Definition of Hispanic in English:

Hispanic

adjective

  • 1Relating to Spain or to Spanish-speaking countries, especially those of Latin America.

    • ‘The specific role of family differs somewhat between Hispanic and African American cultures.’
    • ‘I would love to learn more about the Hispanic culture and people!’
    • ‘Then Alicia the Hispanic looking girl went second.’
    • ‘The project will provide hands-on training and artist mentorships targeted to highly motivated Hispanic teens.’
    • ‘Ruiz, originally of Puerto Rico, becomes the first Hispanic heavyweight champion with his unanimous decision over Holyfield.’
    • ‘There has been less class conflict in Honduras than in the other Hispanic Central American countries.’
    • ‘The residents of Miami used to look down on Hispanic food and culture, but now they can't get enough of it.’
    • ‘As a result, they have overlooked the unique characteristics and problems posed by contemporary Hispanic immigration.’
    • ‘The food is far more colourful - in fact, the photos on the menu look just like what you get: great heaping platters of Hispanic favourites.’
    • ‘What he saw on the British-controlled island would shape his dedication to social justice and start a life-long affection for Hispanic people.’
    • ‘Welchert recalls that early meeting with Hispanic leaders.’
    • ‘Total system-wide black and Hispanic admissions are up significantly, exactly what UC wanted.’
    • ‘There is quite a large Hispanic population here.’
    • ‘This plus his job was the sum total real-life experience he'd had with Hispanic culture.’
    • ‘Many immigrants moved either back to Spain or to another Hispanic country.’
    • ‘We've seen things from Vanuatu, the Hispanic crosses in South America.’
    • ‘Bonilla is Hispanic, and gets substantial Hispanic support.’
    • ‘This charming story about land rights, written by a Caucasian man, is told from the viewpoint of indigenous and Hispanic people.’
    • ‘For the Hispanic community the Spanish language is the language of prayer and of communion with God.’
    1. 1.1Relating to Spanish-speaking people or their culture, especially in the US.
      • ‘The influx of Cubans into Florida beginning in 1960 turned the Miami-Dade County area into a centre of Hispanic language and culture.’
      • ‘These children are on their way to two weeks of summer camp, but for many parents in this heavily Hispanic neighborhood that is a frightful thought.’
      • ‘The Hispanic community in Denver didn't ignore Issel's response, and Issel was forced to resign.’
      • ‘In addition, about 40 percent of the Hispanic population in America reported they do not speak English well.’
      • ‘This administration is committed to ensuring that Hispanic workers are safe on the job and fully and fairly compensated for their work.’
      • ‘I was to play Pablo, the Hispanic friend at the poker party.’
      • ‘If this plan is approved, principals and schools with the majority of Hispanic students would have three years to learn Spanish.’
      • ‘Asian and Hispanic communities grew in California and New York.’
      • ‘We're talking about focusing on the Hispanic community as a whole.’
      • ‘While a smaller component, immigrants from Spain also are considered part of the Hispanic demographic group in this country.’
      • ‘After all, the ethnic composition of the areas served by the clubs is heavily Hispanic, and summer camp is not part of the Hispanic culture.’
      • ‘I saw your poll earlier said that only 10 percent of the Hispanic community is concerned about immigration.’
      • ‘We're a battleground state with a large Hispanic population.’
      • ‘Gonzales said media surveys are not well-designed for measuring Hispanic voting patterns.’
      • ‘Alleged Hispanic resistance to learning English is one of Huntington's central claims.’
      • ‘In the event, the segregated Hispanic community of Tucson was conspicuous by its under-representation.’
      • ‘And by the way, those are Hispanic citizens as well as white citizens.’
      • ‘Recently, it launched a monthly section called Tempo that niftily reports on Hispanic culture in the city.’
      • ‘While the Hispanic population in Calgary is still less than 20,000 people, the festival is a huge draw for Calgarians from all backgrounds.’
      • ‘By whatever name, the Hispanic community is beginning to make itself felt - politically and economically.’

noun

  • A Spanish-speaking person living in the US, especially one of Latin American descent.

    • ‘Twice as many Hispanics as European American students feel very comfortable.’
    • ‘For all anyone knows it could work equally well in Asians or Caucasians or Hispanics.’
    • ‘Other Hispanics complain about a lack of good Latino comedies in English.’
    • ‘Riley says that few of those students are Hispanics or African Americans and he wants to see the numbers doubled.’
    • ‘African Americans and Hispanics shared the belief that education would help reduce the stigma.’
    • ‘Family intactness was a significant factor only for whites and Hispanics.’
    • ‘When I made my career choice, I knew I wanted to reach out to under-represented groups, especially Hispanics.’
    • ‘Some of these are in immigrant gateway states, with growing numbers of Hispanics and Asians.’
    • ‘In the United States, among Hispanics, Mexican Americans have the lowest rate of asthma.’
    • ‘Of the Hispanics in the district, 59 percent reported they speak only Spanish in the home.’
    • ‘Well, we're seeing how Hispanics are really integrating into American society.’
    • ‘This time it was for the influx of Hasidic Jews, Hispanics, and some twenty other ethnic groups.’
    • ‘According to these standards, Hispanics or Latinos are referred to as an ethnic group.’
    • ‘That's because there just weren't that many Hispanics playing in the majors.’
    • ‘This means that projections and, therefore birth rates, are not very reliable for Hispanics.’
    • ‘While not universal, some operators are pursuing Hispanics with targeted initiatives.’
    • ‘There is some directed diffusion of Hispanics and Asians outward from these immigrant ports of entry.’
    • ‘The same trend is evident among Hispanics at more selective universities, the commission said.’
    • ‘While most white men backed him, majorities of women, African-Americans and Hispanics did not.’
    • ‘And where we spent the resources and we talked to Hispanics, we picked up the Hispanic vote.’

Usage

In US English, Hispanic is the standard accepted term when referring to Spanish-speaking people living in the US. Other, more specific, terms such as Latino (for people of Latin American descent) and Chicano (for those of Mexican descent) are also used where occasion demands. With these words of Spanish origin, the feminine forms Latina and Chicana should be used when referring to women or girls. The masculine forms (with -o) are used when referring to both sexes together, or to men or boys. See also Chicano

Origin

From Latin Hispanicus, from Hispania Spain.

Pronunciation:

Hispanic

/hiˈspanik/