      • ‘Zimbabwe faces its fourth straight year of falling growth, while inflation is likely to hit triple figures.’
      • ‘Approvals for new house constructions have already hit the lowest level for three years.’
      • ‘I think this throws up an abundance of deeply shallow, poorly constructed art that very quickly hits its sell-by date.’
      • ‘After hitting a few wrong notes, Jedidah was able to copy the notes Vespera played perfectly.’
      reach, attain, touch, arrive at, get to, rise to, climb to
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    2. 3.2informal Arrive at or go to (a place)
      ‘we hit a diner for coffee and doughnuts’
      ‘it was still night when we hit the outskirts of Chicago’
      • ‘The McDonald's travelling caravan hits Montreal this Friday night at the Maurice Richard arena.’
      • ‘However, he was slightly upstaged by the huge cheer that greeted the first shaft of sunlight to hit Centre Court.’
      • ‘A tour of some of the best up and coming bands hits the Forum with both a matinee and evening show.’
      • ‘On Wednesday it's East London's turn and on Thursday the show hits Port Elizabeth.’
      • ‘Star Wars mania hit London last night as film big guns headed to the premiere of the latest instalment in the space saga.’
      • ‘Next Saturday the Paul Oakenfold hype machine hits Alberta playing his now mythic set of trance in Edmonton.’
      • ‘But before the event hits the Valley, a Rossendale woman will be hoping for success in the real version of the hit show.’
      reach, get to, get as far as, come to, make, make it to, set foot on, gain, attain
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    3. 3.3Be suddenly and vividly realized by.
      [with object and clause] ‘it hit her that I wanted to settle down here’
      • ‘The realization suddenly hit Sahara like a train crashing through a farm house.’
      • ‘Sometimes that realization hits the young more strongly than it does others.’
      • ‘The disappointment of being ignored by both Gauss and Cauchy hit Abel hard.’
      • ‘Realization hit Alsan like a blow as the brigand walked over to the twins' open coffin.’
      • ‘Suddenly the realization hits Jake like a ton of bricks - his old nemesis is back to settle one final score.’
      occur to, strike, dawn on, come to
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    4. 3.4[no object]Take effect.
      ‘we sat waiting for the caffeine to hit’
      • ‘Well, that triple dose of antihistamines really hit me on the way home from work last night.’
      • ‘He is finding it more and more difficult to walk as the effects of kidney failure hit.’
      • ‘I said slowly as I began to feel the first drink hitting me.’
    5. 3.5informal Give (someone) a dose of a drug or an alcoholic drink.
      • ‘He might spot them in time to hit me with another dose of the sedative and then I'd be in deep, deep trouble.’
    6. 3.6informal (of a product) become available and make an impact on.
      ‘the latest board game to hit the market’
      • ‘And the Bill Clinton autobiography hits stores this week.’
      • ‘The first revenue from Samba sales began rolling in last month, even before the product hits UK shelves.’
    7. 3.7informal Used to express the idea that someone is taking up a pursuit or taking it seriously.
      ‘more and more teenagers are hitting the books’
      • ‘It wasn't like she was going to hit all the clubs in the city at night and get all drunk.’
      • ‘So after a late lunch at Belgo's, with Ken coming along for a drink, we finally hit Borders.’
      • ‘She, Elaina and Lauren had stayed out all night, hitting all the parties on the campus.’
      • ‘How about hitting five exotic locales in one fab trip?’
      • ‘They were hitting this store as quickly as they could to look for those items that they saw advertised.’
  • 4Propel (a ball) with a bat, racket, stick, etc., to score or attempt to score runs or points in a game.

    • ‘Last Sunday, he hit Drew Bennett for a 23-yard touchdown pass with 17 seconds left to defeat the Houston Texans 27-24.’
    • ‘And then Blake got on another roll, hitting Taylor for 14 yards on third-and - 12 and then Terry Jones for 27 on the next play.’
    • ‘Enter Steve Nebraska, a goofy guy living in a small Mexican town with knack for hitting and pitching.’
    • ‘Or (to take a different example) someone familiar with a cricket bat regards it as a piece of wood for hitting balls.’
    • ‘Breaking on the right, he cut in and hit a low, hard shot which the keeper could only parry into the net.’
    • ‘Anderson is patient enough to wait for his blockers to open a hole, and when they do, he hits it quickly.’
    • ‘Four plays later, the Seahawks led 17-after Hasselbeck hit Alexander for a 3-yard TD pass.’
    • ‘Sinead Coakley won possession on the left and sped down the left wing and hit the post.’
    • ‘But Kitna quieted them quickly, hitting his first two passes for 25 yards.’
    • ‘Well, I can count on one hand the amount of cross-court nicks that were hit during this event.’
    • ‘As a result, they are able to break up passes and hit receivers quickly before a play can be made.’
    • ‘She was a tall, heavyset girl, known for her continuous power hitting.’
    • ‘Lee also should flourish at the plate hitting at Wrigley Field.’
    • ‘Mealey has a knack for hitting the hole quickly and bouncing off defenders.’
    • ‘Under pressure to hit it quickly, the midfielder boomed his shot high over the crossbar.’
    • ‘He feels it hinders him from hitting the holes as quickly as he wants.’
    • ‘McNair rolls right and hits McCareins for another first down, between three Steelers defenders.’
    • ‘Both have improved their deficiencies-Gotay in fielding and Murphy in hitting.’
    • ‘We quickly made the flip and caught Damon Stoudamire hitting Zach Randolph for the game winner.’
    • ‘Equally skilled at hitting, fielding, and base running, he led the Yankees to ten pennants and eight world championships.’
    1. 4.1Score (runs or points) by hitting a ball with a bat, racket, or stick.
      ‘he had hit 25 home runs’
      • ‘When the winning run is on base and a home run is hit, all runs and the batter are allowed to score.’
      • ‘Most nights, Kent would decline to shake hands when returning to the dugout after scoring a run or hitting a home run.’
      • ‘After getting some pine tar from the top of his gooey batting helmet, he hit a solo home run with two outs.’
      • ‘So, if you hit a home run you get one because you have scored.’
      • ‘Did you see that home run he hit the other night against the Cards?’
      • ‘Ichiro Suzuki of the Mariners rounds the bases after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning against the Indians at Safeco Field in Seattle, on Saturday.’
      • ‘This is like hitting a hundred home runs in a season: it's not just a record, it's an almost inhuman blowout.’
      • ‘Morales hit his spectacular home run in the third inning to the right field.’
      • ‘Pujols worked Harville to a full count before hitting his 23rd home run into the Houston bullpen.’
      • ‘Peter Allen hits a home run off of Carol Channing, scoring two runs.’
    2. 4.2Baseball [no object](of a batter) make a base hit.
      • ‘Can you tell me when Babe Ruth hit his first and last home runs in his banner season of 1927?’
      • ‘Once preoccupied with hitting for power, Matheny has spread his stance and concentrates on hitting to all fields.’
      • ‘Jason Varitek and David McCarty also homered for the Red Sox, hitting solo shots off Lance Carter in the eighth.’
      • ‘The following batter hits a single over the the head of the second baseman.’
      • ‘A cycle is completed when a batter hits a single, double, triple and home run in the same game.’


  • 1An instance of striking or being struck.

    ‘few structures can withstand a hit from a speeding car’
    • ‘This remark earned him another playful hit across the arm and an eye roll from Caelyn.’
    • ‘He yelled back as I went to make another hit but he just grabbed my arm and twisted it behind my back.’
    • ‘I'd felt several different hits when the horse knocked me down but hadn't really assessed the damage yet.’
    • ‘A novice archer would also bow to the target after the first hit of the day, while advanced archers would not.’
    • ‘Instead of a quick hit or slap, we now saw and heard a sustained series of blows.’
    • ‘After a few critical hits to the gut and head, she brought her hands together and unleashed a bright light in the form of alchemy.’
    • ‘More of Filho's hits are missing their targets, and suddenly he lands another low blow.’
    • ‘And she might have done so, for she was preparing her hand for the hit, when a knock was heard at the front door.’
    • ‘Then suddenly he felt a blinding hit at the base of his skull, which sent him back into a black abyss.’
    • ‘Vulture blocked 2 hits from Spruce, punched Spruce in the face, and kneed him in the stomach.’
    • ‘As in a real duel, if both fencers hit at the same time, both hits are counted.’
    • ‘The force of the hit knocked Anthony back until he was leaning against the Post Office wall for support.’
    • ‘They both were subjected to a daily barrage of insults, hits, cursings, and cruelty.’
    • ‘Which brings us to our quiz, when Googled, which drug has the most hits?’
    • ‘Zenith the Great will continue to destroy evil with his super critical hits!’
    • ‘He looked up, familiarity striking him like a hit to the head with a blunt object.’
    • ‘He flinched when Isabelle appeared beside him, anticipating another powerful hit.’
    blow, thump, punch, knock, bang, thwack, box, cuff, slap, smack, spank, tap, crack, stroke, welt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A verbal attack.
      ‘he could not resist a hit at his friend's religiosity’
      jibe, taunt, jeer, sneer, barb, cutting remark, barbed remark, attack, insult
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    2. 1.2North American informal A murder, typically one planned and carried out by a criminal organization.
      • ‘Security sources said there is little doubt that the hit was carried out by the LVF.’
      • ‘Oh, I was going to tell you about hits and contracts.’
      • ‘Murder detectives have stepped up the hunt for the gunman who executed a man in broad daylight in a gangland hit.’
      • ‘Then, one by one, his biggest hits are systematically murdered.’
      • ‘The police are holding two men who claim Tommy gave them $11,000 to carry out the hit.’
      • ‘This pre-established structure likewise is manifest in the details of Vincent's job: he has five hits to carry out before leaving the city the next morning.’
      • ‘Mr Hale claims he has also received underworld information which points to the murder being a professional hit.’
      • ‘Well, that's their plan, but it turns out your first hit is on the priest kidnapping godfather.’
      • ‘There was no secret as to the identity of the organisation that carried out the hits or its demands.’
      • ‘Unlike previous hits, this murder was filmed in its entirety on the club's security cameras.’
      • ‘He had been offered $50,000 to carry out the hit, and was jailed for life for the contract killing.’
      • ‘Presumably, the information that led to where these bodies are also would include who took part in carrying out some of these hits.’
      • ‘Because a gangster once saved his life, he now does hits for the mob, only communicating by carrier pigeon.’
      • ‘Is it really possible that they pass on charging Kidan for a killing if he was the guy who ordered the hit?’
      murder, killing, political execution, slaughter, butchery, homicide, liquidation, elimination, extermination, termination, doing to death, putting to death, martyrdom
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3Baseball
      short for base hit
      • ‘He threw only 21 of 42 pitches for strikes, allowed three hits and walked three.’
      • ‘Greinke, who allowed just four hits and struck out five, left with a 1-lead.’
      • ‘Beckett allowed seven hits but struck out nine and stranded six runners in scoring position.’
      • ‘Perry Nazerawich went all the way for the win giving six hits and striking out eight in seven innings of work.’
      • ‘In game two, pitcher Alisha Seifert '05 scattered three hits leading to the complete-game shutout of the Knights.’
  • 2An instance of striking the target aimed at.

    ‘one of the bombers had scored a direct hit’
    • ‘I have been here before, so when his hand goes behind his back, I let him have it with several direct hits.’
    • ‘Buckingham Palace had, after all, suffered direct hits during the Blitz.’
    • ‘But not one of the bombs scored a direct hit, though the very-near misses almost shook her to pieces.’
    • ‘Two direct hits with 120 mm armor-piercing shells caused no damage.’
    • ‘Two of the targets received direct hits from above, while the rest were sprayed by numerous fragments.’
    • ‘For the hot summer days ahead, Dimitri mixes, selects and scores a direct hit.’
    • ‘When it finally began to score direct hits Shinji noticed a blue-green orb appear around the fighter.’
    • ‘Two direct hits for run-outs put Southport on the back foot.’
    • ‘A direct hit would have occurred had you answered in a way that implied a logical contradiction.’
    • ‘It does not have to be a direct hit; the substation supplying your sector of the grid may be miles away, yet the line will go down.’
    • ‘Direct hits of asteroids that size are believed to not always make it to earth but instead explode in the atmosphere.’
    • ‘It would allow a missile fired by a fighter to react to evasive movements by its target, ensuring a direct hit.’
    • ‘Both he and Alex had scored direct hits, blowing most of Spencer's chest away.’
    • ‘The Gardai have scored some direct hits against the dealers in recent weeks.’
    • ‘HMS Steam Gun Boat No 7 fired two torpedoes at her, one of which scored a direct hit.’
    • ‘Results were impressive with the longest bomb only 50 ft away from the target and many direct hits.’
    • ‘In another scene, three aircraft come in, drop three bombs on Japanese artillery positions and score three direct hits.’
    • ‘Their carrier sustained roughly forty broadside plasma hits and continued to move forward.’
    • ‘The target showed five solid hits and once more the NRA referee verified the result.’
    • ‘Her friend's house took a direct hit, but fortunately the family were out.’
    • ‘For the most part, though, Fey hits her target dead-on.’
    1. 2.1A successful venture, especially in entertainment.
      ‘he was the director of many big hits’
      [as modifier] ‘a hit comedy’
      • ‘Along with old film hits, Hitesh also sings ghazals when the occasion demands it.’
      • ‘The hot Bombay mix promises a unique blend of classic and current Bollywood film hits, Punjabi folk songs and Hindi wedding songs.’
      • ‘The first film was a huge hit and no doubt the sequel will do great business.’
      • ‘Some films, mainly from Bollywood, manage to become super hits just on account of good music.’
      • ‘There are also what are known as sleeper hits - films that start small and get bigger and bigger through word of mouth.’
      • ‘Initially released in only one cinema it has become a word of mouth hit all over U.S. Europe and Australia.’
      • ‘It contains albums ranging from the rare pieces of Carnatic and Hindustani classicals to the latest Hindi film hits.’
      • ‘This was followed, in the 1940s, by a succession of cartoon film hits: Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo and Bambi.’
      • ‘The first film was a hit, and the bestselling series has won three children's book prizes.’
      • ‘Mexico has produced a wave of big hits and groundbreaking films in the past few years.’
      • ‘Weddings have played a pivotal role in some of the biggest British comedy hits.’
      • ‘So if I win for a role, and if the film is a big hit, I can share it with everybody.’
      • ‘The album has memorable original lyrics, and also others from various film hits.’
      • ‘The film was a hit in big cities, but did little in the American heartland.’
      • ‘It's no coincidence that both films were box office hits - and not just with African American audiences.’
      • ‘You could make a case for that being the message of his hit song.’
      • ‘And that broke the record for the most hit singles from a debut record by a woman or something.’
      • ‘He is the man behind some of the biggest hits in the Malayalam film industry.’
      • ‘The film became a massive box-office hit and my song was on the soundtrack album, which sold zillions of copies.’
      • ‘Adaptations from great classics, some of these films are all time hits.’
      success, box-office success, sell-out, winner, triumph, sensation
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2A successful film, pop record, or song.
      ‘he was the director of many big hits’
      • ‘The Alkaline versions of previously recorded Big Sugar songs were big hits and easily-satisfied the partisan crowd.’
      • ‘Bing Crosby's huge hit was not the only song of the era to combine memories and dreams.’
      • ‘Up next was Karma which belted out several hits from its latest CD in a 90-minute energetic performance.’
      • ‘The song was popular in the USA in 1919 and became a hit in British music halls the next year.’
      • ‘Most of the songs recorded are classic hits from the 40s and 50s.’
      • ‘Why would it be a discredit to her if she is savvy enough to understand when a song is a hit and decide to sing it?’
      • ‘When the audiocassette was released, the song was a hit, but the film was suspended.’
      • ‘The disco was thumping out the hits of the decade and the assembled guests had gone to town on the outfits.’
      • ‘There's another wee guy who was not quite all there and he used to go into the record shop and ask for Elvis' latest hit.’
      • ‘Both the songs were a big hit and there was no looking back since then.’
      • ‘Movie titles and pop music hits lined the top of the page.’
      • ‘The most difficult record to track down was Lita Roza's novelty hit, How Much Is That Doggie In The Window.’
      • ‘The guys expertly belted out the hits ringing in the last night.’
      • ‘Nelly and Kelly's recent hit, Dilemma, was the most contemporary song to be selected.’
      • ‘True to his words Robin has been touring Germany, belting out Bee Gee hits with the Frankfurt Philharmonic.’
      • ‘The soundtrack is a pounding ménage of hardcore hits.’
      • ‘The trio, who have a string of top 10 hits under their belt, will perform live alongside a host of music and soap stars.’
      • ‘At least that's the thought behind Blender magazine's list of the top 50 worst songs that became big hits.’
      • ‘In many cases the films flopped, but the songs became hits.’
      • ‘With a greatest hits compilation under their belts, The Headstones rock 'n' roll franchise seems to be squarely locked in place.’
      success, box-office success, sell-out, winner, triumph, sensation
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3informal A successful and popular person or thing.
      ‘handsome, smiling, and smart, he was an immediate hit’
      • ‘It was an immediate hit with the public and drew thousands of admiring visitors to Kelvingrove.’
      • ‘The event will be a hit with people of all ages, children as well as adults.’
      • ‘This puppet show was a big hit at the Fringe, combining music, song and laughs.’
      • ‘Immediate hits with both travelers and the industry, Web fares weren't even part of the airlines' original plan.’
      • ‘It's not surprising that her clothes should have proved a hit at Debenhams.’
      • ‘Try them and write to the magazine to let us know which ones were a hit at your house.’
      • ‘The nachos were a big hit at the table and for the price that we paid, the portion was well worth it.’
      • ‘The two little chilli plants were a big hit at work today, attracting lots of interest.’
      • ‘He was a big hit at the Anti-Sellafield concert and will be a great draw in Rostrevor.’
      • ‘Not all your designs have been immediate hits.’
      • ‘His toys are a big hit at Scindia Junction, Naval Housing Colony and Industrial Belt.’
      • ‘Drums proved to be a real hit at an event held in North Bradley at the weekend.’
      • ‘Her exquisite work on the tiles and her glass paintings were a big hit at the fair.’
      • ‘It made me a real hit at family parties as it kept the kids entertained for hours.’
      • ‘Donkey Kong and Mario were Nintendo's biggest hits yet and were the most popular arcade machines ever!’
      • ‘His Troy Game was an immediate hit, and is still to be found in the repertory of many companies.’
      • ‘Despite the aerodynamic challenges, the car ran very fast and was a big hit with the fans.’
      • ‘His striking level of consistency on the left side of defence has not only cemented his place in the team but has also made him a hit with the fans.’
    4. 2.4Computing An instance of identifying an item of data that matches the requirements of a search.
      • ‘Also, there appears to be a strange priorization thing going on with hits during a search.’
      • ‘And there are fewer than a hundred hits when searching for anything in the field.’
      • ‘The search generated 1848 hits, of which all but 100 were rejected as they did not meet the selection criteria.’
      • ‘One of the articles gives the botanical name of St. John's wort; she searches on that term; this search results in eight hits.’
      • ‘If I google myself, just about the only hits are of that poor unfortunate child who got attacked by a pit bull.’
    5. 2.5An instance of a particular website being accessed by a user.
      ‘the site gets an average 350,000 hits per day’
      • ‘I guess I'm surprised that after 6 months of starting to write this blog, it's getting hits from search engines.’
      • ‘The Napster case must have increased the music service's hit rate.’
      • ‘We really want this new site to start getting a decent amount of hits.’
      • ‘A few accolades for a well written, yet vitriolic post, a few extra hits, a few more readers.’
      • ‘In fact, the contract with the advertiser may specify that payment is by results, measured by hits or clickthroughs.’
  • 3informal A dose of a psychoactive drug.

    • ‘She was being reasonable - it was not possible to take hits of cocaine and also fold shirts and zip up duffels.’
    • ‘He answered honestly and said yes - he'd taken a hit of heroin a few hours before.’
    • ‘Becci was the first to reach for it, took a long deep hit, then tried to pass it to me.’
    • ‘You can't help yourself from taking another hit of that sweet, sweet pop rock.’
    • ‘Her blood shot eyes stared right through the girl as she offered her the last coke hit.’
    • ‘I got off her as best as I could and staggered as my head was still spinning from that last hit.’
    • ‘I was calling for an end to the Drug War long before I ever took my first hit of pot.’
    amount, quantity, measure, portion, dosage, drench, draught
    View synonyms


  • hit someone below the belt

    • 1Give one's opponent an illegal low blow.

      • ‘The bout turned nasty in the fourth, when Johnson - for the second time in the fight - hit Ruiz below the belt with a hard left hook.’
      • ‘Then Machimane hit Nel below the belt and the fight was temporarily stopped to give the champion time to recover.’
      • ‘He described Dube as a ‘dirty’ boxer who was always hitting him below the belt and throwing punches after the bell.’
      1. 1.1Behave unfairly, especially so as to gain an unfair advantage.
        • ‘If all of them are forced to pay royalty for every song they sing, they will be hit below the belt.’
        • ‘‘The department is hitting us below the belt,’ said Mbilini.’
        • ‘Carly is hurt by the comment and it hits her below the belt.’
        • ‘To top it all off, Walter's sudden fierceness hit her below the belt, and her legs suddenly went wobbly with desire.’
        • ‘‘Pattni appears to have hit Kenya below the belt at a time when the country was at its weakest,’ wrote the East African Standard.’
        • ‘First you hit them below the belt by making it harder for them to get elected.’
  • hit someone for six

    • see six
      • ‘This infection has really hit him for six and is now sitting at the bottom of his lungs causing lots of problems.’
      • ‘‘Selectors’ decisions have gone against me before but this one really hit me for six.’
      • ‘It would have been nice to reverse the scoreline from a couple of years back when they hit us for six.’
      • ‘The man behind the Australian Fast Bowler is back doing what he loves - stand up that will hit you for six.’
      • ‘Just another reminder of how something can suddenly hit you for six, emotionally, when you live abroad.’
      • ‘Luckily I was prepared but the shock of what had taken place hit me for six on the journey back to Taupo.’
      • ‘While it won't hit you for six, Wondrous Oblivion has enough charm in it to warrant your attention.’
      • ‘He was trying to hit me for six and I was trying to get him out.’
      • ‘It was obvious that the carbon monoxide had hit her for six, but now things were sliding out of control.’
      • ‘We were second best all over the park, and they hit us for six losing a goal so early on.’
  • hit the bottle

    • informal Begin to drink heavily.

      • ‘Will Jackson lose his chance at regaining the trust of his family, or will he go back to hitting the bottle?’
      • ‘Gerald soon finds himself driven back to his old habits, hitting the bottle and using sleazy journalistic tactics in a desperate search for the answers surrounding his ill-fated apartment building.’
      • ‘Word had reached me that he was going through a bad patch, hitting the bottle and living in a hostel for the homeless.’
      • ‘She was also hitting the bottle enthusiastically, believing she had been ‘misdiagnosed’ by the Priory.’
      • ‘The significant jump in the number of women who are dying from alcohol-related illness proves that more and more women are hitting the bottle.’
      • ‘‘It was like an alcoholic hitting the bottle again,’ Raihala said.’
      • ‘Barton Peveril's students are putting across a message which they hope will make other teenagers sit up and think about the perils of hitting the bottle.’
      • ‘The star has had a troubled time in the last few months after reportedly hitting the bottle again.’
      • ‘And I've been hitting the bottle in the evenings to help me get by.’
      • ‘She suffered from manic depression, and when she died after a long illness, Bellany - always fond of the drink - hit the bottle with venom.’
      drink, swallow, guzzle, slurp, attack, down, drink down, drink up, force down, get down, finish off, polish off, drain, empty, imbibe, have, take, partake of, ingest, consume, sup, sip, lap
      View synonyms
  • hit the ground running

    • informal Start something and proceed at a fast pace with enthusiasm.

      • ‘Despite hitting the ground running, the club know that they are just a loss or two away from a slump into the relegation zone.’
      • ‘We're over here in Ireland for a week-long camp, with the intention of hitting the ground running when the season starts.’
      • ‘While he did not trap that fast he certainly hit the ground running to scorch away from his opponents around the opening turn.’
      • ‘The man was hitting the ground running, thinking big.’
      • ‘We are hitting the ground running, and so far everything has exceeded our high expectations.’
      • ‘They hit the ground running and demonstrate leadership qualities at a faster rate.’
      • ‘If you're reading this magazine, you're already hitting the ground running.’
      • ‘‘Now we are hitting the ground running and we are ahead of the posse and we intend to stay ahead of the posse,’ said Mr Brennan.’
      • ‘Once again he hit the ground running and his early pace had him clear of his rivals before the bend.’
      • ‘Once hell breaks loose, the film hits the ground running.’
  • hit the hay

    • informal Go to bed.

      • ‘We got home safely, sat chatting for a while over steaming mugs of tea and then hit the hay for a couple of hours.’
      • ‘The weekend was finished off in the best way possible, with Amelia sleeping soundly from 8pm until 1am and me hitting the hay at 9.’
      • ‘I'll usually check my email once more before hitting the hay at night.’
      • ‘Whenever you wear make-up, you should always remember to wash it all off before hitting the hay.’
      • ‘I plan to go for a few beers down the local pub before hitting the hay.’
      • ‘My days started and ended early, with the clinic recommending that guests hit the hay by 9pm.’
      • ‘Our houseguest hit the hay at one and I went up to sleep.’
      • ‘Well, it's getting late and I need to hit the hay.’
      • ‘We settled down to watch some more mindless pap on the TV until it was time to hit the hay.’
      • ‘He's making his usual to-do list before hitting the hay.’
    • informal

      see hay
  • hit home

  • hit it off

    • informal Be naturally friendly or well suited.

      • ‘Ideally, they'll hit it off, become buds, and you'll never have to worry about it again.’
      • ‘We weren't really hitting it off, but Figi still decides to put her arm around my waist and squeeze me.’
      • ‘It so happened that they hit it off immediately and became best friends off the court.’
      • ‘She met this guy Tim at a party of a mutual friend and seemed to hit it off.’
      • ‘It wasn't long before all six of us hit it off, teasing and conversing like old friends.’
      • ‘So they decided to bombard me with personal questions about my best friend, and we hit it off at once.’
      • ‘He was glad his friends were hitting it off with Kelly, especially since the start of her day had been kinda rough.’
      • ‘If they hit it off, she'll be able to pass along a positive word to your other pals.’
      • ‘Carrie's friend Cathey had introduced the two and they seemed to hit it off immediately.’
      • ‘The two of them hit it off wonderfully and it was the start of a great friendship.’
      get on well, get on, get along, be on good terms, be friends, be friendly, be compatible, relate well to each other, feel a rapport, see eye to eye, take to each other, warm to each other, find things in common
      click, get on like a house on fire, be on the same wavelength
      View synonyms
  • hit the jackpot

    • 1informal Win a jackpot.

      • ‘The visitors, mostly lottery punters, are bringing food and money for the snake following news that villagers in Selangau hit the jackpot through betting on four-digit numbers chosen by the big snake, the Star said.’
      • ‘Guadalupe Lopez was playing the Wheel of Fortune machines at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa when she hit the jackpot, a casino spokesman said.’
      • ‘It's like going to Vegas and playing the slots: There's always the possibility of hitting the jackpot, so you keep feeding in the quarters.’
      • ‘If you can get these three cherries in a line, you have hit the jackpot, whether you measure success in money, in print acreage, in airtime, in pixels or in love.’
      • ‘Since hitting the jackpot nearly a fortnight ago Michael Turner, 44, and his partner Lesley Learad, 40, have resigned from their jobs at a manufacturing plant and a pharmacy.’
      • ‘One example cited is the closure in 1998 of a south Wales oil company when its lottery syndicate hit the jackpot.’
      • ‘Even the most worn-down residents retain a paltry hope in hitting the jackpot, making fifty-cent bets with Lou and imploring him, ‘Make me a winner, man!’’
      • ‘After the usual checks and balances were performed, Tony received his payment in one lump sum wired to his account within a week of hitting the jackpot.’
      • ‘Fourth and last, slot players can hit the jackpot while in the hole, or with modest enough earnings that they have no incentives to stop.’
      • ‘Sarsfields GAA club would like to congratulate Robbie Hegarty of Newbridge on hitting the jackpot in the club lotto recently when he won 14000.’
      win a large prize, win a lot of money, strike it lucky, make a large profit, make a fortune, make one's fortune, make money, be successful, be lucky
      clean up, strike it rich, rake it in, make a pile, make one's pile, make a killing, make a packet, make a bundle, make a pretty penny, hit the big time
      make a bomb
      make big bucks
      View synonyms
    • 2informal Have great or unexpected success, especially in making a lot of money quickly.

      ‘the theater hit the jackpot with its first musical’
      • ‘Accenture is gambling that one of those companies will hit the jackpot and create the next SAP, giving Accenture first crack at helping its clients install the revolutionary software.’
      • ‘They finally hit the jackpot when the Cowboys agreed to take their first-rounder next season plus second- and fifth-rounders this year.’
      • ‘Despite being an utter failure at his craft, German television director Wilfried Huismann hit the jackpot in persuading Lorenz to tell him her story.’
      • ‘And the time is right now to witness three of bodybuilding's hottest stars get diced and roll the dice onstage to see whose physique will hit the jackpot with the judges.’
      • ‘Although Pumping Iron was a massive, surprise success, Schwarzenegger didn't hit the jackpot until the release of the first Terminator film in 1984.’
      • ‘Well, I was out there for two different visits a couple of weeks each and I was actually chasing this species plus a couple of other species which are also not yet named and classified and I got lucky, hit the jackpot with this one.’
      • ‘After decades of trying one plantation crop after another without much success in the late nineteenth century, Malaya hit the jackpot with rubber trees in the early twentieth century.’
      • ‘In wine terms, Australia hit the jackpot with their big sweet Chardonnay and rough-necked Shiraz, but now there is a gap in the market for something with a few contours, some savoury tastes, some complexity.’
      • ‘The Mariners, of course, hit the jackpot in 2001 when they took a chance on Ichiro Suzuki, a Japanese baseball veteran with seven consecutive batting titles in his homeland.’
      • ‘New York Post columnist Ken Moran hits the jackpot in the opening of a recent column.’
      win a large prize, win a lot of money, strike it lucky, make a large profit, make a fortune, make one's fortune, make money, be successful, be lucky
      clean up, strike it rich, rake it in, make a pile, make one's pile, make a killing, make a packet, make a bundle, make a pretty penny, hit the big time
      make a bomb
      make big bucks
      View synonyms
  • hit the mark

    • Be successful in an attempt or accurate in a guess.

      • ‘Fewer than 150 schools across the whole country managed the same results with all 37 pupils at Sacred Heart hitting the mark.’
      • ‘But I don't think either of these explanations hits the mark.’
      • ‘When he hits the mark, Lee's a sharp observer of the silly side of life.’
      • ‘Since that's almost impossible, most authors agree it's best simply to write a darned good story - and hope it hits the mark.’
      • ‘With a couple of million of you reading today's Times, your collective predictions stand an extraordinarily good chance of hitting the mark.’
      • ‘He hits the mark from time to time with witty dialogue.’
      • ‘This is a pity, because she almost hits the mark.’
      • ‘Both reasons are plausible, but neither quite hits the mark.’
      • ‘It doesn't quite hit the mark, but the attempt is often engrossing.’
      • ‘In addition, his attempts at sarcasm do not always hit the mark; some come off as confusing and inappropriate.’
      have the intended effect, make the intended impression, strike home, hit the mark, be registered, be understood, be comprehended, get through, sink in
      View synonyms
  • hit the nail on the head

    • Find exactly the right answer.

      • ‘He hits the nail on the head with the current situation.’
      • ‘And north of the Border, Professor John Haldane hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘I believe that Bernard's comment hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘I think what that juror just said hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘Mark Grahame hits the nail on the head with his comments about the new breed of ultra-loud fireworks.’
      • ‘He also hits the nail on the head about another pet peeve - the substitution of rage with the therapeutic impulse.’
      • ‘And the piece you sent me really hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘Your analysis of the Dutch motives for voting no in the referendum hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘This piece by Martin in UWS hits the nail on the head.’
      • ‘These guys seem to have a knack for hitting the nail on the head, and their newest creation is as short and sweet as they come.’
  • hit the right note

  • hit the road (or trail)

    • informal Set out on a journey.

      • ‘I'll be hitting the road again tomorrow, and probably will be unable to blog for a few days.’
      • ‘Sunday after Sunday, Dermot and his friends hit the road and no journey was too long.’
      • ‘But as bad as things may seem, they're nothing compared to the disasters that await the production once it hits the road for England.’
      • ‘And millions of travelers are still hitting the road.’
      • ‘We hit the road and thankfully the journey was incident free.’
      • ‘We have our morning routine pretty well worked out since he's been hitting the road about 25 minutes after I leave.’
      • ‘So I spent a large chunk of the morning asleep, waking for a very light lunch before hitting the road.’
      • ‘Huge acts are hitting the road, but just try scoring tickets.’
      • ‘Right now, they are hitting the road in Ohio, then on to another battleground, Florida.’
      • ‘The film opens with the family hitting the road on a moment's notice, one step ahead of law enforcement agents.’
  • hit the roof

    • Suddenly become very angry.

  • hit the sack

    • informal Go to bed.

      • ‘I know there was no wound on my wrist before hitting the sack because upon retiring I took off my watch and did not observe any blemish in the left wrist area.’
      • ‘Watching them play last night was a nice way to end the day before hitting the sack with a smile.’
      • ‘Perhaps this headache had something to do with the fact that I hit the sack at 7:30 pm last night and slept for the entire night - double my usual night's sleep.’
      • ‘Well reckon I should hit the sack else I won't be able to get up tomorrow!’
      • ‘Once the two were out of hearing range, Stacy turned to Jen and asked, ‘So you hitting the sack with Michael or what?’’
      • ‘Got home around 12:30 or so, played around on the computer for a bit, then finished up Charlotte's Web before hitting the sack.’
      • ‘Anyhow, I want to do some reading before I hit the sack.’
      • ‘I work so hard all day long that when I finally get to get upstairs, I'm ready to hit the sack or just settle in and read.’
      • ‘Last night we only hit the sack around 3am, and tonight could be a late one.’
      • ‘Anyhow, I'm also cold and it's really late, so I'm going to do some reading, get through the exciting parts of The Moonstone, and hit the sack.’
      • ‘I recommend you clean your face with a scrubbing gel in the morning before going to work or at night before hitting the sack.’
      • ‘Man oh man, he kept talkin’ about some Model T Ford and all I wanted was to hit the sack.’
      • ‘Post-dinner, I decided to catch up with some reading before hitting the sack.’
      • ‘Late in the evening, when I announced I was ready to hit the sack, Graham asked: ‘How are you feeling after your restful day?’’
      • ‘But I am sleepy right now and I will be hitting the sack.’
      • ‘By the time we hit the sack, it was after two in the morning.’
      • ‘Having got that off my chest, I am going to have a shower, and hit the sack.’
      • ‘Would you like a hot chocolate before hitting the sack, Harley?’
      • ‘We went for another waltz down ‘Da Street’ before hitting the sack, only stopping for one last drink at a beachside bar where an Elvis impersonater was performing.’
      • ‘After his long 11-hour workday you'd think Lipani would hit the sack.’
      go to bed, retire, go to one's room, call it a day, go to sleep
      turn in, hit the hay
      View synonyms
  • hit the spot

    • Be exactly what is required.

      ‘the cup of coffee hit the spot’
      • ‘When it's good, it hits the spot in perfect fashion.’
      • ‘It certainly hit the spot with that target market, with a redemption rate of 33 per cent.’
      • ‘It's the pride and sense of achievement in that last line that hits the spot.’
      • ‘If you gradually cut back on added sugar you may even find that a peach or an apple hits the spot.’
      • ‘The rest is all pretty much in the same vein and hits the spot almost every time.’
      • ‘One of the conclusions hits the spot, but the others, while funny, are sitcom laughs.’
      • ‘This hit the spot for me and the mild cheese and spinach acted as a good foil to the punchy pesto and distinctive asparagus.’
      • ‘It hits the spot when I'm in the mood for a creamy, fruity, snack.’
      • ‘The occasional dish hit the spot, but for the most part the food was tired.’
      • ‘It was a little over-chilled, but hit the spot nonetheless.’
  • make a hit

    • Be successful or popular.

      ‘you made a big hit with her’
      • ‘The salad made a hit as usual, and the guacamole very much pleased all of us, including, surprisingly, him.’
      • ‘These spectacular flowers are real traffic stoppers and sure to make a hit in your garden.’
      • ‘There was a fancy party where Katherine got to use her corporate skills and Phil made a hit by playing the bohemian.’
      • ‘Since we are a new, small company we wanted to make a hit.’
      • ‘His credentials have great appeal among ACT voters, and the fact he has made a hit in the polls has also damaged ACT.’
      • ‘Another British car import makes a hit with performances that are off the charts.’
      • ‘Not now John, all you need is a grease covered white shirt to make a hit at your interview, he thought to himself.’
      • ‘But it is critical to a vehicle looking to make a hit by being more fashionable or trendy than its direct competitors.’
      • ‘‘Calvin Klein's shared fragrance made a hit, and many clothes with the same design are worn by both men and women,’ Kan said.’
      • ‘‘I was pleased we made a hit, even with people in the countryside,’ she said.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • hit on

    • 1Discover or think of, especially by chance.

      ‘she hit on a novel idea for fund-raising’
      • ‘Banks have hit upon a novel idea to woo existing and potential customers.’
      • ‘The Cigar Club of Ireland has also hit upon a novel form of protest.’
      • ‘Once you hit upon the perfect design you can race your creation against competitors from all over the world.’
      • ‘Substitute ‘fire’ for ‘water’ in Robbins' hypothesis and we may be hitting upon a parallel discovery.’
      • ‘They hit upon the idea of creating a rare type of red hair dye and offering it for sale in small quantities.’
      • ‘Three months after graduating, they hit London - and hit upon a novel way of getting themselves known.’
      • ‘One of the leading lubricant-manufacturing companies hit upon a novel idea to attract its customers.’
      • ‘To prove the point, upon his return Rory hit upon the idea of doing a programme for BBC Radio 4.’
      • ‘Whether it was by chance or design Sam Allardyce has hit upon the strike force he has craved all season.’
      • ‘He had hit upon one of the original graves and was too freaked out to go anywhere near the hole.’
      discover, come up with, think of, conceive of, dream up, work out, invent, create, originate, develop, devise, design, pioneer, uncover, contrive, realize
      stumble on, chance on, light on, come upon, blunder on, arrive at
      put one's finger on
      View synonyms
    • 2Make sexual advances toward.

      • ‘He unabashedly hits on women.’
      • ‘Well according to two sources on the set of American Idol, the real reason Mario was asked to leave was because he was hitting on the girls of the show.’
      • ‘You can tell your little jokes, then we'll all laugh as you get shot down hitting on the cute little bartender, Allie.’
      • ‘If I weren't already married, you just know I'd be hitting on at least two of them.’
      • ‘It doesn't help that he looks about ten years older than he is, but I can just picture him as the creepy guy in the bar hitting on younger women.’
      • ‘Introducing yourself to a woman you're hitting on is also considered basic good manners.’
      • ‘Forced to find another source of income, he hits on the idea of renting out a hut in the woods to courting couples.’
      • ‘The next time I saw Max, he was hitting on some girl with dyed green hair and a Partridge Family lunchbox.’
  • hit someone up

    • 1Ask someone for something, typically money.

      ‘he hit up some family members’
      ‘I have an employee who is always hitting me up for a raise’
      • ‘Lots of couples seem to pay for their own celebrations these days, or hit up both families.’
      • ‘If I'd known he was that soft a touch, I'd have hit him up for a couple hundred grand.’
      • ‘Most recently, she'd hit her parents up for $1,600 to fix her kids' teeth.’
      • ‘All of them will hit me up for money if given the chance.’
      • ‘Second, I've become paranoid that everyone I know who is short of cash will hit me up for a loan.’
      • ‘That was before he hit me up for 200 bucks and said he might sue me if I didn't give it to him.’
      • ‘Suddenly, they can have resources equal to an incumbent's without hitting up major donors.’
      • ‘Feel free to hit me up in the forums if you have any questions or comments.’
      • ‘Before I start I thought I'd hit up the most intelligent and well traveled readers on the web for some advice.’
      • ‘As soon as I heard about it, I started hitting up pals for pledges.’
      • ‘Juliette has a little boy who's maybe seven and my little girl is 21 months so I hit her up for whatever advice she could give to a new father.’
      1. 1.1[usually in imperative]Contact someone.
        ‘if you have a serious band and would like to play some music, hit me up’


Late Old English hittan (in the sense come upon, find), from Old Norse hitta come upon, meet with of unknown origin.