Definition of high in English:

high

adjective

  • 1Of great vertical extent.

    ‘the top of a high mountain’
    ‘the mast was higher than the tallest building in the city’
    • ‘They are planning to install high fences and replace the smashed windows, which have been boarded up.’
    • ‘It's the one thing that will keep you going when that mountain seems just too high to climb.’
    • ‘Although the new policy is a little late for the downtown area, which is already over-crowded with high buildings, there is still a lot the city can do to improve the situation.’
    • ‘The conditions in the high mountains were hard and four of our group turned back.’
    • ‘Sherpas, well known as mountain guides and porters, live in the high mountains of E. Nepal.’
    • ‘In the centre of the 10 km deep crater is a mountain almost as high as Mount Everest.’
    • ‘It was a place untouched by man, for the mountain was far too high, and far too treacherous.’
    • ‘He said policing the gardens was difficult as they were secluded and surrounded by a high hedge and fence.’
    • ‘It is a country dominated by high peaks and wide flat stretches of lava field, powerful waterfalls and creaking glaciers.’
    • ‘The open area is secured by high boarding and is used for car parking.’
    • ‘Climbing and trekking are obvious income sources for countries endowed with high mountain ranges.’
    • ‘To the south there are high mountains, covered in thick spring snow.’
    • ‘Watch the skies if you happen to be walking near any high buildings.’
    • ‘Alice Springs is surrounded by high black mountains, similar to the mountains of Mecca.’
    • ‘Crystal clear streams flow down from the high mountains into the Datong River.’
    • ‘Climatic effects are accentuated on the high elevations of these mountain ranges.’
    • ‘Old rocks predominate and high hills and mountains are more common.’
    • ‘The terraced waterfalls are picturesque against the backdrop of high, green mountains.’
    • ‘In the high mountains, where there are large falls of snow, there can also be avalanches.’
    • ‘Veteran climbers bemoan the increasing commercialisation of high peaks such as Everest and K2.’
    tall, lofty, towering, soaring, elevated, giant, big
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    1. 1.1 (after a measurement and in questions) measuring a specified distance from top to bottom.
      ‘a tree forty feet high’
      ‘how high is the fence?’
      • ‘The land rises abruptly to highland ridges with mountain summits as high as 3000 feet.’
      • ‘The fox cleared a six-foot high fence to get among the chickens and would have killed them all had it not been disturbed.’
      • ‘Police closed the promenade in Blackpool to motorists as waves dozens of feet high pounded the seafront.’
      • ‘Deep in the heart of Central India there is a wild forest surrounded by sheer 1,200 feet high cliffs.’
      • ‘Her tomato plants are more than four feet high and have given us a constant supply of tomatoes all summer.’
      • ‘In the middle of the field there was a square-shaped, flat-roofed building, about eight feet high.’
      • ‘The two-and-a-half tonne boat was lowered down a sheer cliff 200 ft high.’
      • ‘The alley was a dead end; the granite wall at the end was at least twelve feet high.’
      • ‘The structure was mounted between two walls, each 70 feet long and 50 feet high.’
      • ‘North Ossetian president Alexander Dzasokhov said the glacier was 150m high.’
      • ‘The project aims to build 165 wind turbines, 400 feet high, in the hills above Tregaron.’
      • ‘On the west side of the rock is a vertical wall about 8m high, covered in white and orange anemones.’
      • ‘It is only dangerous if you attempt to climb up on to the wall, which he seems to forget is about five feet high!’
      • ‘‘How high is it?’ asked Holmes. ‘It is just over a metre high.’’
      • ‘The tide was in, and the breakers were a good twenty to thirty feet high when they hit the harbour wall.’
      • ‘They say the company's proposal to build a 7m high building on the site, which backs on to a number of homes in Gilhams Avenue, is unnecessary and intrusive.’
      • ‘The New Year's Day wave passed just under the 30-metre high platform of the North Alwyn rig.’
      • ‘Its ceilings are barely five feet high, because the only people who worked there were child labourers.’
      • ‘He was not able to stand up in the space, which was about three feet six inches high.’
      • ‘Because of the extreme snow that had hit the region this winter, the snow was five feet high.’
    2. 1.2 Far above ground, sea level, or another point of reference.
      ‘a fortress high up on a hill’
      • ‘Remember that the overland trip will help you acclimatize to the high altitude.’
      • ‘It's another gorgeous day. There were some high cirrus clouds earlier and it looks like they're coming back, but, for the most part, it's just been beautiful.’
      • ‘Inland, a high central plateau drops eastward towards the vegetated dunes of the Kalahari Desert.’
      • ‘Because of its high altitude, it is typically one of the first Scottish roads to be closed during bad winter weather.’
      • ‘Most sports utility vehicles are so high off the ground that your dog has to be virtually airborne or a St Bernard to be able to climb in.’
      • ‘Filming at high altitude in the Peruvian Andes wasn't always much fun.’
      • ‘You enter a long narrow main room with a shimmering disco ball hanging from a high ceiling.’
      • ‘In common with the living room, the dining area has a high ceiling and a fireplace.’
      • ‘This area has a wonderfully high ceiling and gets plenty of natural light through a large window and patio doors.’
      • ‘The window was much too high up for her to reach, but unlike the one in the bathroom, it was large enough for her to squeeze through.’
      • ‘Ben knew Joe had a fear of heights, and the ledge was high off the ground.’
      • ‘To the left of the reception hall is the drawing room with an attractive period fireplace, original wooden floors, high ceilings and large windows.’
      • ‘It's more likely to occur if you're exercising in hot weather or at a high altitude.’
      • ‘The speakers will be installed throughout the station in inaccessible or high areas to stop them being vandalised.’
      • ‘At high altitudes, the thin air makes it hard to breathe unless the cabin is pressurized.’
      • ‘I didn't get a hint of back-ache from the driving seat, or from pulling gear in and out of the high luggage area.’
      • ‘Rare species of bird inhabit the higher branches of the trees.’
      • ‘Few people have ever survived such a serious injury at such high altitude.’
      • ‘Alpine plants are those that are naturally found in high altitudes.’
      • ‘The plant is easy to propagate, and tolerates poor soil, high altitudes, and harsh climates.’
      in the air, in the sky, high up, up, up above, on high, overhead, above
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    3. 1.3 Extending above the normal or average level.
      ‘a round face with a high forehead’
      • ‘He had dark red hair and rather elven looking features - high cheekbones, sharp chin.’
      • ‘Beads of sweat formed on his high forehead.’
      • ‘Crossing his legs in front of him, he leans back against the high pillows and closes his eyes.’
      • ‘Once in bog at the bottom of the coulee, one can see that the high grass is covered with grey silt.’
      • ‘The grass right now is thick and high, but there are rumours it's going to be cut down.’
      • ‘Dark curls, cropped close to his skull, give way to a high forehead and a strong jaw.’
      • ‘She's either not made up or has applied very subtle cosmetics to her high forehead and cute snub nose.’
      • ‘Possessing a high forehead and pale skin was the most important factor of Renaissance beauty.’
      • ‘There's the bold, aquiline nose, to be sure; the high, intelligent forehead and strong chin.’
      • ‘His hair was receding at the front and he had a high forehead.’
      • ‘She wore her hair in a high bun and even applied a little kohl around her eyes and some red rouge on her cheeks and lips.’
      • ‘Michelle says that really I should have a fringe because I have a high forehead.’
      • ‘He was more curious about the decorated headband crowning the man's high forehead.’
      • ‘Her broad flat forehead and high cheekbones catch the light from the windows behind them.’
      • ‘The forehead is high and serious, and the hair, which one feels to be fine and thick and fair, drawn off it and lying close like a cap.’
      • ‘In most patients with a high forehead, or in males with a receding hairline, the incision is placed at the frontal hairline.’
      • ‘Councillors in Melksham have backed a hairdresser's call for action over a dangerous high pavement in the town.’
      • ‘Elsie was a petite woman with thick waves of dark hair and a high forehead.’
      • ‘Light brown hair was brushed back from a high forehead except for a few locks which fell forward.’
      • ‘The face is pale and perhaps slightly unearthly, with a high forehead sharply defined against red-gold hair.’
    4. 1.4attributive (of territory or landscape) inland and well above sea level.
      ‘high prairies’
      • ‘The traditional territory contains a diversity of landscapes with rugged mountains and numerous valleys and high prairies.’
      • ‘This species ranged the high grasslands of western North America from Alaska to Mexico, while a lighter-built species (Arctodus pristinus) with smaller teeth inhabited the more heavily wooded Atlantic coastal region.’
    5. 1.5attributive Performed at, to, or from a considerable height.
      ‘high diving’
      • ‘In terms of risk, this is on a par with high diving into a piranha pool.’
      • ‘The leaps and jumps were high and spectacular to watch, yet the dancers made it appear effortless.’
      • ‘Southall was finally booked for his second late and high lunge on the Norwegian Riise inside five minutes.’
      • ‘Born in Thirsk in 192, he excelled early in a variety of sports, and became a champion in boxing, high diving, and pole vaulting.’
    6. 1.6 (of latitude) close to 90°; near the North or South Pole.
      ‘high southern latitudes’
      • ‘It is found in the recently glaciated areas of the Northern hemisphere and high latitudes in the Southern hemisphere.’
      • ‘The theory says the high latitudes should warm up more than the lower latitudes.’
      • ‘Lack of sun in the later part of the day is why winter is so famously bleak at high latitudes.’
      • ‘They also occur more often in the winter and in the middle to high latitudes rather than near to the equator.’
      • ‘These then flow from the high latitudes, circulating cool water throughout the world's ocean basins.’
    7. 1.7 (of a pitched ball) above a certain level, such as the batter's armpits, as it crosses home plate, and thus outside the strike zone.
      • ‘Opponents try to tempt him with high fastballs out of the zone and breaking balls down and away.’
      • ‘Jim Edmonds of the Cardinals led off the top of the ninth inning with a high fly down the left field line.’
      • ‘In a year or two, he was able to hit the high fastball or at least take the pitch.’
      • ‘De los Santos uses a high fastball as his out pitch and has an average slider and splitter.’
      • ‘He's focusing on balance to avoid lunging for high pitches out of the strike zone.’
  • 2Great, or greater than normal, in quantity, size, or intensity.

    ‘a high temperature’
    ‘fudge is high in calories’
    • ‘Ten of those caught face a court appearance, mostly because they were clocked doing excessively high speeds.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, melt the remaining butter and the oil in a frying pan, add the mushrooms and fry over a high heat until golden brown.’
    • ‘This often means they pay workers low wages and charge customers high prices.’
    • ‘Educational standards in the area are high, particularly among younger people.’
    • ‘My personal opinion on the speed limits of this country is that they are too high for residential areas.’
    • ‘The normal purpose of any cartel is to keep prices high by controlling supply and demand.’
    • ‘The firm says demand for industrial property from purchasers in the West Yorkshire area is high.’
    • ‘Chickpeas are exceptionally high in protein and very low in fat, making them an ideal food.’
    • ‘Many of us eat to excess and eat too many foods with a high sugar content.’
    • ‘As a result, many people may find they are actually over-insured and paying unnecessarily high premiums.’
    • ‘Waves on Puget Sound were so high that day that only four crew members could row.’
    • ‘He said the area had a high percentage of children under four, and many parents were without family support.’
    • ‘He added that staff would be asked to work extra hours to cope with the high volume of business during the festive period.’
    • ‘Cashews are high in protein and carbohydrate as well as being rich in vitamin A.’
    • ‘Although he was earning a relatively high salary, he found the job extremely stressful.’
    • ‘This area has high unemployment, and mortality is above the national average.’
    • ‘Staff are also expressing concerns over job security, high workloads and excessive hours.’
    • ‘The chilly weather and high wind affected his performance, according to Zhang.’
    • ‘This three-bedroom period house has been extended and renovated to a very high standard.’
    • ‘But one of the factors that made cancer treatment expensive was the high cost of the drugs.’
    inflated, excessive, unreasonable, overpriced, sky-high, unduly expensive, dear, costly, top, exorbitant, extortionate, outrageous, prohibitive
    strong, powerful, violent, intense, extreme, forceful, sharp, stiff
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    1. 2.1 Of large numerical or monetary value.
      ‘they had been playing for high stakes’
      • ‘You are 65, but you played for high stakes over several years, and eventually you lost.’
      • ‘The only difference is the stakes are significantly higher.’
      • ‘It seems to me that many in the U.S. don't quite appreciate how high the stakes are.’
      • ‘But poker is most interesting when the stakes are high and small fortunes rest on the draw of a card.’
      • ‘The first deal is decided between two opponents who each cut the cards - whoever cuts the higher card has the slight advantage of dealing first.’
      • ‘It was one of the most daring missions of the Second World War - and the stakes had never been higher.’
    2. 2.2 Very favorable.
      ‘nature had provided him with an admirably high opinion of himself’
      • ‘People had held her in high esteem fancying that her withdrawal from public life was a sort of silent homage to her martyred husband.’
      • ‘I have, as you know, an extremely high regard for the men and women in the Australian Defence Force.’
      • ‘We cannot have too low an opinion of ourselves or too high an opinion of Christ.’
      • ‘I am delighted he has been so impressed by our care and has such a high opinion of our staff.’
      • ‘The media baron has always had a high opinion of himself and a low one of many others.’
      • ‘Mr Blass is looking forward to the operation being fully up and running in Sligo, an area he holds in high esteem.’
      • ‘The selectors have got a high opinion of Justin Marshall as a person and as a player.’
      • ‘He does not hold the pastor in high regard and often considers his homilies burdensome.’
      • ‘It did not take long for the cricketing community to realise why Cronje was admired and held in high esteem.’
      • ‘I don't mind you talking about me to your friends, but it doesn't seem any of them have a very high opinion of me. maybe rightly.’
      • ‘Hearing it again after years only confirmed my high opinion of the score.’
      • ‘I hold you in very high esteem, and have held you in very high esteem throughout that period.’
      • ‘The fact that Britain's No 2 has a ferocious serve and a high opinion of his own abilities only makes matters worse.’
      • ‘If you are in Government you appoint people whom you can work with, and whom you have a high opinion of.’
      • ‘but, in common with other members of the family, he had a very high opinion of himself.’
      • ‘Self-esteem means having a high opinion of ourselves regardless of what we may or may not have done to earn it.’
      • ‘Many people close to the club have a high opinion of him and we are quickly finding out why.’
      • ‘The police are not held in high regard in some areas and their self-esteem and image have been damaged.’
      • ‘You have always said you wanted to work with Sean Penn, because you had a very high opinion of him.’
      • ‘Like many people he doesn't have a very high opinion of them claiming that they were put on this planet to make solicitors look good!’
      favourable, good, positive, approving, admiring, complimentary, commendatory, appreciative, flattering, glowing, adulatory, approbatory, rapturous, full of praise
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    3. 2.3 Extreme in religious or political views.
      ‘the high Christology of the Christian creeds’
      • ‘The most striking characteristic of this political approach is the author's patent partiality and clear adherence to high Tory principles.’
      • ‘Christina, like her mother and sister Maria, was a devout High Anglican, much influenced by the Tractarians.’
    4. 2.4 (of a period or movement) at its peak.
      ‘high summer’
      • ‘The human body was the main preoccupation of High Renaissance artists and they often depicted it nude.’
      • ‘You can spot all these features from your cliff path when the water is clear during high summer.’
      • ‘The low winter sun is much more favourable for good photography than high summer brilliance.’
      • ‘Don't go to Spain in high summer as it becomes very hot, especially away from coastal breezes.’
      • ‘In the blistering heat of high summer, it is literally too hot for study and so youngsters get a couple of months off.’
      • ‘It gets so crowded here in high summer that there's often no room to sit down, let alone lay out a towel.’
      • ‘The air had been washed down, sweeping away the usual mist that hangs over the Greek Islands in high summer.’
      • ‘The work is considered a masterpiece in the use of perspective and in the portrayal of the artistic ideals of the High Renaissance.’
      • ‘If succulent plants are kept out in the high summer months then they get affected.’
      • ‘The existing public lavatory is used by 600 people a day in high summer.’
      • ‘It was high summer, and the grass shone green even as the powerful winds caused it to ripple and shimmer.’
      • ‘It was high summer when I was there and as the days rolled on and flawless blue sky followed flawless blue sky, it began to get a little boring.’
      • ‘This is one of the best spots in the country, but it's cold even in high summer.’
      • ‘The leaves had lost the fresh green of early summer and taken on the darker bronzy tinge of high summer.’
      • ‘Spain's Balearic islands are now among the in places to see and be seen in high summer.’
      • ‘It seems like only a fortnight ago it was high summer - hot sweaty summer - but now all of a sudden it's autumn.’
      • ‘Moving into high summer, there are literally dozens of plants to choose from.’
      • ‘This is Yorkshire in high summer, so it's pouring with rain this morning.’
      • ‘The passionate retelling of Shakespeare's tragic story is set in the Italian city of Verona during high summer.’
      • ‘As it progresses the music evokes images of South Sea islands in balmy high summer.’
  • 3Great in rank, status, or importance.

    ‘financial security is high on your list of priorities’
    ‘he held high office in professional organizations’
    • ‘He said this situation had put the issue of imports very high on the agenda.’
    • ‘He stressed that other high positions in the organisation are filled by those committed to conservation.’
    • ‘We have many women in high positions in the Church especially working in parishes.’
    • ‘Finding a permanent home for the campus is high on the university's agenda.’
    • ‘Road traffic accident reduction is a high priority for North Yorkshire firefighters and our partners.’
    • ‘Press conferences are usually reserved for those higher in the chain of command.’
    • ‘Lydon has much to offer, but Woodward elevated him to high office incredibly early in his coaching career.’
    • ‘None of his are thought through, a dangerous fault for someone so high in Government.’
    • ‘For someone in such a high position to dismiss and discount this argument is really worrying.’
    • ‘Respect for the preservation of the environment was high on his sense of priorities.’
    • ‘Robert Altman has definitely made better films, but this one must rank high on the list.’
    • ‘Politics is much more of a closed shop in Britain and Australia than it is in the US. You have to have go through a certain lengthy career path in the party and parliament before standing for any high office.’
    • ‘He also achieved a high position in the Academy at Geneva, becoming its rector.’
    • ‘Arthur Balfour unexpectedly rewarded him by appointing him Chancellor of the Exchequer, a higher office than he had ever received under the Liberals or the Lloyd George coalition.’
    • ‘The escalating problem of unruly, yobbish behaviour is now high on the agenda for politicians of all persuasions.’
    • ‘What is it like for a woman in Taiwan to rise to such a high position, and what challenges have you faced?’
    • ‘At that point in time, the impending smoking ban and the effect it would have on drink sales were high on the agenda.’
    • ‘In addition to housing and employment, education and tackling crime are also high on their agenda.’
    • ‘Getting water is high on everyone's list of priorities and takes up a good part of a resident's time.’
    • ‘Frank just happened to have a family member who had a high position in Microsoft.’
    high-ranking, high-level, leading, top, top-level, prominent, eminent, pre-eminent, foremost, senior, influential, distinguished, powerful, important, elevated, notable, principal, prime, premier, chief, main, upper, ruling, exalted, illustrious
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    1. 3.1 Ranking above others of the same kind.
      ‘they announced the High Commissioner's retirement’
      • ‘Brian Ború was crowned King of Munster here in 977 and he became High King of Ireland in 1002.’
      • ‘The site was considered the capital of Ireland, when it became the seat of the High King, who would rule the dozens of kingdoms that had emerged across the country.’
    2. 3.2 Morally or culturally superior.
      ‘they believed that nature was driven by something higher than mere selfishness’
      • ‘While he argues that the opposition of high and low art is wrong, he does so only because he doesn't know what high art is in the first place.’
      • ‘It would have been the kiss of death for his career - but if he really was motivated by high principles then at least he would know he had done the right thing.’
      • ‘Chapter 7 looks at the part that the Bible has played in high and popular culture.’
      • ‘The auteur's true genius lies in his ability to combine high art with popular culture.’
      • ‘Ernest's father, a man of high ideals, was very strict and censored the books he allowed his children to read.’
      • ‘Popular taste is a good guide to the temper of the times, much more so than highbrow high culture.’
      • ‘Once realized, this consciousness leads to an awareness of something higher than physical needs, emotional desires, and survival demands dictated by hormones or organs.’
      • ‘The new Millennium wing at the National Gallery represents the marriage of high ideals and fine art.’
      • ‘During this period the gap between most forms of high culture and popular culture remained wide.’
      • ‘It may not have been high art, but for sheer singalong spectacle and professionalism it was unbeatable.’
      • ‘The classics had a profound presence not only in the high culture, but in the inner lives of educated persons.’
      • ‘The Czechs are nothing if not talented musicians with a deep love of fine culture and high art.’
      • ‘Her films and writings establish an exchange between high and popular culture, art and commerce.’
      • ‘Persian was the court language and the language of literature and of high culture.’
      • ‘This was a right old mish-mash of high art and low culture, sport and theatre.’
      • ‘One final relevant feature of postmodernity is its mixture of popular and high culture.’
      • ‘What his parents lacked in high culture, they made up for in political principles.’
      • ‘Lisa and I are off for an afternoon of high culture at the theatre.’
      • ‘An occasional snobbery still persists - theatre is the high art, film its lesser cousin.’
      • ‘Literature was no exception, and Shakespeare was eagerly received as the epitome of high culture.’
      high-minded, noble-minded, lofty, moral, ethical, honourable, admirable, upright, principled, honest, virtuous, righteous
      excellent, outstanding, exemplary, exceptional, admirable, fine, great, good, very good, first-class, first-rate, superior, superlative, superb, commendable, laudable, praiseworthy, meritorious, blameless, faultless, flawless, impeccable, irreproachable, unimpeachable, perfect, unequalled, unparalleled
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  • 4(of a sound or note) having a frequency at the upper end of the auditory range.

    ‘a high, squeaky voice’
    • ‘The intro was played softly and her voice was high and sweet, singing the melody.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, the stillness of the air was torn by the loud, shrill sound of a klaxon wailing at high pitch.’
    • ‘The sound of the drill is high and shrill and shatters the silence in my room.’
    • ‘She has this really high shrill voice that makes me cringe every time she speaks.’
    • ‘As they cross into his yard, their voices fade to a dull murmur punctuated by high laughter.’
    • ‘Her voice was high and almost childish as she gave the man a playful swat on the arm.’
    • ‘A high whining sound came from the other end, and he held the phone away from his ear, rolling his eyes and grimacing.’
    • ‘Did you know that as human ears age, they lose the ability to pick up high pitches?’
    • ‘Her voice could reach such a high pitch, that it could actually cause a dog to lose its sanity.’
    • ‘A high sing-song voice rang from the kitchen and a woman appeared.’
    • ‘The best singers started their song at a low pitch to suit the range with which their voices are able to cope, and did not try songs which required them to reach high notes.’
    • ‘‘You're hurt,’ she said in her high childish voice.’
    high-pitched, high-frequency, soprano, treble, falsetto, shrill, acute, sharp, piping, piercing, penetrating
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    1. 4.1 (of a singer or instrument) producing notes of relatively high pitch.
      ‘a high soprano voice’
      • ‘His energy in concert was quite inspiring, each song found him stomping about the stage, singing in a high tenor with sparse instrumentation provided by an acoustic guitar.’
      • ‘He wrote several so-called ‘concert’ arias, tailor-made for Aloysia's astonishing high soprano.’
      • ‘The G clef is used for the upper staff of keyboard music, the soprano voice, and the high instruments (e.g. violin or flute).’
      • ‘The cadenzas break down the quintet into low strings (cello and viola), high strings (the two violins), and piano.’
  • 5informal predicative Feeling euphoric, especially from the effects of drugs or alcohol.

    ‘some of them were already high on alcohol and Ecstasy’
    ‘he was high on an idea’
    • ‘During some of these incidents he admitted to being high on heroin and cocaine.’
    • ‘It was 2001 when Joe was physically attacked by a passenger he believes was high on drugs.’
    • ‘He is fat, lazy, moody, gluttonous, horny and pretty much constantly drunk or high on hashish.’
    • ‘This wasn't the boy who seemed to be high on opium every time I met him.’
    • ‘During the three-week trial the jury heard Giles, 19, was high on drink and drugs at the time of the attack.’
    • ‘He admitted that he had no idea what he was doing on the day of the murders because he was so high on drugs.’
    • ‘They were pursuing a mirage of infinite wealth in private aeroplanes, high on champagne and designer drugs.’
    • ‘It was also alleged he rang Miss A in the early hours telling her he was high on cocaine and that he wanted to perform a sex act with her.’
    • ‘This witness also admitted to being high on crack cocaine, marijuana and beer the night of the killing.’
    • ‘I could tell that she had slept hardly at all during the day, she was probably still high from the night before.’
    • ‘The defence lawyer noted that he was high on crack cocaine at the time of the stabbing.’
    • ‘Once again a boorish minority, high on drugs or drink, is to blame.’
    • ‘He used to come home high on marijuana and my little sisters were seeing him like that, so I have seen what drugs can lead to.’
    • ‘In fact, as the hours wore on, I found I was feeling charged and a little high with all the chocolate.’
    • ‘Maybe I am still high from all the joints I smoked earlier this evening.’
    intoxicated, inebriated, on drugs, drugged, stupefied, befuddled, delirious, hallucinating
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    1. 5.1 Intoxicated with drugs.
  • 6predicative Unpleasantly strong-smelling, in particular (of food) beginning to go bad.

    • ‘The cheese was rather high, and tended to crumble when we opened the tin, but it was quite edible.’
    gamy, smelly, strong-smelling
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    1. 6.1 (of game) slightly decomposed and so ready to cook.
      • ‘Mine are hung for no more than 2 or 3 days especially over the last few years what with the milder winters. Its a question of taste and how high you like your bird.’
      • ‘The meat was quite high with complex strong flavours, which is just the way I like it.’
      gamy, smelly, strong-smelling
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  • 7Phonetics
    (of a vowel) produced with the tongue relatively near the palate.

    • ‘New York pronunciation has a long, tense, very round vowel in words like caught, and a long, tense, relatively high vowel in words such as cab.’
    • ‘The symbol ‘i’ in IPA (as in most orthographies) denotes a high front vowel.’

noun

  • 1A high point, level, or figure.

    ‘commodity prices were at a rare high’
    • ‘The bureau said Monday was the hottest day of the year so far, with a record high of 37.8?’
    • ‘Everyone knows about oil, but wholesale coal prices rose by 40% last year and metal prices, from copper to platinum, still regularly hit new highs.’
    • ‘The banks' gloomy predictions come after the FTSE100 reached new highs in 2003 and its highest level since August 2002.’
    • ‘The IPCC have said that the level of other greenhouse gases is also at an all time high.’
    • ‘Records tumbled across Yorkshire yesterday as schools and colleges in the region saw A-level scores hit new highs.’
    • ‘Gasoline prices continue to hit record highs and AAA says the national average for a gallon of self-serve regular now is $2.41.’
    • ‘The jobless figures rose in every state except Western Australia, reaching highs of 9 percent in Queensland and 9.2 percent in Tasmania.’
    • ‘In Finland, sea levels reached record highs, cutting off several coastal roads, but no major damage was reported.’
    • ‘Temperatures averaged almost 10 degrees above normal with highs reaching the low-to-mid nineties.’
    • ‘Similarly, by early January, the tech stocks that had led the Nasdaq to record levels had plummeted 35 percent from their December highs.’
    • ‘However, with borrowing and debt levels at record highs, buoyancy in these areas could still crumble rapidly if the general view of the economy changes for the worse.’
    • ‘This is a big worry, because mortgage debt and consumer credit figures keep hitting new highs every month.’
    • ‘With the summer heat hitting new highs and the air conditioner not functioning due to power restrictions, I decided that we would take a little expedition to the zoo.’
    • ‘In 2002, unemployment levels reached historic highs of 23 percent, real wages plummeted and the peso was severely devalued.’
    • ‘Equally, the proportion undertaking further study is at a record high.’
    • ‘With gasoline hitting new highs, motorists have been doing plenty of grousing at the pumps.’
    • ‘However, economists believe the euro will continue to reach new highs against both the dollar and sterling in the coming months.’
    • ‘But over the week the Japanese yen leapt to new three-year highs of around Y110.90 against the dollar, signalling that policy may indeed have changed after all.’
    • ‘Jiangxi Province in East China has been hot since the beginning of July, with highs over 37 degrees Celsius almost every day.’
    • ‘Coogan's comments follow the publication of figures last week which showed that mortgage lending and levels of personal debt had reached all-time highs.’
    high level, high point, record level, peak, record, high water mark
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A high-frequency sound or musical note.
      • ‘Quite frankly I was pretty surprised that it sounded pretty good in both music and DVD's, with nice highs even without a single tweeter.’
      • ‘I wanted to use something with plenty of highs and lows, and good use of bass.’
      • ‘Children are particularly sensitive to highs and lows, as well as pitch duration.’
      • ‘Despite the electronics, the music is rather flat and uniform, lacking highs, lows and climaxes.’
      • ‘From the mellow, dark low register to brilliant instrumental highs, his sound is beautiful - like musical crystal.’
      • ‘She improvised the notes, the highs and lows but still stuck to the original song.’
      • ‘The Scandinavian sound tends to be clean and full, with aching highs and a harmony that carries in both channels of stereo in a unique way.’
      • ‘Excellent move, because the iRiver's audio quality remains one of the best on the market, with eardrum-busting bass notes or ethereal highs.’
      • ‘The Harman / Kardon speakers produce deep, luscious bass and clear, crisp singing highs.’
      • ‘Like other Bose speaker products, its sound is huge, with tight, crispy highs and deep clean lows.’
    2. 1.2 A high power setting.
      ‘the vent blower was on high’
      • ‘If you are griddling, preheat your ridged grill pan on high for five minutes.’
      • ‘Put the element on high until the water in the bottom pot is boiling, then turn down to medium.’
      • ‘When the rice is cooked, microwave the cabbage on high for two to three minutes or until soft.’
      • ‘I lie in bed, clad in shorts and a tank top, with the fan on high and all the windows open.’
      • ‘A similar phenomenon occurs when you have a heater set on high in an overheated room with all the windows and doors closed.’
    3. 1.3 An area of high atmospheric pressure; an anticyclone.
      • ‘These intermittent highs effectively separate the northwestern trough from the deep-water regions of the Hatton-Rockall and Iceland Basins to the west.’
      • ‘The high may move northward to cover Scotland or stay stuck just south of the UK.’
      • ‘In the southern hemisphere it is the meeting place of the dry east to southeast winds generated by the subtropical highs, and the moisture-laden northwesterly monsoon winds.’
    4. 1.4 Top gear in a motor vehicle.
      • ‘While Sullivan hasn't reached Mikita and Savard's heights, he has recorded career highs in goals and points in this, his second season with the Hawks.’
  • 2A notably happy or successful moment.

    ‘the highs and lows of life’
    • ‘No candidate is more emotionally prepared for the exhilarating highs and debilitating lows of a presidential marathon.’
    • ‘John will talk about his own background and experience, sharing the highs and lows of running a successful business.’
    • ‘It's important to remember that we all experience highs and lows in our fitness programs; it's how you deal with them that matters most.’
    • ‘The crash was one of the lows in a career that has had many highs, notably winning the World Under-21 title in 1993.’
    • ‘As well as the highs, Sheerin has experienced enough of life's lows to ensure he appreciates all that comes his way.’
    • ‘Most of these players had never experienced emotional highs and lows of such a magnitude in such a close time period.’
    • ‘He believed that without lows you couldn't experience highs, and that by getting through our problems together, our relationship was strengthened.’
    • ‘From his days as an amateur with the late Gordon Richards in the early 1970s, O'Neill has experienced dramatic highs and lows.’
    • ‘It was a time of occasional highs and many lows - court appearances, television interviews, press conferences, parliamentary lobbies.’
    • ‘Jacklin's life has been a roller-coaster of emotions, full of highs and lows.’
    • ‘In more than a quarter of a century of training, Luca Cumani has enjoyed many highs, including success in two Epsom Derbys, but also his fair share of lows.’
    • ‘Like many players, I've experienced the highs and lows which go hand-in-hand with having a career in professional football.’
    • ‘Married in 1949 to a very successful businessman in India, she has experienced many highs and lows in her life.’
    • ‘She knows more about racing's highs and lows than anyone, having overcome all manner of hurdles to establish herself at the top of the sport.’
    • ‘All in all, then, a talented performer with some notable career highs.’
    • ‘From the depths of despair to the ecstatic highs, the Olympics coverage on the BBC has provided us with a roller coaster of emotions bringing out the best in live television over the last couple of weeks.’
    • ‘The awards give students the opportunity to experience the emotional highs and lows and the practicalities of a live performance.’
    • ‘The controversial 27-year-old has suffered an all too familiar emotional rollercoaster ride of highs and lows.’
    • ‘Three years of touring around America and experiencing the highs and lows of the rock 'n' roll lifestyle followed, with Mankowitz in effect becoming the seventh member of the band.’
    • ‘It has been a long year for the Chancellor, one in which he has seen a number of highs, notably the birth of his son.’
    ecstatic, euphoric, delirious, elated, thrilled, overjoyed, beside oneself, walking on air, on cloud nine, on cloud seven, in seventh heaven, jumping for joy, in transports of delight, carried away, transported, rapturous, in raptures, exultant, jubilant, in a frenzy of delight
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1informal A state of high spirits or euphoria.
      ‘the highs I got from cocaine always ended in despair’
      ‘the team is still on a high from Saturday's victory’
      • ‘All the tension and knots just disappeared and I was on a high for the rest of the day.’
      • ‘Most of the pilots were still on a high from the manner of the victory.’
      • ‘Fortunately, I was on a high by now, and energy was pouring out of me.’
      • ‘There was also a craze for ‘speedballs’ where users take a mix of heroin and crack cocaine to sustain their high.’
      • ‘Then the homecoming we got in Galway, you'd be on a high for a week after it.’
      • ‘He's gone for a lot of French players but French football is on a real high at the moment.’
      • ‘One day she would be depressed and then the next day she would be on a high.’
      • ‘She claims she now has more energy and inspiration, and is on a permanent natural high.’
      • ‘It could have been better, but thankfully we finished on a high by winning the FA Cup.’
      • ‘I was on a high for the rest of the night, and it lasted until the next day.’
      • ‘Cannabis does alter your mind. It can make you more irritable, or sometimes depress you, or sometimes put you on a high.’
      • ‘With a World Cup just months away, England are determined to finish this Six Nations' campaign on a high.’
      • ‘The audience were whipped up into a frenzy of emotion that sent everyone home on a high.’
      • ‘Two trophies in his first six months in charge ensured the club ended last season on a high.’
      • ‘If you are an adrenalin junkie, you can rest assured that the highs you get from a workout with this car will never be beaten by anything else with four wheels and a licence plate.’
      • ‘I want to be clean and healthy and fit for my kids and have normal highs that aren't due to cocaine.’
      • ‘Exhausted cyclist Sarah Ulmer is still on a high from taking gold at the Olympics in world record time.’
      • ‘By the end of the performance I'm absolutely starving and on a real adrenaline high.’
      • ‘He neither drinks, nor smokes, preferring transcendental meditation to the highs attained through substance abuse.’
      • ‘The neurotransmitter plays a major role in drug-induced highs and in addiction.’
      ecstatic, euphoric, delirious, elated, thrilled, overjoyed, beside oneself, walking on air, on cloud nine, on cloud seven, in seventh heaven, jumping for joy, in transports of delight, carried away, transported, rapturous, in raptures, exultant, jubilant, in a frenzy of delight
      View synonyms
  • 3North American informal High school (chiefly used in names)

    ‘I enjoyed my years at McKinley High’
    • ‘I wanted to know because she looked old enough to be in junior high but acted so much younger.’
    • ‘We're both adults now and maybe formed a different idea about ourselves from who we were in junior high.’
    • ‘When we got to the top we would both talk about how life would be like when we were in junior high.’
    • ‘He had gone to my elementary school, moved on to junior high, and I never saw him again.’
    • ‘She had secretly liked him since junior high and now she got to pretend to be with him.’
    • ‘And these were girls that Haylie had grown up with, in middle school and junior high.’
    • ‘The soccer conversation ended as we arrived at the school parking lot of Clemington High.’
    • ‘I have been a diabetic since junior high and had to drink sissy diet sodas for years.’
    • ‘I grabbed his hand, wanting to listen to the song I had listened to back in junior high.’
    • ‘Back in junior high, the mall was the place where my friends and I spent most of our free time.’
    • ‘It's nothing for him to stop by a class room and spend an hour with kids at a local junior high.’
    • ‘I was supposed to be going into my sophomore year with all the friends that I had made last year in junior high.’
    • ‘He has a new family and a job as head janitor in a junior high, but the past isn't through with him yet.’
    • ‘I took a couple of deep breaths, preparing myself for yet another day at Green County High, and then took off for my Algebra class.’
    • ‘Miller is not a musician, but he tried the trombone for one semester in junior high.’
    • ‘Blake stopped the car in front of the junior high and Andy waved at some friends.’
    • ‘I was in the last year of primary school while my sister was in junior high.’
    • ‘She grew up on the North Shore, and met Billy Davie when she was still in junior high.’
    • ‘From the day he and I had met in the fifth or sixth grade, up until our final two years in junior high, we had both been fairly close and good friends.’
    • ‘I've had this pen name since junior high, and it doesn't do a whole lot for me anymore.’

adverb

  • 1At or to a considerable or specified height.

    ‘the sculpture stood about five feet high’
    • ‘So, despite these edicts, new apartment houses continued to be built five or six storeys high.’
    • ‘The sun was already high in a cloudless blue sky and a heat haze shrouded the surrounding mountains.’
    • ‘The decor is sparse and dated, but staff are friendly and keen to explain the different dishes. There is no wait service - you just grab a tray and pile it high.’
    • ‘At last they stopped to eat and rest again, as the sun reached its zenith high above.’
    • ‘In one corner of the room sat a desk and chair, both made of maple wood and piled high with various papers.’
    • ‘But some governments placed it higher on their agendas than others.’
    • ‘The circular table in his office is piled high with newspapers and books that he intends to read if only he could find the time.’
    • ‘He was balding, pudgy, pale and had his pants hitched up a little too high on his waist.’
    • ‘If you prefer the sun head to North Costa Blanca in Spain where, set high on a hill in the Jalon valley is a four bedroom villa with its own swimming pool and sun terrace just an hour from Alicante airport.’
    • ‘I was a little concerned that I would pitch my material too high or too low.’
    • ‘Exploding gas tanks launched huge fireballs and black plumes of smoke high into the air.’
    • ‘Our main focus is on promoting young talent and we are developing this sponsorship to recognise individuals who aim high and work hard.’
    • ‘Any visit to his house was likely to involve a discussion about the placing of a sculpture or just how high on the wall a tapestry should hang.’
    • ‘Some athletes take steroids in the hopes that they will improve their ability to run faster, hit farther, lift heavier weights, jump higher, or have more endurance.’
    • ‘All of the larger lakes in Gran Canaria are situated high up in the mountains.’
    • ‘Dishes from yesterday's dinner are piled high in the sink.’
    • ‘Mr Bond said that before the council collected the mess this week it was piled five feet high against the wall of the flats.’
    • ‘The female builds the nest, which is located on a horizontal branch high up in a conifer tree.’
    • ‘Across the room stood a tower of vinyl albums stacked about 14 feet high.’
    • ‘Around ten minutes to three I observe a plane flying high overhead and heading out towards the Atlantic.’
    • ‘The cheap seats way up high are packed and, in the orchestra, there are just a few empties.’
    • ‘The shade in which they had been resting was rapidly disappearing as the sun rose high into the sky.’
    at great height, high up, far up, way up, at altitude
    View synonyms
  • 2Highly.

    ‘he ranked high among the pioneers of twentieth-century chemical technology’
    • ‘People who listen to Mozart then score slightly higher on specific tests of cognitive function.’
    • ‘It has to be said that Pas de la Casa is boring, unless getting legless ranks high on your list.’
    • ‘The only cities to rate higher on the index were London, Paris and Helsinki.’
    • ‘What is lacking are not the resources, but the political will. It is clear these topics do not rate very high on his agenda.’
    • ‘There is no great benefit from ranking high this year as next year there are no World Championships.’
    • ‘The babies whose parents signed to them later scored higher on repeated tests of verbal ability.’
    • ‘He scored high on intelligence tests, is ambidextrous and is known as a hard worker.’
    1. 2.1 At a high price.
      ‘buying shares low and selling them high’
      • ‘A resale ban makes it easier for producers to divide up the market and keep prices high.’
      • ‘Over the next few weeks advisers will be deciding how many shares to sell and how high to price them.’
      • ‘PC vendors may even keep their prices high and use the cuts to fatten their own margins.’
      • ‘They are cashing in on demand from the North where the value of sterling keeps prices high.’
      • ‘A cynic might argue that drug companies hold back the release of drugs to keep prices high.’
      • ‘It depends in part on how high the oil price goes and for how long.’
      • ‘That is because there is no limit to how high a share price can rise.’
      • ‘Conventional wisdom dictates that investors should buy low and sell high.’
      • ‘Experts say that worries about security in the Middle East are also helping to keep prices high.’
      • ‘McKnight feels these factors will keep the price of the components high.’
      • ‘At one time it had instituted proceedings against more than 130 banks for colluding to keep prices high.’
  • 3(of a sound) at or to a high pitch.

    • ‘We, the campaigners for radical change, have to raise our voices high.’
    • ‘Without realizing it, I had raised my voice high enough for the whole class to hear.’
    • ‘My voice went high with excitement.’
    • ‘‘No!’ Stephanie raises her voice higher than she had anticipated. ‘That's not it at all!’’
    • ‘I sang tenor and there was only like three of us in the whole school who could sing high like that.’

Phrases

  • ace (or king or queen etc.) high

    • (in card games) having the ace (or another specified card) as the highest-ranking.

      • ‘The deck is a standard American deck of fifty-two cards, ace high.’
      • ‘When cutting for deal the cards now rank in their normal order with ace high, and the deal can be one or three cards at a time at the dealer's choice.’
      • ‘The cards of the other suits rank in the normal way from ace high down to two, leaving out the cards of the trump rank.’
      • ‘I put down my three of a kind ace high and leaned back.’
      • ‘Normal ranking of the cards applies, with ace high.’
  • from on high

    • 1From a very high place.

      • ‘From the balcony, there is a bird's eye view of Basingstoke, including the station - a surprisingly elegant building when viewed from on high.’
      • ‘But since the observatory on the 86th floor of the Empire State Building reopened, it might be that the best way to decide what you want to see is to take a look at the city from on high.’
      • ‘On days when there is a north westerly wind, I will be at the White Horse with my hang glider hoping to take to the air, enjoy the flying and the views of Westbury and the Wiltshire countryside from on high.’
      • ‘Some of us can recall when a daisy-cutter was a small, red ball skipping low across the turf, rather than a large black one containing several thousand pounds of penetrative explosives lobbed from on high.’
      • ‘The guests were met by a man serving drinks who told them Esther would make an appearance at 5pm, and then, lo and behold, there she was on a balcony saying hello from on high before descending.’
      1. 1.1From remote high authority or heaven.
        ‘government programs coming down from on high’
        • ‘The decision has come from on high and there's not a lot we can do, really.’
        • ‘Decisions are often made from on high and the person running the pub has very little say in how they can run the operation.’
        • ‘In the past decade, however, strategy and policy have increasingly been handed down from on high, with governors being required to implement such policy with no regard for their concerns over the dangers such implementation may pose.’
        • ‘All languages are human creations, not sent down from on high, and the words we invent change their meanings over hundreds of years.’
        • ‘Grassroots supporters in this region sent a clear signal at the weekend to the party ‘top brass’ that they do not like dictation from on high.’
        • ‘One of the best things about this movement is that no one is handing down a manifesto from on high.’
        • ‘Nick's work with the homeless and the long-term unemployed, has won him recognition from on high, and I'm not just talking about the heavens.’
        • ‘The overtly political lyrics have since been toned down, following a proclamation from on high that Eurovision songs should not be political in content.’
        • ‘It's odd to present results as if delivered on stone tablets from on high when there are such glaring discrepancies between polls.’
        • ‘The inclusion of developing countries in a meeting of advanced industrialised countries reflects an awareness that elitist decisions cannot be imposed from on high without the cooperation of those whose interests they will affect.’
  • high and dry

    • 1Out of the water, especially the sea as it retreats.

      ‘when the tide goes out, a lot of boats are left high and dry’
      • ‘Environment Agency Fisheries Officers swung into action earlier this week to rescue thousands of fish left high and dry after recent river levels plunged after flooding.’
      • ‘By carbon-dating sediments deposited in the lake's spillways or in marshes left high and dry by sudden drops in water, scientists can now chronicle the lake's changing profile.’
      • ‘The ark was a refuge until the waters went down, leaving Noah and his menagerie high and dry on Mount Ararat.’
      • ‘Beadlet anemones are found in such shallow water that they are left high and dry at low tide.’
      1. 1.1In a difficult position, especially without resources.
        ‘when the plant shut down, hundreds of workers found themselves high and dry’
        • ‘The 130 people, many sick or elderly, were left high and dry in the French pilgrimage town after their tour operator, Bon Voyage, couldn't provide a plane on Sunday.’
        • ‘The scale of the crisis will become more evident on Tuesday when the watchdogs deliver their latest report, confirming that 60% of homeowners look set to be left high and dry.’
        • ‘It's a dangerous strategy to sell a hotel mainly on its fashionability: fashions change, and when they do, you're apt to be left high and dry.’
        • ‘And some fear they could be left high and dry if plans to move accident and emergency services from Burnley to Blackburn are also approved.’
        • ‘This suggests yet another consequence of the cuts, which is that the women who are employed in the childcare sector will also be left high and dry now that their source of revenue has been seriously attenuated.’
        • ‘In the end, it is the taxpayer who will have to foot the bill if small fishing communities are left high and dry.’
        • ‘Hundreds of south Essex pupils were today left high and dry again after two popular school bus routes were axed.’
        • ‘So far, trading standards officers in Oldham are trying to help 150 customers who feel they have been left high and dry by the company.’
        • ‘More recently, policyholders were left high and dry when Blue Swan Insurance went into liquidation.’
        • ‘Holidaymakers have been left high and dry at Heathrow Airport as staff walked out in a dispute over clocking on and off.’
        destitute, bereft, helpless, without help, without assistance, without resources, in the lurch, in difficulties, forsaken, abandoned, stranded, marooned
        View synonyms
  • high and low

    • In many different places.

      ‘we searched high and low for a new teacher’
      • ‘Before searching high and low for a buyer, you might consider donating the items to charity.’
      • ‘We searched high and low but there was no trace of the poor fellow and we had no choice but to continue.’
      • ‘I searched high and low, but I couldn't find you and no one seemed to know where you were.’
      • ‘He and Grover had searched high and low for the letter yesterday, but it had been nowhere to be found.’
      • ‘At the end of the day this crime is unprecedented, we are searching high and low to find who is responsible.’
      • ‘I too have searched high and low for an English translation of the Thai Highway Code, to no avail.’
      • ‘He is part of the family and we have been searching high and low for him.’
      • ‘Their distraught owners, who have searched high and low for their missing pets, fear it is more than a coincidence.’
      • ‘Just about this very time four years ago rescue workers had been searching high and low for him.’
      • ‘I have searched high and low for it and have even been round to local shops, but no one has seen it.’
      everywhere, all over, all around, in all places, in every place, far and wide, far and near, here, there, and everywhere, extensively, exhaustively, thoroughly, widely, broadly, in every nook and cranny
      View synonyms
  • high and mighty

    • informal Thinking or acting as though one is more important than others.

      • ‘You might think you're so high and mighty now because you married the master, but I know your beginnings.’
      • ‘Who did she think she was, coming all high and mighty with me?’
      • ‘Even though his Mum was too high and mighty to keep visiting me he used to come by whenever he were near the place and I'm pretty fond of the lad.’
      • ‘I'm so tired of her giving us those looks that make us feel inferior, and I'm tired of her acting all high and mighty.’
      • ‘I tried to act like everyone else in Warrington, high and mighty and convinced of my own superiority, but I couldn't pull it off.’
      • ‘We'd have exactly the same problems here so I'm not going to get all high and mighty.’
      • ‘There have been a lot of great champions but he is just classy - he is never high and mighty in the locker room or anything like that.’
      • ‘You think you're so high and mighty, don't you?’
      • ‘It's a little too easy to come on all high and mighty about insolvency when you've never been there yourself.’
      • ‘You might act all high and mighty, but I know your secret - your mother told me everything.’
      self-important, condescending, patronizing, disdainful, supercilious, superior, snobbish, snobby, haughty, arrogant, proud, conceited, above oneself, egotistic, egotistical, imperious, overweening, overbearing
      View synonyms
  • high, wide, and handsome

    • informal Expansive and impressive.

  • it is high time that ——

    • It is past the time when something should have happened or been done.

      ‘it was high time that she faced the facts’
      • ‘If politics is about people, it is high time that taxpayers saw some form of payback for the money they contribute to society.’
      • ‘It's high time more draconian measures were brought in and quickly.’
      • ‘The fact that Ireland hasn't had a national agricultural policy since we joined the EU shows how complacent we have become and it is high time that we become more pro-active.’
      • ‘I would suggest that it is high time that government reconsidered how it is going to deal with drug pushers, for current methods are expensive, fundamentally ineffective and deny funding in far more needy areas.’
      • ‘The people themselves represent a powerful social resource, and it is high time that the federal government recognizes this.’
      • ‘‘Travel agents and tour operators operate a bonding system and it is high time that airline consumers had the same protection,’ Mr Brazil said.’
      • ‘It's high time the authorities considered giving rebates to people on long-term incapacity benefit.’
      • ‘For a soccer-mad county like Waterford, 24 years is an eternity to be without a cup win and it is high time that that record was addressed and put right.’
      • ‘I think it is high time that elected political representatives took a stand against this sort of behaviour.’
      • ‘Devizes has got a big problem here and it is high time that the schools, the police and the youth club all worked together to find a solution.’
  • on high

    • In or to heaven or a high place.

      ‘a spotter plane circling on high’
      • ‘Someone on high must have decided that we've had more than our fair share of ruined bank holidays.’
      • ‘Someone on high wants it covered up and Brennan is determined to find out why.’
      • ‘We managed, somehow, to keep our jobs, but alas, people on high had noticed and we were soon split up.’
      • ‘How can anyone sit on high, preach the law and preach about justice and then send someone to their death?’
      at great height, high up, far up, way up, at altitude
      View synonyms
  • on one's high horse

    • informal Used to refer to someone's behaving in an arrogant or pompous manner.

      ‘get down off your high horse’
      • ‘I think you'd have to be a bit of an asshole to get on your high horse and say ‘no we don't wanna play any of the old stuff’ and only play songs off the new record.’
      • ‘I think one has to be very careful before getting on one's high horse and saying either that big schools present problems, or little schools are the only way to go.’
      • ‘Let me explain before you get on your high horse.’
      • ‘So maybe the FA should get their own house in order before climbing on their high horse.’
      • ‘Don't get on your high horse Nellie - you know as well as I do that this marriage is a marriage in name only.’
      • ‘It's all very fine the FA getting on their high horse about streaming of live matches, but if a match is sold out and it's only being shown live in Spain, for example, how else is a fan expected to see it?’
      • ‘I just hope that the Minister, instead of getting on her high horse when I talked about the Food Safety Authority and the threat that it represents to a lot of dairy suppliers, will take those concerns more seriously.’
      • ‘Before anyone gets back on their high horse, I have not missed a Sunday for church in something like nine years unless it is for weather, family emergency, or I am travelling.’
      • ‘Granted, you can be quirky and annoying when you get on your high horse about something, but at least you care.’
      • ‘Before you start saying this is just a non-smoker getting on his high horse, let me explain.’
      proud, vain, arrogant, conceited, snobbish, stuck-up, pompous, self-important, superior, egotistical, supercilious, condescending, lofty, patronizing, smug, scornful, contemptuous, disdainful, overweening, overbearing, imperious, lordly, cavalier, high-handed, full of oneself, above oneself
      View synonyms
  • run high

    • 1(of a river) be full and close to overflowing, with a strong current.

      • ‘It's spring in western Montana; the rivers are running high and the newspapers are running stories of capsized canoes and dogs washed away.’
      • ‘The river ran high with a fast, central ribbon of foam.’
      • ‘The Grand River is running high and hard this morning.’
      • ‘The river is running high, and the boats settle into the current south of the Wilson Bridge.’
      • ‘Floods also caused some rail services to be diverted, and the Environment Agency issued warnings via loudhailers that the River Sheaf near Sheffield's Midland Rail Station was running high.’
      • ‘Homeowners and businesses in Sheffield and Doncaster had to pump water from downstairs rooms and cellars and loud hailers were used to warn businesses that the River Sheaf was running high close to Midland Station.’
      1. 1.1(of feelings) be intense.
        ‘passions run high when marriages break up’
        • ‘Whenever you have tensions running high and military forces in close proximity to each other, you have the potential for conflict.’
        • ‘Feelings are running high in Sligo at the moment and passions are only set to increase in the run-up to January 1.’
        • ‘Passions continued to run high in the Italian city of Genoa last night despite the end of the G8 summit.’
        • ‘Ricketts said: ‘Confidence is running high in the camp and everyone is feeling a lot happier after our run of three wins in four games.’’
        • ‘As always, passions will be running high at the start of the game and the play will be fast and furious.’
        • ‘This is obviously an emotive issue, and emotions are currently running high.’
        • ‘In the final analysis, outsiders may wonder why passions are running so high on both sides of the divide.’
        • ‘Feelings are running high on all sides, with some farmers saying the crisis has been mishandled, while others have seemingly profited from distress by claiming compensation of more than £1 million each.’
        • ‘Passions have been running high in the Australian community with regard to her twenty-year sentence for drug trafficking; the majority of people believed she was innocent.’
        • ‘Emotions were running high and people were obviously worried about their jobs.’
        be strong, be vehement, be fervent, be passionate, be intense
        View synonyms
    • see high
      be strong, be vehement, be fervent, be passionate, be intense
      View synonyms
  • a high old time

    • informal A most enjoyable time.

      ‘they had a high old time at the clambake’
      • ‘Barbecues sizzled (either rain or fat), guitars strummed and a high old time was had by all.’
      • ‘The impetus behind the capital of culture project is to put Cork on the map and to give Cork's populace and visitors a high old time.’
      • ‘Undoubtedly we had four days of the highest quality jumps racing, and when the favourites win both the Champion Hurdle and the Cheltenham Gold Cup you would be entitled to conclude that the punters had a high old time of it.’
      • ‘He was haring about on his bike with stabilisers and having a high old time.’
      • ‘He fidgets around the sofa, crossing his arms, chewing his lip and wearing a curious smirk that could either mean he's having a high old time or that he's never hated an interview more.’
      • ‘They lived in a log cabin in the Rockies and fought Indians and rustlers and generally had what seemed to me a high old time.’

Origin

Old English hēah, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hoog and German hoch.

Pronunciation

high

/hī//haɪ/