Definition of hexagon in English:

hexagon

noun

  • A plane figure with six straight sides and angles.

    • ‘Triangles, squares and hexagons create their own proportions and systems.’
    • ‘They are formed from 60 atoms of carbon bonded together in a combination of pentagons and hexagons to form a ball, just like a soccer ball.’
    • ‘The first day of school, she told me that I must be pretty stupid if I didn't know a hexagon had six sides.’
    • ‘Perfect crystal structures can contain pyramids, cubes, or hexagons, but not pentagons.’
    • ‘The diamond core remains intact, but the surface breaks into carbon hexagons and pentagons, effectively encasing the diamond in a shell similar to a buckyball, which is also called a fullerene.’
    • ‘This time the board is made up of hexagons (instead of squares) and up to four may play.’
    • ‘They come in two shapes, either a square or a hexagon.’
    • ‘The design radiates symmetrically from a central point and is constructed from a pattern of circles, equilateral triangles, squares, hexagons and/or six-pointed stars.’
    • ‘This requires that their underlying lattices be based on triangles, parallelograms, or hexagons.’
    • ‘It is composed of pentagons and hexagons of carbon atoms arranged in a sphere, just like a football (or soccer ball for US readers).’
    • ‘The hexagons, pentagons, and triangles that make up the biomes all have their own unique specification due to the irregular nature of the site.’
    • ‘Resembling the shape of a football, Fullerene contains 60 carbon molecules in hexagons and pentagons.’
    • ‘Carbon atoms are linked into hexagons, and the hexagonal pattern makes up the walls of a cylinder only nanometers wide.’
    • ‘The bee's honeycombs, pristine hexagons, are symmetrical over several axes.’
    • ‘You might define a more-general class polygon, which would have triangle as a subclass, along with other subclasses such as quadrilateral, pentagon and hexagon.’
    • ‘In the other case, the sides of the hexagon are parallel to the sides of the given triangle.’
    • ‘On the east side of the hexagon, opposite the entrance from the sea, there is a large porticoed square with its west side open to the harbour, and containing a central structure - possibly a temple.’
    • ‘For example, 10 carbon atoms can be arranged into two conjoined hexagons, each hexagon sharing two carbon atoms with the other.’
    • ‘For those who don't know, a buckyball is an extremely stable soccer-ball-shaped molecule made up of 20 hexagons and 12 pentagons.’
    • ‘Secondly, simple, geometric plans such as squares, triangles, and hexagons are common to the most dramatic of these examples.’

Origin

Late 16th century: via late Latin from Greek hexagōnon, neuter (used as a noun) of hexagōnos six-angled.

Pronunciation:

hexagon

/ˈheksəˌɡän/